Trial court

court of first instancefirst instancecourts of first instancetrial judgetrial courtstrialcourtCourt of Common Pleastrial-level courtfirst
A trial court or court of first instance is a court having original jurisdiction, in which trials take place.wikipedia
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United States district court

U.S. District Courtfederal district courtdistrict court
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system.

Original jurisdiction

originalcourt of first instanceoriginal action
A trial court or court of first instance is a court having original jurisdiction, in which trials take place.
In the United States, courts having original jurisdiction are referred to as trial courts.

Trial

mistrialtriedtrials
A trial court or court of first instance is a court having original jurisdiction, in which trials take place.
An appellate proceeding is also generally not deemed a trial, because such proceedings are usually restricted to review of the evidence presented before the trial court, and do not permit the introduction of new evidence.

State court (United States)

state courtstate courtsstate
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
Cases in state courts begin in a trial court where lawsuits and criminal cases are filed and evidence is eventually presented if a case proceeds to a hearing or trial.

Florida circuit courts

Circuit CourtFlorida Circuit CourtCircuit Court Judge
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
The Florida circuit courts are state courts, and are trial courts of original jurisdiction for most controversies.

California superior courts

Superior CourtCalifornia Superior CourtSuperior Court of California
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
Superior courts in California are the state trial courts with general jurisdiction to hear and decide any civil or criminal action which is not specially designated to be heard in some other court or before a governmental agency.

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
A trial court or court of first instance is a court having original jurisdiction, in which trials take place.
Trial courts are courts that hold trials.

New York Supreme Court

New York State Supreme CourtSupreme CourtSupreme Court of New York
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
The Supreme Court of the State of New York is the trial-level court of general jurisdiction in the New York State Unified Court System.

United States Tax Court

U.S. Tax CourtTax CourtT.C.
Trial courts of limited jurisdiction may be limited in subject-matter jurisdiction (such as juvenile, probate, and family courts in many U.S. states, or the United States Tax Court in the federal judiciary) or by other means, such as small claims courts in many states for civil cases with a low amount in controversy.
The United States Tax Court (in case citations, T.C.) is a federal trial court of record established by Congress under Article I of the U.S. Constitution, section 8 of which provides (in part) that the Congress has the power to "constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court".

Nevada District Courts

district courtsDistrict CourtNevada District Court
For instance, the Maine District Court is a court of limited jurisdiction, but the Nevada District Courts are courts of general jurisdiction.
In the Nevada state court system, the Nevada District Courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction, where criminal, civil, family, and juvenile matters are generally resolved through arbitration, mediation, and bench or jury trials.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
The highest court of appeal in the Unified Court System is the Court of Appeals whereas the primary felony trial court is the County Court (or the Supreme Court in New York City).

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.
At the apex is the seven Justices of the Supreme Court of California, while the California Courts of Appeal serve as the primary appellate courts and the California Superior Courts serve as the primary trial courts.

Court of record

courts of recordrecordof record
Most trial courts are courts of record, where the record of the presentation of evidence is created and must be maintained or transmitted to the appellate court.
A court of record is a trial court or appellate court in which a record of the proceedings is captured and preserved, for the possibility of appeal.

Appellate court

Court of AppealCourt of Appealsappeals court
Appeals from the decisions of trial courts are usually made by higher courts with the power of appellate review (appellate courts).
An appellate court, commonly called an appeals court, court of appeals (American English), appeal court (British English), court of second instance or second instance court, is any court of law that is empowered to hear an appeal of a trial court or other lower tribunal.

Lower court

lowerFirst Instancetrial court
*Lower court
In relation to an appeal from one court to another, the lower court is the court whose decision is being reviewed, which may be the original trial court or appellate court lower in rank than the superior court which is hearing the appeal.

Appeal

appellateappellantwrit of error
Appeals from the decisions of trial courts are usually made by higher courts with the power of appellate review (appellate courts). In the case of most judges hearing cases through the bench trial process, they would prefer that all parties are given an opportunity to offer a vigorous and robust case presentation, such that, errors in testimony, procedures, statutes, etc., do not grow "crab legs" -- meaning compounded errors -- and are remanded or returned to their court on appeal.
Instead, appellate courts will generally defer to the record established by the trial court, unless some error occurred during the fact-finding process.

General jurisdiction

Courts of General Jurisdictiongeneralcompetence
A trial court of general jurisdiction is authorized to hear some type of civil or criminal case that is not committed exclusively to another court.

Civil law (common law)

civilcivil lawcivil litigation
A trial court of general jurisdiction is authorized to hear some type of civil or criminal case that is not committed exclusively to another court.

Criminal law

criminalcriminal casepenal law
A trial court of general jurisdiction is authorized to hear some type of civil or criminal case that is not committed exclusively to another court.

Legal case

casecourt casecases
A trial court of general jurisdiction is authorized to hear some type of civil or criminal case that is not committed exclusively to another court.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.

Federal judiciary of the United States

federal courtfederal courtsUnited States federal court
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.

Florida

FLState of FloridaFloridian
In the United States, the United States district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of the federal judiciary; each U.S. state has a state court system establishing trial courts of general jurisdiction, such as the Florida Circuit Courts in Florida, the Superior Courts of California in California, and the New York Supreme Court in New York.

Limited jurisdiction

special jurisdictionmagistrate courtsspeciality courts
A trial court of limited jurisdiction is authorized to hear only specified types of cases.