Trivium

Trivium (education)classical liberal arts curriculumclassical triviumhumanitiesthree ancient arts of discoursetrivialtrivium school
The trivium is the lower division of the seven liberal arts and comprises grammar, logic, and rhetoric.wikipedia
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Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
The trivium is the lower division of the seven liberal arts and comprises grammar, logic, and rhetoric.
Along with grammar and logic (or dialectic – see Martianus Capella), it is one of the three ancient arts of discourse.

Quadrivium

quadriviamathematicsquadrivial
The trivium is implicit in De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii ("On the Marriage of Philology and Mercury") by Martianus Capella, but the term was not used until the Carolingian Renaissance, when it was coined in imitation of the earlier quadrivium. Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).
The quadrivium (plural: quadrivia ) is the four subjects, or arts (namely arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy), taught after teaching the trivium.

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
The trivium is the lower division of the seven liberal arts and comprises grammar, logic, and rhetoric.
Belonging to the trivium of the seven liberal arts, grammar was taught as a core discipline throughout the Middle Ages, following the influence of authors from Late Antiquity, such as Priscian.

Classical education movement

classical educationclassicalclassical school
Contemporary iterations have taken various forms, including those found in certain British and American universities (some being part of the Classical education movement) and at the independent Oundle School in the United Kingdom.
By the end of the 18th century, in addition to the trivium and quadrivium of the Middle Ages, the definition of a classical education embraced study of literature, poetry, drama, philosophy, history, art, and languages.

Oundle School

Oundlea substantial boarding schoolBramston
Contemporary iterations have taken various forms, including those found in certain British and American universities (some being part of the Classical education movement) and at the independent Oundle School in the United Kingdom.
A new subject, Trivium, gives Third Form pupils timetabled engagement with extension topics for their own sake, using methods of thought drawn from the traditional liberal arts.

Carolingian Renaissance

CarolingianCarolingian periodCarolingian Reforms
The trivium is implicit in De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii ("On the Marriage of Philology and Mercury") by Martianus Capella, but the term was not used until the Carolingian Renaissance, when it was coined in imitation of the earlier quadrivium.
Alcuin led this effort and was responsible for the writing of textbooks, creation of word lists, and establishing the trivium and quadrivium as the basis for education.

Dialectic

dialecticsdialecticalHegelian dialectic
Logic (also dialectic) is the "mechanics" of thought and of analysis, the process of identifying fallacious arguments and statements and so systematically removing contradictions, thereby producing factual knowledge that can be trusted.
Logic, which could be considered to include dialectic, was one of the three liberal arts taught in medieval universities as part of the trivium; the other elements were rhetoric and grammar.

Liberal arts education

liberal artsliberal studiesArts
The trivium is the lower division of the seven liberal arts and comprises grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).
Grammar, logic, and rhetoric were the core liberal arts (the trivium), while arithmetic, geometry, the theory of music, and astronomy were the following stage of education (as the quadrivium).

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
The three subjects together were denoted by the word trivium during the Middle Ages, but the tradition of first learning those three subjects was established in ancient Greece. Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).
The basic learning of the letters and numbers remained the province of the family or a village priest, but the secondary subjects of the trivium—grammar, rhetoric, logic—were studied in cathedral schools or in schools provided by cities.

Marshall McLuhan

McLuhanMarshal McLuhanHot and cool media
While studying the trivium at Cambridge, he took the first steps toward his eventual conversion to Roman Catholicism in 1937, founded on his reading of G. K. Chesterton.

Sister Miriam Joseph

Joseph, Sister MiriamSister Miriam Joseph Rauh
Sister Miriam Joseph, in The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric (2002), described the trivium as follows:
She is the author of several books including The Trivium which is a text she developed as part of the core curriculum of Saint Mary's College.

Dorothy L. Sayers

Dorothy SayersDorothy L SayersDorothy Leigh Sayers
Her influential essay "The Lost Tools of Learning" has been used by many schools in the US as a basis for the classical education movement, reviving the medieval trivium subjects (grammar, logic, and rhetoric) as tools to enable the analysis and mastery of every other subject.

Logic

logicianlogicallogics
The trivium is the lower division of the seven liberal arts and comprises grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Logic (also dialectic) is the "mechanics" of thought and of analysis, the process of identifying fallacious arguments and statements and so systematically removing contradictions, thereby producing factual knowledge that can be trusted.

Martianus Capella

MartianusCapellanCapella
The trivium is implicit in De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii ("On the Marriage of Philology and Mercury") by Martianus Capella, but the term was not used until the Carolingian Renaissance, when it was coined in imitation of the earlier quadrivium.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
Grammar, logic, and rhetoric were essential to a classical education, as explained in Plato's dialogues.

Education in ancient Greece

educationGreek educationancient Greece
The three subjects together were denoted by the word trivium during the Middle Ages, but the tradition of first learning those three subjects was established in ancient Greece.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Contemporary iterations have taken various forms, including those found in certain British and American universities (some being part of the Classical education movement) and at the independent Oundle School in the United Kingdom.

Arithmetic

arithmetic operationsarithmeticsarithmetic operation
Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).

Geometry

geometricgeometricalgeometries
Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).

Music

audiomusicalPop
Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
Etymologically, the Latin word trivium means "the place where three roads meet" (tri + via); hence, the subjects of the trivium are the foundation for the quadrivium, the upper division of the medieval education in the liberal arts, which comprised arithmetic (numbers as abstract concepts), geometry (numbers in space), music (numbers in time), and astronomy (numbers in space and time).

Classical antiquity

antiquityclassicalancient
Educationally, the trivium and the quadrivium imparted to the student the seven liberal arts of classical antiquity.

Law of identity

identityprinciple of identityA is A
Hence, the Law of Identity: a tree is a tree, and not a cat.

Thought

thinkingthoughtsthink
Logic (also dialectic) is the "mechanics" of thought and of analysis, the process of identifying fallacious arguments and statements and so systematically removing contradictions, thereby producing factual knowledge that can be trusted.