Trill consonant

Trilltrillstrilledfricative trilllinguolabial trilltrilling Trill FlapFlap or trilllabiodental trill
In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.wikipedia
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Manner of articulation

articulationmanners of articulationspeech
In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.
Others include those involved in the r-like sounds (taps and trills), and the sibilancy of fricatives.

Dental, alveolar and postalveolar trills

alveolar trillrtrill
Standard Spanish <rr> as in perro, for example is an alveolar trill.
The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents dental, alveolar, and postalveolar trills is, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is.

Tap and flap consonants

FlapTapTap/Flap
While single-contact trills are similar to taps and flaps, a tap or flap differs from a trill in that it is made by a muscular contraction rather than airstream.
Taps and flaps also contrast with trills, where the airstream causes the articulator to vibrate.

Gemination

geminategeminatedgeminate consonant
Usually a trill vibrates for 2–3 contacts, but may be up to 5, or even more if geminate.
Lengthened fricatives, nasals, laterals, approximants and trills are simply prolonged.

Toda language

TodatcxThovari
An alleged retroflex trill found in Toda has been transcribed (that is, the same as the retroflex flap), but might be less ambiguously written, as only the onset is retroflex, with the actual trill being alveolar.
Toda is a Dravidian language noted for its many fricatives and trills.

Phonetics

phoneticphoneticallyphonetician
In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.
Trills are consonants in which the tongue or lips are set in motion by the airstream.

Velar consonant

VelarvelarsDorso-velar
The cells in the IPA chart for the velar, (upper) pharyngeal, and glottal places of articulation are shaded as impossible.
A velar trill or tap is not possible according to the International Phonetics Association: see the shaded boxes on the table of pulmonic consonants.

Icelandic language

IcelandicModern IcelandicIceland
Voiceless trills occur phonemically in e.g. Welsh and Icelandic.

List of Latin-script digraphs

ngrrnj
Standard Spanish <rr> as in perro, for example is an alveolar trill.
is used in Central Alaskan Yup'ik for, and in Pinyin to write the trilled vowel in languages such as Yi.

Trilled affricate

Post-trilledvoiceless bilabially post-trilled dental stoptrilled release
A number of languages have trilled affricates such as and.
Trilled affricates, also known as post-trilled consonants, are consonants which begin as a stop and have a trill release.

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
The Czech language has two contrastive alveolar trills, one a fricative trill (written ř in the orthography).

Limburgish

LimburgianLimburgish languageLimburgs
A partially devoiced pre-uvular (i.e. between velar and uvular) fricative trill has been reported to occur as coda allophone of in Limburgish dialects of Maastricht and Weert.

Uvular consonant

Uvularuvular consonantsuvulars
Uvulars may be stops, fricatives, nasals, trills, or approximants, though the IPA does not provide a separate symbol for the approximant, and the symbol for the voiced fricative is used instead.

Lateral consonant

LateralLateral approximantLaterals
Lateral trills are also possible.
Lateral trills are also possible, but they do not occur in any known language.

Linguolabial consonant

linguolabiallabio-lingualapicolabial consonants
A linguolabial trill is not known to be used phonemically, but occurs when blowing a raspberry.

Blowing a raspberry

raspberryBronx cheerblows a raspberry
A linguolabial trill is not known to be used phonemically, but occurs when blowing a raspberry.
In the terminology of phonetics, the former sound has been described as a voiceless linguolabial trill, and as a buccal interdental trill,.

Consonant

consonantsCconsonantal
In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.

Speech organ

speech organsactive articulatorpassive articulator
In phonetics, a trill is a consonantal sound produced by vibrations between the active articulator and passive articulator.

Standard Spanish

Neutral SpanishLatin American SpanishLatin Spanish
Standard Spanish <rr> as in perro, for example is an alveolar trill.

Alveolar consonant

AlveolaralveolarsDental
The coronal trill is most frequently alveolar, but dental and postalveolar articulations and also occur.

Dental consonant

DentaldentalsAlveolar
The coronal trill is most frequently alveolar, but dental and postalveolar articulations and also occur.

Postalveolar consonant

PostalveolarPost- alveolarPost-alveolar
The coronal trill is most frequently alveolar, but dental and postalveolar articulations and also occur.

Retroflex trill

*retroflexed trill
An alleged retroflex trill found in Toda has been transcribed (that is, the same as the retroflex flap), but might be less ambiguously written, as only the onset is retroflex, with the actual trill being alveolar.