Trivial name

trivial namestrivialcommon nameCommon name (chemistry)
In chemistry, a trivial name is a nonsystematic name for a chemical substance.wikipedia
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Systematic name

systematicIUPAC namesystematic nomenclature
In chemistry, a trivial name is a nonsystematic name for a chemical substance.
A semisystematic name or semitrivial name is a name that has at least one systematic part and at least one trivial part.

IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry

IUPAC nomenclatureorganic nomenclatureIUPAC
That is, the name is not recognized according to the rules of any formal system of chemical nomenclature such as IUPAC inorganic or IUPAC organic nomenclature.
However, the common or trivial name is often substantially shorter and clearer, and so preferred.

Chemical nomenclature

chemical nameIUPAC nomenclaturenomenclature
That is, the name is not recognized according to the rules of any formal system of chemical nomenclature such as IUPAC inorganic or IUPAC organic nomenclature.
A common name will often suffice to identify a chemical compound in a particular set of circumstances.

Retained name

As a result, a limited number of trivial chemical names are retained names, an accepted part of the nomenclature.
Retained names may be either semisystematic or completely trivial; that is, they may contain certain elements of systematic nomenclature or none at all.

List of chemical compounds with unusual names

Chemical compounds with unusual nameschemical compounds with an unusual nameList of chemicals with unusual names
Some are given intentionally unusual trivial names based on their structure, a notable property or at the whim of those who first isolate them.

Chemistry

chemistchemicalApplied Chemistry
In chemistry, a trivial name is a nonsystematic name for a chemical substance.

Chemical substance

chemicalchemicalssubstance
In chemistry, a trivial name is a nonsystematic name for a chemical substance.

IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry

Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistryinorganic nomenclatureRed Book
That is, the name is not recognized according to the rules of any formal system of chemical nomenclature such as IUPAC inorganic or IUPAC organic nomenclature.

White metal

tin-lead
(For example, a trivial name such as white metal can mean various things.) On the other hand, systematic names can be so convoluted and difficult to parse that their trivial names are preferred.

Alchemy

alchemistalchemicalalchemists
Trivial names often arise in the common language; they may come from historic usages in, for example, alchemy.

International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry

IUPACInternational Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)International Congress of Applied Chemistry
One such system, established by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), was established in 1950.

American Chemical Society

ACSACS PublicationsAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
Other systems have been developed by the American Chemical Society, the International Organization for Standardization, and the World Health Organization.

International Organization for Standardization

ISOISO standardInternational Organisation for Standardisation
Other systems have been developed by the American Chemical Society, the International Organization for Standardization, and the World Health Organization.

World Health Organization

WHOWorld Health OrganisationWorld Health Organization (WHO)
Other systems have been developed by the American Chemical Society, the International Organization for Standardization, and the World Health Organization.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Gold

Aunative goldgold dust
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Silver

Agsilver orenative silver
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Tin

SnGray tintinfoil
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Mercury (element)

mercuryquicksilverHg
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Copper

CuCu 2+ cupric
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Lead

Pblead orelead mining
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Iron

FeFe 2+ Fe(III)
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Sulfur

sulphurSbrimstone
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Carbon

Ccarbonaceouscarbon atom
Nine elements were known by the Middle Ages – gold, silver, tin, mercury, copper, lead, iron, sulfur, and carbon.

Louis-Bernard Guyton de Morveau

Guyton de MorveauLouis Bernard Guyton de MorveauGuyton de Morveau, Baron Louis Bernard
Systematic nomenclature began after Louis-Bernard Guyton de Morveau stated the need for “a constant method of denomination, which helps the intelligence and relieves the memory”.