Tripitaka Koreana

Tripiṭaka KoreanadaejanggyeongGoryeo DaejanggyeongK.Korean ''TripiṭakaKorean TripitakaPalman DaejanggyeongPrinting woodblocks of the Tripitaka Koreana and miscellaneous Buddhist scriptures
The Tripiṭaka Koreana (lit. Goryeo Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka (Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century.wikipedia
71 Related Articles

Goryeo

Korea (Goryeo Kingdom)Goryeo DynastyKoryo
Goryeo Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka (Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century. The name Goryeo Tripiṭaka comes from "Goryeo", the name of Korea from the 10th to the 14th centuries.
In addition, Goryeo was a period of great achievements in Korean art and culture, such as Koryŏ celadon, which was highly praised in the Song dynasty, and the Tripitaka Koreana, which was described by UNESCO as "one of the most important and most complete corpus of Buddhist doctrinal texts in the world", with the original 81,258 engraved printing blocks still preserved at Haeinsa Temple.

South Gyeongsang Province

Gyeongsangnam-doSouth GyeongsangGyeongnam
The Tripiṭaka Koreana is stored in Haeinsa, a Buddhist temple in South Gyeongsang Province, in South Korea.
There is UNESCO World Heritage Site Haeinsa, a Buddhist temple that houses the Tripitaka Koreana and attracts many tourists.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
The Tripiṭaka Koreana is stored in Haeinsa, a Buddhist temple in South Gyeongsang Province, in South Korea.
After defeating the Khitan Empire, which was the most powerful empire of its time, in the Goryeo–Khitan War, Goryeo experienced a golden age that lasted a century, during which the Tripitaka Koreana was completed and there were great developments in printing and publishing, promoting learning and dispersing knowledge on philosophy, literature, religion, and science; by 1100, there were 12 universities that produced famous scholars and scientists.

Haeinsa

Haeinsa TempleHae-in-saHaein Temple
The Tripiṭaka Koreana is stored in Haeinsa, a Buddhist temple in South Gyeongsang Province, in South Korea. The Tripiṭaka Koreana is the 32nd National Treasure of South Korea, and Haeinsa, the depository for the Tripiṭaka Koreana, has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Haeinsa is most notable for being the home of the Tripitaka Koreana, the whole of the Buddhist Scriptures carved onto 81,350 wooden printing blocks, which it has housed since 1398.

Korea

KoreanKorean PeninsulaSouth Korea
Goryeo Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka (Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century.
The publication of the Tripitaka Koreana onto more than 80,000 wooden blocks and the invention of the world's first metal movable type in the 13th century attest to Goryeo's cultural achievements.

Gojong of Goryeo

GojongKing GojongKing Gojong of Goryeo
To once again implore divine assistance with combating the Mongol threat, King Gojong thereafter ordered the revision and re-creation of the Tripiṭaka; the carving began in 1237 and was completed in 12 years, with support from Choe U and his son Choe Hang, and involving monks from both the Seon and Gyo schools.
In 1251, the carving of the Tripitaka Koreana, a collection of Buddhist scriptures recorded on some 81,000 wooden blocks, was completed.

Tripiṭaka

TripitakaTipitakaTipiṭaka
Goryeo Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka (Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century.

Mongol invasions of Korea

Mongol invasionsinvasionsMongol invasion
The original set of woodblocks was destroyed by fire during the Mongol invasions of Korea in 1232, when Goryeo's capital was moved to Ganghwa Island during nearly three decades of Mongol incursions, although scattered parts of its prints still remain.
There was cultural destruction, and the Hwangnyongsa and the first Tripitaka Koreana were destroyed.

Memory of the World Register – Asia and the Pacific

Memory of the World RegisterUNESCO Memory of the World RegisterAustralian Memory of the World Register
The Tripiṭaka Koreana was designated a National Treasure of South Korea in 1962, and inscribed in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register in 2007.

