Treaty of Paris (1856)

Treaty of Paris1856 Treaty of ParisPeace of ParisCongress of ParisParis (1856)Paris Conference of 1856peace treatyreturnedTreaty of Paris in 18561856 Paris Peace Treaty
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia.wikipedia
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Crimean War

CrimeaCrimea WarCrimean
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia. The Treaty of Paris came about to resolve the Crimean War, which had begun on 23 October 1853, when the Sultan formally declared war on Russia after the tsar had moved troops into the Danubian Principalities.
The Treaty of Paris, signed on 30 March 1856, ended the war.

Congress of Paris (1856)

Congress of ParisCongress of Paris in 1856Congress of Paris 1856
The treaty, signed on 30 March 1856 at the Congress of Paris, made the Black Sea neutral territory, closed it to all warships and prohibited fortifications and the presence of armaments on its shores.
The Treaty of Paris was then signed on 30 March 1856 with Russia on one side and France, Great Britain, Ottoman Turkey, and Sardinia-Piedmont on the other.

Second Italian War of Independence

Franco-Austrian WarAustro-Sardinian WarSecond War of Italian Independence
Russia, the gendarme of conservatism and the saviour of Austria during the Hungarian Revolution of 1848, angrily resented the failure of Austria to help or assist its former ally, which contributed to Russia's non-intervention in the 1859 Franco-Austrian War, which meant the end of Austrian influence in Italy; in the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, with the loss of its influence in most German-speaking land; and in the Ausgleich (compromise) with Hungary of 1867, which meant the sharing of the power in the Danubian Empire with the Magyars.
In the peace conference at Paris following the Crimean War, Cavour attempted to bring attention to efforts for Italian unification.

Paris Declaration Respecting Maritime Law

Declaration of ParisParis Declaration of 18561856 Paris Declaration
New rules of wartime commerce were set out in the Declaration of Paris: (1) privateering was illegal; (2) a neutral flag covered enemy goods except contraband; (3) neutral goods, except contraband, were not liable to capture under an enemy flag; (4) a blockade, to be legal, had to be effective.
On the conclusion of the Treaty of Paris, which was signed on 30 March 1856, putting an end to the Crimean War (1853–1856), the plenipotentiaries also signed this declaration at the suggestion of Count Walewski, the French plenipotentiary.

United Principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia

United PrincipalitiesRomaniaPrincipality of Romania
The status of Austria as a great power, after the unifications of Germany, Italy and, to a lesser extent, of Romania, was now severely diminished.
The aftermath of the Russian Empire's defeat in the Crimean War brought the 1856 Treaty of Paris, which started a period of common tutelage for the Ottomans and a Congress of Great Powers—the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the Second French Empire, the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, the Austrian Empire, Prussia, and, though never again fully, Russia.

Bessarabia

BasarabiaBassarabiaEastern Moldavia
Russia had to return to Moldavia part of the territory it had annexed in 1812 (to the mouth of the Danube, in southern Bessarabia).
At the end of the Crimean War, in 1856, by the Treaty of Paris, Southern Bessarabia (organised as the Cahul and Ismail counties, with the Bolgrad county split from the latter in 1864) was returned to Moldavia, causing the Russian Empire to lose access to the Danube river.

Moldavia

Principality of MoldaviaPrincipality of MoldovaMoldavian
Russia had to return to Moldavia part of the territory it had annexed in 1812 (to the mouth of the Danube, in southern Bessarabia).
In 1856, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris, the Russian Empire returned to Moldavia a significant territory in southern Bessarabia (including a part of Budjak), organised later as the Bolgrad, Cahul, and Ismail counties.

Danubian Principalities

Romanian PrincipalitiesDanubian PrincipalityPrincipalities
The Treaty of Paris came about to resolve the Crimean War, which had begun on 23 October 1853, when the Sultan formally declared war on Russia after the tsar had moved troops into the Danubian Principalities. Russia thus lost its influence over the Romanian principalities (Moldavia and Wallachia), which, together with the Principality of Serbia, were given greater independence.
The aftermath of Russian defeat in 1856 (the Treaty of Paris) brought forth a period of common tutelage of the Ottomans and a Congress of Great Powers (the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the Second French Empire, the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, the Austrian Empire, Prussia, and, albeit never again fully, Russia).

Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

Lord PalmerstonPalmerstonThe Viscount Palmerston
The British prime minister Lord Aberdeen, who was viewed as being incompetent with the war effort, lost a vote in Parliament and resigned in favour of Lord Palmerston, who was seen as having a clearer plan to victory.
The peace treaty was signed on 30 March 1856.

Mehmed Emin Âli Pasha

Mehmed Emin Aali PashaAli PashaA'ali Pasha
Mehmed Emin Âli Pasha, also spelled as Mehmed Emin Aali (March 5, 1815 – September 7, 1871) was a prominent Ottoman statesman during the Tanzimat period, best known as the architect of the Ottoman Reform Edict of 1856, and for his role in the Treaty of Paris (1856) that ended the Crimean War.

Wallachia

Principality of WallachiaWalachiaWallachian
Russia thus lost its influence over the Romanian principalities (Moldavia and Wallachia), which, together with the Principality of Serbia, were given greater independence.
Briefly under renewed Russian occupation during the Crimean War, Wallachia and Moldavia were given a new status with a neutral Austrian administration (1854–1856) and the Treaty of Paris: a tutelage shared by Ottomans and a Congress of Great Powers (Britain, France, the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, the Austrian Empire, Prussia, and, albeit never again fully, Russia), with a kaymakam-led internal administration.

Otto Theodor von Manteuffel

Otto von ManteuffelBaron Otto Theodor von ManteuffelManteuffel
On 19 December 1850 he was permanently appointed Prussian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, in which function he took part in the negotiations for the Treaty of Paris of 1856.

Alexey Fyodorovich Orlov

Alexey OrlovA. OrlovAleksey Fyodorovich Orlov
In 1856 he was one of the plenipotentiaries who concluded the Peace of Paris.

Berwick-upon-Tweed

BerwickBerwick upon TweedBerwick-on-Tweed
When the Treaty of Paris was signed to conclude the war, "Berwick-upon-Tweed" was left out.

Édouard Dubufe

Edouard Louis DubufeÉdouard Louis DubufeDubufe
He continued to enjoy great success with the aristocracy, receiving a commission from the Emperor to paint the Congress of Paris in 1856.

Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia. The Treaty of Paris was signed on 30 March 1856 at the Congress of Paris with the Russian Empire on one side of the negotiating table and France, the United Kingdom, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia Piedmont on the other side.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia.

Second French Empire

Second EmpireFranceFrench Empire
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia.

Black Sea

BlackEuxinePontus Euxinus
The treaty, signed on 30 March 1856 at the Congress of Paris, made the Black Sea neutral territory, closed it to all warships and prohibited fortifications and the presence of armaments on its shores.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The Treaty of Paris was signed on 30 March 1856 at the Congress of Paris with the Russian Empire on one side of the negotiating table and France, the United Kingdom, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia Piedmont on the other side.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
The Treaty of Paris was signed on 30 March 1856 at the Congress of Paris with the Russian Empire on one side of the negotiating table and France, the United Kingdom, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia Piedmont on the other side.

Kingdom of Sardinia

SardiniaPiedmont-SardiniaKingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia
The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between the Russian Empire and an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia. The Treaty of Paris was signed on 30 March 1856 at the Congress of Paris with the Russian Empire on one side of the negotiating table and France, the United Kingdom, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia Piedmont on the other side.

Sultan

SultanateSultansSulṭān
The Treaty of Paris came about to resolve the Crimean War, which had begun on 23 October 1853, when the Sultan formally declared war on Russia after the tsar had moved troops into the Danubian Principalities.

Russia

Russian FederationRUSRussian
The Treaty of Paris came about to resolve the Crimean War, which had begun on 23 October 1853, when the Sultan formally declared war on Russia after the tsar had moved troops into the Danubian Principalities.