Triassic

Triassic PeriodLate TriassicMiddle to Late TriassicPermo-TriassicTriasLower Triassic Triassic 200 million years agoearliest MesozoicEarly Triassic
The Triassic is a geologic period and system which spans 50.6 million years from the end of the Permian Period 251.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Jurassic Period Mya.wikipedia
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Permian

Permian PeriodUpper PermianLower Permian
The Triassic is a geologic period and system which spans 50.6 million years from the end of the Permian Period 251.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Jurassic Period Mya.
The Permian is a geologic period and system which spans 47 million years from the end of the Carboniferous period million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Triassic period 251.902 Mya.

Jurassic

Jurassic PeriodLate JurassicJurassic era
The Triassic is a geologic period and system which spans 50.6 million years from the end of the Permian Period 251.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Jurassic Period Mya.
The Jurassic (from the Jura Mountains) is a geologic period and system that spanned 56 million years from the end of the Triassic Period million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the Cretaceous Period Mya.

Permian–Triassic extinction event

Permian-Triassic extinction eventPermian extinctionPermian-Triassic boundary
Triassic began in the wake of the Permian–Triassic extinction event, which left the Earth's biosphere impoverished; it was well into the middle of the Triassic before life recovered its former diversity.
The Permian–Triassic extinction event, also known as the P–Tr extinction, the P–T extinction, the End-Permian Extinction, and colloquially as the Great Dying, formed the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geologic periods, as well as between the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras, approximately 252 million years ago.

Mesozoic

Mesozoic EraAge of Dinosaursage of the dinosaurs
The Triassic is the first and shortest period of the Mesozoic Era.
The era is subdivided into three major periods: the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous, which are further subdivided into a number of epochs and stages.

Dinosaur

dinosaursDinosaurianon-avian dinosaurs
A specialized subgroup of archosaurs, called dinosaurs, first appeared in the Late Triassic but did not become dominant until the succeeding Jurassic Period. The first true mammals, themselves a specialized subgroup of therapsids, also evolved during this period, as well as the first flying vertebrates, the pterosaurs, who, like the dinosaurs, were a specialized subgroup of archosaurs.
They first appeared during the Triassic period, between 243 and 233.23 million years ago, although the exact origin and timing of the evolution of dinosaurs is the subject of active research.

Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
The first true mammals, themselves a specialized subgroup of therapsids, also evolved during this period, as well as the first flying vertebrates, the pterosaurs, who, like the dinosaurs, were a specialized subgroup of archosaurs.
These characteristics distinguish them from reptiles and birds, from which they diverged in the late Triassic, 201–227 million years ago.

Pterosaur

pterosaursPterosauriapterodactyl
The first true mammals, themselves a specialized subgroup of therapsids, also evolved during this period, as well as the first flying vertebrates, the pterosaurs, who, like the dinosaurs, were a specialized subgroup of archosaurs.
They existed during most of the Mesozoic: from the late Triassic to the end of the Cretaceous (228 to 66 million years ago ).

Therapsid

TherapsidatherapsidsEutherapsida
The first true mammals, themselves a specialized subgroup of therapsids, also evolved during this period, as well as the first flying vertebrates, the pterosaurs, who, like the dinosaurs, were a specialized subgroup of archosaurs. Therapsids and archosaurs were the chief terrestrial vertebrates during this time.
They replaced the "pelycosaurs" as the dominant large land animals in the Middle Permian and were largely replaced, in turn, by the archosauromorphs in the Triassic, although one group of therapsids, the kannemeyeriiforms, remained diverse in the Late Triassic.

Triassic–Jurassic extinction event

Triassic-Jurassic extinction eventTriassic-Jurassic boundaryend Triassic extinction event
The end of the period was marked by yet another major mass extinction, the Triassic–Jurassic extinction event, that wiped out many groups and allowed dinosaurs to assume dominance in the Jurassic.
The Triassic–Jurassic extinction event marks the boundary between the Triassic and Jurassic periods, and is one of the major extinction events of the Phanerozoic eon, profoundly affecting life on land and in the oceans.

Gondwana

GondwanalandGondwanansouthern continents
The vast supercontinent of Pangaea existed until the mid-Triassic, after which it began to gradually rift into two separate landmasses, Laurasia to the north and Gondwana to the south.
The name had been previously used in a geological context, first by H.B. Medlicott in 1872, from which the Gondwana sedimentary sequences (Permian-Triassic) are also described.

