Treaty of Paris (1783)

Treaty of Paris1783 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1783Second Treaty of Paris1783 peace treatyTreaty of Paris in 1783independence recognizedTreaty of VersaillesPeace of Parispeace treaty
The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
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American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War.
On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War.
Following the decisive Franco-American victory at Yorktown in 1781, Britain signed the peace treaty of 1783, and American sovereignty was internationally recognized and the country was granted all lands east of the Mississippi River.

Peace of Paris (1783)

Peace of ParisTreaty of VersaillesTreaty of Paris
This treaty and the separate peace treaties between Great Britain and the nations that supported the American cause—France, Spain, and the Dutch Republic—are known collectively as the Peace of Paris.
On 3 September 1783, representatives of King George III of Great Britain signed a treaty in Paris with representatives of the United States of America—commonly known as the Treaty of Paris (1783)—and two treaties at Versailles with representatives of King Louis XVI of France and King Charles III of Spain—commonly known as the Treaties of Versailles (1783).

John Jay

Chief Justice John JayJayfirst Chief Justice of the United States
Representing the United States were Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Henry Laurens, and John Adams.
John Jay (December 23, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father of the United States, abolitionist, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
Representing the United States were Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Henry Laurens, and John Adams.
As a diplomat in Europe, he helped negotiate the peace treaty with Great Britain and secured vital governmental loans.

Northwest Territory

Old NorthwestTerritory Northwest of the River OhioNorthwest
Britain would take the area north of the Ohio River.
The region was ceded to the United States in the Treaty of Paris of 1783.

David Hartley (the Younger)

David HartleyDavidDavid Hartley the Younger
David Hartley and Richard Oswald represented Great Britain.
He was a signatory to the Treaty of Paris.

Indian barrier state

Indian buffer statebarrier stateindependent state
In the area south of that would be set up an independent Indian barrier state under Spanish control.
After the region was assigned to the United States in the 1783 treaty ending the American Revolutionary War, British officials pursued efforts to organize the various tribes within it into a sort of Confederation that would form the basis of an Indian state, independent of the United States and under their tutelage, as a way to protect their fur trade ventures in the region and to block anticipated American attacks upon their remaining North American possessions.

The Bahamas

BahamasBahamianBahama Islands
Spain also received the island of Menorca; the Bahama Islands, Grenada, and Montserrat, captured by the French and Spanish, were returned to Britain.
Spain returned possession of the Bahamas to Great Britain the following year, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
The Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America on September 3, 1783, ended the American Revolutionary War.
It ended with the Treaty of Paris by which Great Britain relinquished the Thirteen Colonies and recognized the United States.

Montserrat

Culture of MontserratHistory of MontserratMS
Spain also received the island of Menorca; the Bahama Islands, Grenada, and Montserrat, captured by the French and Spanish, were returned to Britain.
The French, not intent on truly colonising the island, then agreed to return the island to Great Britain under the 1783 Treaty of Paris.

Spain and the American Revolutionary War

Anglo-Spanish WarAmerican Revolutionary WarSpain
This treaty and the separate peace treaties between Great Britain and the nations that supported the American cause—France, Spain, and the Dutch Republic—are known collectively as the Peace of Paris.
This expedition gave Spain some claim to the Northwest Territory, which was thwarted diplomatically by Great Britain and the young United States in their separate peace in the Treaty of Paris (1783).

Pinckney's Treaty

Treaty of San LorenzoTreaty of Madridceded
In the treaty with Spain, the territories of East and West Florida were ceded to Spain (without a clear northern boundary, resulting in a territorial dispute resolved by the Treaty of Madrid in 1795).
Both East and West Florida, never extensively colonized by the British, were ceded to Spain (who subsequently ruled both provinces as separate and apart from Louisiana) in the 1783 Treaty of Paris at the end of the American Revolutionary War.

