Triad (anatomy)

Skeletal muscle, showing Triad as well as T-tubule.

Structure formed by a T tubule with a sarcoplasmic reticulum known as the terminal cisterna on either side.

- Triad (anatomy)

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Muscle cell

Also known as a myocyte when referring to either a cardiac muscle cell , or a smooth muscle cell as these are both small cells.

General structure of a skeletal muscle cell and neuromuscular junction: 1. Axon

2. Neuromuscular junction

3. Skeletal muscle fiber

4. Myofibril
Diagram of skeletal muscle fiber structure

This network is composed of groupings of two dilated end-sacs called terminal cisternae, and a single T-tubule (transverse tubule), which bores through the cell and emerge on the other side; together these three components form the triads that exist within the network of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, in which each T-tubule has two terminal cisternae on each side of it.

T-tubule

T-tubules (transverse tubules) are extensions of the cell membrane that penetrate into the centre of skeletal and cardiac muscle cells.

Skeletal muscle fiber, with T-tubule labelled in zoomed in image.

T-tubules in skeletal muscle are associated with two terminal cisternae, known as a triad.

Skeletal muscle

Skeletal muscles (commonly referred to as muscles) are organs of the vertebrate muscular system that are mostly attached by tendons to bones of the skeleton.

A top-down view of skeletal muscle
3D rendering of a skeletal muscle fiber
Muscle types by fiber arrangement
Types of pennate muscle. A – unipennate; B – bipennate; 
C – multipennate
ATPase staining of a muscle cross section. Type II fibers are dark, due to the alkaline pH of the preparation. In this example, the size of the type II fibers is considerably less than the type I fibers due to denervation atrophy.
Structure of muscle fibre showing a sarcomere under electron microscope with schematic explanation.
Diagram of sarcoplasmic reticulum with terminal cisternae and T-tubules.
Human embryo showing somites labelled as primitive segments.
When a sarcomere contracts, the Z lines move closer together, and the I band becomes smaller. The A band stays the same width. At full contraction, the thin and thick filaments overlap.
Contraction in more detail
(a) Some ATP is stored in a resting muscle. As contraction starts, it is used up in seconds. More ATP is generated from creatine phosphate for about 15 seconds. (b) Each glucose molecule produces two ATP and two molecules of pyruvic acid, which can be used in aerobic respiration or converted to lactic acid. If oxygen is not available, pyruvic acid is converted to lactic acid, which may contribute to muscle fatigue. This occurs during strenuous exercise when high amounts of energy are needed but oxygen cannot be sufficiently delivered to muscle. (c) Aerobic respiration is the breakdown of glucose in the presence of oxygen (O2) to produce carbon dioxide, water, and ATP. Approximately 95 percent of the ATP required for resting or moderately active muscles is provided by aerobic respiration, which takes place in mitochondria.
Exercise-induced signaling pathways in skeletal muscle that determine specialized characteristics of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers
Jogging is one form of aerobic exercise.
In muscular dystrophy, the affected tissues become disorganized and the concentration of dystrophin (green) is greatly reduced.
Prisoner of war exhibiting muscle loss as a result of malnutrition.

Together, two terminal cisternae and a transverse tubule form a triad.

Muscle contraction

Activation of tension-generating sites within muscle cells.

Types of muscle contractions
In vertebrate animals, there are three types of muscle tissues: 1) skeletal, 2) smooth, and 3) cardiac
Organization of skeletal muscle
Structure of neuromuscular junction.
Sliding filament theory: A sarcomere in relaxed (above) and contracted (below) positions
Cross-bridge cycle
Muscle length versus isometric force
Force–velocity relationship: right of the vertical axis concentric contractions (the muscle is shortening), left of the axis eccentric contractions (the muscle is lengthened under load); power developed by the muscle in red. Since power is equal to force times velocity, the muscle generates no power at either isometric force (due to zero velocity) or maximal velocity (due to zero force). The optimal shortening velocity for power generation is approximately one-third of maximum shortening velocity.
Swellings called varicosities belonging to an autonomic neuron innervate the smooth muscle cells.
Cardiac muscle
Key proteins involved in cardiac calcium cycling and excitation-contraction coupling
A simplified image showing earthworm movement via peristalsis
Asynchronous muscles power flight in most insect species. a: Wings b: Wing joint c: Dorsoventral muscles power the upstroke d: Dorsolongitudinal muscles (DLM) power the downstroke. The DLMs are oriented out of the page.
Electrodes touch a frog, and the legs twitch into the upward position

After this, cardiac muscle tends to exhibit diad structures, rather than triads.

Terminal cisternae

Terminal cisternae are enlarged areas of the sarcoplasmic reticulum surrounding the transverse tubules.

Skeletal muscle, with terminal cisterna labeled near bottom.

A T-tubule surrounded by two terminal cisternae is called a triad.

Membrane contact site

Membrane contact sites (MCS) are close appositions between two organelles.

(A) Electron micrograph of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus cells, arrows highlight carboxysomes. (B) Image of intact carboxysomes isolated from H. neapolitanus. Scale bars are 100 nm.

In muscle cells, at the triad, junctophilin, an integral ER membrane protein, is involved in ER-PM contact stabilization by interacting with PIPs in the PM.