Laurasia

LaurasianProto-LaurasiaProtolaurasia
The vast supercontinent of Pangaea existed until the mid-Triassic, after which it began to gradually rift into two separate landmasses, Laurasia to the north and Gondwana to the south.
It separated from Gondwana (beginning in the late Triassic period) during the breakup of Pangaea, drifting farther north after the split.

Early Triassic

Lower TriassicEarlyLower
The Triassic is usually separated into Early, Middle, and Late Triassic Epochs, and the corresponding rocks are referred to as Lower, Middle, or Upper Triassic.
The Early Triassic is the first of three epochs of the Triassic Period of the geologic timescale.

Norian

early NorianMiddle NorianNor
Among other reptiles, the earliest turtles, like Proganochelys and Proterochersis, appeared during the Norian Age (Stage) of the Late Triassic Period.
The Norian is a division of the Triassic geological period.

Carnian

late CarnianCarnian ageTuvalian
During the Carnian (early part of the Late Triassic), some advanced cynodonts gave rise to the first mammals.
The Carnian (less commonly, Karnian) is the lowermost stage of the Upper Triassic series (or earliest age of the Late Triassic epoch).

Late Triassic

Upper TriassicLateKeuper
The Triassic is usually separated into Early, Middle, and Late Triassic Epochs, and the corresponding rocks are referred to as Lower, Middle, or Upper Triassic.
The Late Triassic is the third and final of three epochs of the Triassic Period in the geologic timescale.

Extinction event

mass extinctionmass extinctionsextinction events
Both the start and end of the period are marked by major extinction events.

Rhaetian

RhaeticLower RhaetianRhaetian age
The Rhaetian is, in geochronology, the latest age of the Triassic period or in chronostratigraphy the uppermost stage of the Triassic system.

Friedrich August von Alberti

Friedrich Von AlbertiVon Alberti
The Triassic was named in 1834 by Friedrich von Alberti, after the three distinct rock layers (tri meaning "three") that are found throughout Germany and northwestern Europe—red beds, capped by marine limestone, followed by a series of terrestrial mud- and sandstones—called the "Trias".
Friedrich August von Alberti (September 4, 1795 – September 12, 1878) was a German geologist whose ground-breaking 1834 publication recognized the unity of the three characteristic strata that compose the sedimentary deposits of the Triassic period in Northern Europe.

Middle Triassic

MiddleMid TriassicMid
The Triassic is usually separated into Early, Middle, and Late Triassic Epochs, and the corresponding rocks are referred to as Lower, Middle, or Upper Triassic.
In the geologic timescale, the Middle Triassic is the second of three epochs of the Triassic period or the middle of three series in which the Triassic system is divided.

Paleo-Tethys Ocean

Paleo-TethysPaleotethysPaleotethys Ocean
From the east, along the equator, the Tethys sea penetrated Pangaea, causing the Paleo-Tethys Ocean to be closed.
The Paleo-Tethys or Palaeo-Tethys Ocean was an ocean located along the northern margin of the paleocontinent Gondwana that started to open during the Middle Cambrian, grew throughout the Paleozoic, and finally closed during the Late Triassic; existing for about 400 million years.

Newark Supergroup

Newark GroupTriassic "Gettysburg plainTriassic Basin
The first nonmarine sediments in the rift that marks the initial break-up of Pangaea, which separated New Jersey from Morocco, are of Late Triassic age; in the U.S., these thick sediments comprise the Newark Group.
They were deposited in a series of Triassic basins approximately 190 million years ago as North America separated from Africa.

Geological period

periodperiodsgeologic period
The Triassic is a geologic period and system which spans 50.6 million years from the end of the Permian Period 251.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Jurassic Period Mya.

Pangaea

PangeaOpening of the South AtlanticAmexem
The vast supercontinent of Pangaea existed until the mid-Triassic, after which it began to gradually rift into two separate landmasses, Laurasia to the north and Gondwana to the south.
By the Triassic Period, Pangaea rotated a little, and the Cimmerian plate was still travelling across the shrinking Paleo-Tethys until the Middle Jurassic.

Carnian Pluvial Event

The best studied of such episodes of humid climate, and probably the most intense and widespread, was the Carnian Pluvial Event.
The Carnian Pluvial Event (CPE) is a major global climate change and biotic turnover that occurred during the Carnian, early Late Triassic, ≈230 million years ago.

Staurikosaurus

Teyuwasu
In these formations, one of the earliest dinosaurs, Staurikosaurus, as well as the mammal ancestors Brasilitherium and Brasilodon have been discovered.
Staurikosaurus lived during the late-Carnian and early-Norian stage, of the Late Triassic, approximately 225 million years ago—which makes it one of the earliest dinosaurs known.