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Tribe of Simeon

SimeonSimeoniteSimeonites
According to the narrative in the Book of Judges, the tribe of Judah invited the tribe of Simeon to fight with them in alliance to secure each of their allotted territories.
The Book of Judges locates its territory inside the boundaries of the Tribe of Judah.

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
According to the account in the Book of Joshua, following a partial conquest of Canaan by the Israelite tribes (the Jebusites still held Jerusalem), Joshua allocated the land among the twelve tribes.
"Jews" (Yehudim) is used to denote the descendants of the Israelites who coalesced when the Tribe of Judah absorbed the remnants of various other Israelite tribes.

Book of Joshua

Joshuaconquest of Canaantribal allotments
According to the account in the Book of Joshua, following a partial conquest of Canaan by the Israelite tribes (the Jebusites still held Jerusalem), Joshua allocated the land among the twelve tribes.
The wording of suggests that the tribes of Reuben, Gad, Judah, Ephraim and Manasseh received their land allocation some time before the "remaining seven tribes", and a 21-member expedition set out to survey the remainder of the land with a view to organising the allocation to the tribes of Simeon, Benjamin, Asher, Naphtali, Zebulun, Issachar and Dan.

Twelve Tribes of Israel

tribes of Israel12 tribes of Israeltwelve tribes
According to the Hebrew Bible, the Tribe of Judah (, Shevet Yehudah) was one of the twelve Tribes of Israel.
Judah

Canaan

Canaaniteland of CanaanCanaanites
According to the account in the Book of Joshua, following a partial conquest of Canaan by the Israelite tribes (the Jebusites still held Jerusalem), Joshua allocated the land among the twelve tribes.
The Judean (Jewish, see Ioudaioi) control over the wider area resulted in it also becoming known as Judaea, a term that had previously only referred to the smaller region of the Judean Mountains, the allotment of the Tribe of Judah and heartland of the former Kingdom of Judah.

Davidic line

House of DavidDavidic dynastyDavidic
On the accession of Rehoboam, Solomon's son, in c. 930 BCE, the ten northern tribes under the leadership of Jeroboam from the Tribe of Ephraim split from the House of David to create the Northern Kingdom in Samaria.
Initially, David was king over the Tribe of Judah only and ruled from Hebron, but after seven and a half years, the other Israelite tribes, who found themselves leaderless after the death of Ish-bosheth, chose him to be their king as well.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
The Book of Samuel describes God's repudiation of a monarchic line arising from the northern Tribe of Benjamin due to the sinfulness of King Saul, which was then bestowed onto the Tribe of Judah for all time in the person of King David.
David returns to Gilgal and is escorted across the River Jordan and back to Jerusalem by the tribes of Judah and Benjamin.

Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelnorthern Kingdom of Israel
On the accession of Rehoboam, Solomon's son, in c. 930 BCE, the ten northern tribes under the leadership of Jeroboam from the Tribe of Ephraim split from the House of David to create the Northern Kingdom in Samaria.
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
These tribes formed the Kingdom of Judah, which existed until Judah was conquered by Babylon in c. 586 BCE and the population deported.
At first, only the tribe of Judah remained loyal to the house of David, but soon after the tribe of Benjamin joined Judah.

Ish-bosheth

IshbaalEsh-baalEshbaʿal
However, after the death of Ish-bosheth, Saul's son and successor to the throne of Israel, all the other Israelite tribes made David, who was then the king of Judah, king of a re-united Kingdom of Israel.
In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David.

Shfela

ShephelahJudean foothillsJudean Lowland
The Shephelah (Hebrew: lowland) – the coastal region, between the highlands and the Mediterranean sea, which was used for agriculture, in particular for grains
The Bible assigned land in the Shfela to the tribes of Judah and Dan.

Tribe of Benjamin

BenjaminBenjamiteBenjamites
The Book of Samuel describes God's repudiation of a monarchic line arising from the northern Tribe of Benjamin due to the sinfulness of King Saul, which was then bestowed onto the Tribe of Judah for all time in the person of King David.
After the dissolution of the united Kingdom of Israel in c. 930 BCE, the Tribe of Benjamin joined the Tribe of Judah as a junior partner in the Kingdom of Judah, or Southern Kingdom.

Hebron

el-KhulilHebron/Al-Khalil Old TownHalil
Bethlehem and Hebron were initially the main cities within the territory of the tribe.
It is said to have been wrested from the Canaanites by either Joshua, who is said to have wiped out all of its previous inhabitants, "destroying everything that drew breath, as the Lord God of Israel had commanded", or the tribe of Judah as a whole, or specifically Caleb the Judahite.

Tribe of Ephraim

EphraimEphraimitesEphrem
On the accession of Rehoboam, Solomon's son, in c. 930 BCE, the ten northern tribes under the leadership of Jeroboam from the Tribe of Ephraim split from the House of David to create the Northern Kingdom in Samaria.
Ephraim is often seen as the tribe that embodies the entire Northern Kingdom and the royal house resided in the tribe's territory (just as Judah is the tribe that embodies the Kingdom of Judah and provided its royal family).