Ganghwa Island

GanghwadoGanghwaGanghwa-do
The original set of woodblocks was destroyed by fire during the Mongol invasions of Korea in 1232, when Goryeo's capital was moved to Ganghwa Island during nearly three decades of Mongol incursions, although scattered parts of its prints still remain.
In this process, the Tripitaka Koreana was made.

National Treasure (South Korea)

National Treasures of South Koreanational treasure of KoreaNational Treasure
The Tripiṭaka Koreana was designated a National Treasure of South Korea in 1962, and inscribed in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register in 2007. The Tripiṭaka Koreana is the 32nd National Treasure of South Korea, and Haeinsa, the depository for the Tripiṭaka Koreana, has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Many of the national treasures are popular tourist destinations such as Jongmyo royal ancestral shrine, Bulguksa, Seokguram, and Tripitaka Koreana at Haeinsa.

Buddhist texts

Buddhist scripturesBuddhist literatureBuddhist text
Goryeo Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka (Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century.
The most common edition of this is the Taishō Tripiṭaka, itself based on the Tripitaka Koreana.

Korean Buddhism

BuddhismKorean BuddhistBuddhist
To once again implore divine assistance with combating the Mongol threat, King Gojong thereafter ordered the revision and re-creation of the Tripiṭaka; the carving began in 1237 and was completed in 12 years, with support from Choe U and his son Choe Hang, and involving monks from both the Seon and Gyo schools.
A significant historical event of the Goryeo period is the production of the first woodblock edition of the Tripiṭaka called the Tripitaka Koreana.

Hanja

HanchahanmunChinese characters
It is the world's most comprehensive and oldest intact version of Buddhist canon in Hanja script, with no known errors or errata in the 52,330,152 characters which are organized in over 1496 titles and 6568 volumes.

Paektu Mountain

Baekdu MountainMount PaektuChangbai Mountain
The woodblocks are almost as tall as Mount Baekdu at 2.74 km when stacked, measure 60 km long when lined up, and weigh 280 tons in total.

Names of Korea

Land of the Morning Calmname for Koreaname of Korea
The name Goryeo Tripiṭaka comes from "Goryeo", the name of Korea from the 10th to the 14th centuries.

Goryeo–Khitan War

Goryeo-Khitan WarsKhitan invasionGoryeo-Khitan War
Work on the first Tripiṭaka Koreana began in 1011 during the Goryeo–Khitan War and was completed in 1087.

Choe U

Choe WooChoe IChoi Wu
To once again implore divine assistance with combating the Mongol threat, King Gojong thereafter ordered the revision and re-creation of the Tripiṭaka; the carving began in 1237 and was completed in 12 years, with support from Choe U and his son Choe Hang, and involving monks from both the Seon and Gyo schools.

Choe Hang (military official)

Choe Hang
To once again implore divine assistance with combating the Mongol threat, King Gojong thereafter ordered the revision and re-creation of the Tripiṭaka; the carving began in 1237 and was completed in 12 years, with support from Choe U and his son Choe Hang, and involving monks from both the Seon and Gyo schools.

Robert Buswell Jr.

Robert BuswellRobert Buswell, Jr.Robert E. Buswell
The production of the Tripiṭaka Koreana was an enormous national commitment of money and manpower, according to Robert Buswell Jr., perhaps comparable to the US missions to the Moon in the 1960s.

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
The Tripiṭaka Koreana is the 32nd National Treasure of South Korea, and Haeinsa, the depository for the Tripiṭaka Koreana, has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

World Heritage Site

UNESCO World Heritage SiteWorld HeritageWorld Heritage List
The Tripiṭaka Koreana is the 32nd National Treasure of South Korea, and Haeinsa, the depository for the Tripiṭaka Koreana, has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Edo period

Tokugawa periodEdo-periodEdo
The Tripiṭaka Koreana was one of the most coveted items among Japanese Buddhists in the Edo period.

Muromachi period

Japan (Muromachi period)MuromachiMuromachi era
45 complete printings of the Tripiṭaka Koreana were gifted to Japan since the Muromachi period.