Treaty rights

process for a formalised treaty for Indigenous Victoriansrighttreatiestreaty right
Treaty rights are certain rights that were reserved by indigenous peoples when they signed treaties with settler societies in the wake of European colonization.wikipedia
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Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
This applies to the rights of Alaska Natives and Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada, as well as to a smaller number of Inuit and Metis in Canada who have entered into treaties.
Contemporary Native Americans have a unique relationship with the United States because they may be members of nations, tribes, or bands with sovereignty and treaty rights.

Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis people
This applies to the rights of Alaska Natives and Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada, as well as to a smaller number of Inuit and Metis in Canada who have entered into treaties.
Questions remain as to whether Métis have treaty rights; this is an explosive issue in the Canadian Aboriginal community today.

Section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982

section 35Section Thirty-five of the Constitution Act, 1982section 35(1)
Likewise treaty rights were enshrined in Canada under section 35 by the package of constitutional reforms of 1982.
Section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 provides constitutional protection to the indigenous and treaty rights of indigenous peoples in Canada.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
This applies to the rights of Alaska Natives and Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada, as well as to a smaller number of Inuit and Metis in Canada who have entered into treaties.
A reaction to alleged abuses of indigenous treaty rights by the current federal government, the movement takes particular issue with the recent omnibus bill Bill C-45.

Indigenous rights

Aboriginal rightsrights of indigenous peoplesrights
Treaty rights are not the only rights claimed by indigenous peoples.
These are distinct from "treaty rights" which are enumerated in specific agreements between indigenous groups and the state.

Ancestral domain

ancestral landsancestral landaccustomed places
Many Native nations have reserved rights to hunt and fish in their accustomed places, which are often lands that was given up at the treaty signing, or "ceded land".
In the case of specific rights to hunt and fish in a territory, these are called "aboriginal rights" and are a separate legal category from "treaty rights".

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
Treaty rights are certain rights that were reserved by indigenous peoples when they signed treaties with settler societies in the wake of European colonization.

Treaty

treatiesinternational treatyinternational treaties
Treaty rights are certain rights that were reserved by indigenous peoples when they signed treaties with settler societies in the wake of European colonization.

Settler society

settler societies
Treaty rights are certain rights that were reserved by indigenous peoples when they signed treaties with settler societies in the wake of European colonization.

History of colonialism

European colonizationcolonizationcolonial era
Treaty rights are certain rights that were reserved by indigenous peoples when they signed treaties with settler societies in the wake of European colonization.

Alaska Natives

Alaska NativeNative AlaskanAlaskan Native
This applies to the rights of Alaska Natives and Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada, as well as to a smaller number of Inuit and Metis in Canada who have entered into treaties.

Inuit

InukInuit peopleEskimos
This applies to the rights of Alaska Natives and Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada, as well as to a smaller number of Inuit and Metis in Canada who have entered into treaties.

Self-determination

self determinationright to self-determinationnational self-determination
Indigenous people claim inherent rights to self-determination, which implies that they be recognized as rights-bearing groups (called "tribes", "bands", or "nations" depending on the place and time) capable of self-determination and cultural survival.

Cultural Survival

Cultural Survival Quarterly
Indigenous people claim inherent rights to self-determination, which implies that they be recognized as rights-bearing groups (called "tribes", "bands", or "nations" depending on the place and time) capable of self-determination and cultural survival.

Legal person

legal personalitylegal entitybody corporate
Once the state recognizes that there is another body corporate with legal personality capable of making binding agreements on behalf of its members, then negotiations can begin for mutual exchange and aid: a treaty.

Colonialism

colonialcolonial powerscolonialist
The earliest of these agreements, between colonial powers such the French, British, and the Dutch and various indigenous peoples of the Atlantic coastal regions had the character of military alliances, as between peers.

Atlantic World

Atlantic coastal regionsAtlantic Rim
The earliest of these agreements, between colonial powers such the French, British, and the Dutch and various indigenous peoples of the Atlantic coastal regions had the character of military alliances, as between peers.

Military alliance

alliancealliancesAllied
The earliest of these agreements, between colonial powers such the French, British, and the Dutch and various indigenous peoples of the Atlantic coastal regions had the character of military alliances, as between peers.

Cession

cededcederetrocession
Later treaties, however, were generally about the cession of land from weakened Aboriginal peoples to expanding settler states.

Royal Proclamation of 1763

Proclamation of 1763Royal ProclamationProclamation Line of 1763
By the Royal Proclamation of 1763 the British Crown (i.e. the state) declared that individual British subjects could not buy land from native nations; only the Crown could obtain land from native nations through treaty, which it could then redistribute to individuals.

The Crown

British CrownCrownAustralian Crown
By the Royal Proclamation of 1763 the British Crown (i.e. the state) declared that individual British subjects could not buy land from native nations; only the Crown could obtain land from native nations through treaty, which it could then redistribute to individuals.

Indian reservation

reservationreservationsIndian reservations
By signing treaties, indigenous peoples traded vast amounts of their land and resources in exchange for reserved areas of land (Indian reservations [US terminology] and Indian reserves [Canadian terminology]) and certain provisions like protection (from attacks on their lands), health care, and religious freedom, protection of hunting and fishing rights, and sometimes some monies as well.

Indian reserve

reserveIndian reservesreserves
By signing treaties, indigenous peoples traded vast amounts of their land and resources in exchange for reserved areas of land (Indian reservations [US terminology] and Indian reserves [Canadian terminology]) and certain provisions like protection (from attacks on their lands), health care, and religious freedom, protection of hunting and fishing rights, and sometimes some monies as well.

Treaty 6

6Treaty SixConfederacy of Treaty Six First Nations
By signing treaties, indigenous peoples traded vast amounts of their land and resources in exchange for reserved areas of land (Indian reservations [US terminology] and Indian reserves [Canadian terminology]) and certain provisions like protection (from attacks on their lands), health care, and religious freedom, protection of hunting and fishing rights, and sometimes some monies as well.

Freedom of religion

religious freedomreligious libertyfreedom of worship
By signing treaties, indigenous peoples traded vast amounts of their land and resources in exchange for reserved areas of land (Indian reservations [US terminology] and Indian reserves [Canadian terminology]) and certain provisions like protection (from attacks on their lands), health care, and religious freedom, protection of hunting and fishing rights, and sometimes some monies as well.