British North America

BritishNorth AmericaBritish North American
By the Treaty of Paris (1783), the United States acquired the part of Quebec south of the Great Lakes; at the same time Spain gained West Florida and regained East Florida.

Congress of the Confederation

Confederation CongressCongressContinental Congress
The United States Congress of the Confederation ratified the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784.
Based on preliminary articles with the British negotiators made on November 30, 1782, and approved by the "Congress of the Confederation" on April 15, 1783, the Treaty of Paris was further signed on September 3, 1783, and ratified by Confederation Congress then sitting at the Maryland State House in Annapolis on January 14, 1784.

Ratification Day (United States)

January 14, 1784Ratification DayRatification Day, United States
The United States Congress of the Confederation ratified the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784.
Ratification Day in the United States is the anniversary of the congressional proclamation of the ratification of the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784, at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Maryland by the Confederation Congress.

Benjamin Franklin

Ben FranklinFranklinFranklin, Benjamin
Representing the United States were Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Henry Laurens, and John Adams.
He conducted the affairs of his country toward the French nation with great success, which included securing a critical military alliance in 1778 and negotiating the Treaty of Paris (1783).

East Florida

EastBritish East FloridaEastern Florida
In the treaty with Spain, the territories of East and West Florida were ceded to Spain (without a clear northern boundary, resulting in a territorial dispute resolved by the Treaty of Madrid in 1795).
In the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which ended the war, the British ceded both Floridas to Spain.

France in the American Revolutionary War

FranceFrenchAmerican Revolutionary War
This treaty and the separate peace treaties between Great Britain and the nations that supported the American cause—France, Spain, and the Dutch Republic—are known collectively as the Peace of Paris.
Because of decisive battles on American soil, the French were in a strong position during the peace negotiations in Paris.

West Florida

Florida OccidentalColony of West FloridaWestern Florida
In the treaty with Spain, the territories of East and West Florida were ceded to Spain (without a clear northern boundary, resulting in a territorial dispute resolved by the Treaty of Madrid in 1795).
In the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which ended the war, the British agreed to a boundary between the United States and West Florida at 31° north latitude between the Mississippi and Apalachicola Rivers.

Henry Laurens

HenryLaurens
Representing the United States were Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Henry Laurens, and John Adams.
In 1783 Laurens was sent to Paris as one of the Peace Commissioners for the negotiations leading to the Treaty of Paris.

Jay Treaty

Jay's TreatyJay Treaty of 1794treaty
All posts were relinquished peacefully through diplomatic means as a result of the 1794 Jay Treaty.
The Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, Between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America, commonly known as the Jay Treaty, and also as Jay's Treaty, was a 1795 treaty between the United States and Great Britain that averted war, resolved issues remaining since the Treaty of Paris of 1783 (which ended the American Revolutionary War), and facilitated ten years of peaceful trade between the United States and Britain in the midst of the French Revolutionary Wars, which began in 1792.

Northwestern point of the Lake of the Woods

Northwesternmost pointCanada–United States bordermost north-westerly point
The treaty stated that the boundary of the United States extended from the "most northwesternmost point" of the Lake of the Woods (now partly in Minnesota, partly in Manitoba, and partly in Ontario) directly westward until it reached the Mississippi River.
This point was referred to in the Treaty of Paris in 1783 and in later treaties including the Treaty of 1818.

Northwest Indian War

Northwest Indian Warswar1790 campaign
The British also built an additional fort in present-day Ohio in 1794, during the Northwest Indian War.
Under the Treaty of Paris (1783), which ended the American Revolutionary War, Great Britain ceded to the U.S. "control" of what were known as the Ohio Country and the Illinois Country, which were occupied by numerous Native American peoples.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
Those Loyalists who have adhered to the Unity of the Empire, and joined the Royal Standard before the Treaty of Separation in the year 1783, and all their Children and their Descendants by either sex, are to be distinguished by the following Capitals, affixed to their names: U.E. Alluding to their great principle The Unity of the Empire.