Saul

King Saulbattle of GilboaKing Saul of Israel
The Book of Samuel describes God's repudiation of a monarchic line arising from the northern Tribe of Benjamin due to the sinfulness of King Saul, which was then bestowed onto the Tribe of Judah for all time in the person of King David.
After Samuel tells Saul that God has rejected him as king, David, a son of Jesse, from the tribe of Judah, enters the story: from this point on Saul's story is largely the account of his increasingly troubled relationship with David.

Negev

Negev DesertSouthdesert south
Judah's divinely ordained portion is described in as encompassing most of the southern portion of the Land of Israel, including the Negev, the Wilderness of Zin and Jerusalem.
Later the northern part of biblical Negev was inhabited by the Tribe of Judah and the southern part of biblical Negev by the Tribe of Simeon.

Jeroboam

Jeroboam IKing Jeroboam of IsraelBiblical, first king of Northern Kingdom
On the accession of Rehoboam, Solomon's son, in c. 930 BCE, the ten northern tribes under the leadership of Jeroboam from the Tribe of Ephraim split from the House of David to create the Northern Kingdom in Samaria.
Initially, only the tribes of Judah, Simeon and Benjamin remained to form the new kingdom of Judah, loyal to Rehoboam.

Judah (son of Jacob)

JudahJudasJuda
According to the Torah, the tribe consisted of descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob and of Leah.
Judah (, Standard Yəhuda Tiberian Yehuḏā) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the fourth son of Jacob and Leah, the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Judah.

Book of Judges

JudgesShofetimBooks of Judges
In the opening words of the Book of Judges, following the death of Joshua, the Israelites "asked the Lord" which tribe should be first to go to occupy its allotted territory, and the tribe of Judah was identified as the first tribe.
Twice this statement is accompanied with the statement that "every man did that which was right in his own eyes", implying that the redactor is pro-monarchy, ( and ) and the epilogue, in which the tribe of Judah is assigned a leadership role, implies that this redaction took place in Judah.

Ein Gedi

EngediEn GediEn-Gedi
The wilderness – the barren region immediately next to the Dead Sea, and below sea level; it was wild, and barely inhabitable, to the extent that animals and people which were made unwelcome elsewhere, such as bears, leopards, and outlaws, made it their home. In biblical times, this region was further subdivided into three sections – the wilderness of En Gedi, the wilderness of Judah, and the wilderness of Maon.
In, Ein Gedi is enumerated among the wilderness cities of the Tribe of Judah in the desert of Betharaba, and in, it is prophesied that one day, its coastal location will make it into a fishing village, after the water of the Dead Sea has been made sweet:

Joel (prophet)

Joelprophet JoelYo'el
For example, the literary prophets Isaiah, Amos, Habakkuk, Joel, Micah, Obadiah, Zechariah, and Zephaniah, all belonged to the tribe.
However, the book's mention of Judah's suffering and to the standing temple have led some scholars to place the date of the book in the post-exilic period, after the construction of the Second Temple.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Since Simeon and Benjamin had been very much the junior partners in the Kingdom of Judah, it was Judah that gave its name to the identity—that of the Jews.
The Greek term was a loan from Aramaic, corresponding to Hebrew יְהוּדִי, originally the term for a member of the tribe of Judah or the people of the kingdom of Judah.

Assyrian captivity

captivitydestruction of Israel by the Assyriansexile
As part of the kingdom of Judah, the tribe of Judah survived the destruction of Israel by the Assyrians, and instead was subjected to the Babylonian captivity; when the captivity ended, the distinction between the tribes were lost in favour of a common identity.
According to the Books of Chronicles chapter 9 line 3, the Israelites, who took part in The Return to Zion, are stated to be from the Tribe of Judah alongside the Tribe of Simeon that was absorbed into it, the Tribe of Benjamin, the Tribe of Levi (Levites and Priests) alongside the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh, which according to the Book of Kings 2 Chapter 7 were supposedly exiled by the Assyrians (The Biblical scholars Umberto Cassuto and Elia Samuele Artom claimed these two tribes' names to be a reference to the remnant of all Ten Tribes that was not exiled and absorbed into the Judean population).

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
According to the Hebrew Bible, the Tribe of Judah (, Shevet Yehudah) was one of the twelve Tribes of Israel.

Yahweh

GodYahGod of Israel
The Tribe of Judah, its conquests, and the centrality of its capital in Jerusalem for the worship of the god Yahweh figure prominently in the Deuteronomistic history, encompassing the books of Deuteronomy through II Kings, which most scholars agree was reduced to written form, although subject to exilic and post-exilic alterations and emendations, during the reign of the Judahist reformer Josiah from 641–609 BCE.