Tropical rainforest

tropical rain foresttropical rainforeststropicaltropical rain forestsrainforestsrainforesttropical forestsjungleemergentlowland rainforest
Tropical rainforests are rainforests that occur in areas of tropical rainforest climate in which there is no dry season – all months have an average precipitation of at least 60 mm – and may also be referred to as lowland equatorial evergreen rainforest.wikipedia
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Rainforest

rain forestrainforestsemergent
Tropical rainforests are rainforests that occur in areas of tropical rainforest climate in which there is no dry season – all months have an average precipitation of at least 60 mm – and may also be referred to as lowland equatorial evergreen rainforest.
Rainforests are forests characterized by high rainfall, with annual rainfall in the case of tropical rainforests between 250 and 450 cm, and definitions varying by region for temperate rainforests.

Deforestation

deforestedland clearingforest clearing
Tropical rain forests have been subjected to heavy logging and agricultural clearance throughout the 20th century, and the area covered by rainforests around the world is rapidly shrinking. The moisture from the forests is important to the rainfall in Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina Deforestation in the Amazon rainforest region was one of the main reason that cause the severe Drought of 2014-2015 in Brazil
The most concentrated deforestation occurs in tropical rainforests.

Seasonal tropical forest

monsoon foresttropical seasonal forestmonsoon forests
Within the World Wildlife Fund's biome classification, tropical rainforests are a type of tropical moist broadleaf forest (or tropical wet forest) that also includes the more extensive seasonal tropical forests.
(note: Af in light green is Tropical rainforest)]]

Biome

biotabiomesmajor habitat type
True rainforests are typically found between 10 degrees north and south of the equator (see map); they are a sub-set of the tropical forest biome that occurs roughly within the 28 degree latitudes (in the equatorial zone between the Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn).

Medicine chest (idiom)

world's largest pharmacy
Tropical rainforests have been called the "world's largest pharmacy", because over one quarter of natural medicines have been discovered within them.
In nature, tropical rainforests are considered the world's medicine chest or world's largest pharmacy as 25% of Western pharmaceuticals are derived from ingredients found in tropical rainforests.

Caribbean

West Indiesthe CaribbeanWest Indian
They are found in parts of South America, in Central America and around the Caribbean, in coastal West Africa, parts of the Indian subcontinent, and across much of Indochina.
The climate of the area is tropical, varying from tropical rainforest in some areas to tropical savanna in others.

Poison dart frog

poison dart frogsdendrobatidpoison arrow frog
Examples include leopard (Panthera pardus), poison dart frogs (Dendrobates sp.), ring-tailed coati (Nasua nasua), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and many species of Coleoptera.
These frogs are generally found in tropical rainforests, including in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Suriname, French Guiana, Peru, Panama, Guyana, Nicaragua, and Hawaii (introduced).

Tree

treessaplingarboreal
The emergent layer contains a small number of very large trees, called emergents, which grow above the general canopy, reaching heights of 45–55 m, although on occasion a few species will grow to 70–80 m tall.
Tropical rainforests are among the most biodiverse habitats in the world.

Papilio antimachus

African giant swallowtailantimachusgiant African swallowtail
Other species habituating this layer include many avian species such as the yellow-casqued wattled hornbill (Ceratogymna elata), collared sunbird (Anthreptes collaris), grey parrot (Psitacus erithacus), keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus), scarlet macaw (Ara macao) as well as other animals like the spider monkey (Ateles sp.), African giant swallowtail (Papilio antimachus), three-toed sloth (Bradypus tridactylus), kinkajou (Potos flavus), and tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla).
P. antimachus live in the tropical rainforests of west and central Africa.

Soil

dirtsoilssoil moisture
This high level of precipitation often results in poor soils due to leaching of soluble nutrients in the ground.
The majority is ultimately lost via transpiration, while evaporation from the soil surface is also substantial, the transpiration:evaporation ratio varying according to vegetation type and climate, peaking in tropical rainforests and dipping in steppes and deserts.

Balizia elegans

Some examples of emergents include: Balizia elegans, Dipteryx panamensis, Hieronyma alchorneoides, Hymenolobium mesoamericanum, Lecythis ampla and Terminalia oblonga.
It is a tree in the emergent layer of the Tropical rainforest of South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica and Honduras).

Borneo

BorneanKalimantanBorneo Island
Tropical rainforests have harboured human life for many millennia, with many Indian tribes in South- and Central America, who belong to the Indigenous peoples of the Americas, the Congo Pygmies in Central Africa, and several tribes in South-East Asia, like the Dayak people and the Penan people in Borneo.
Borneo is home to one of the oldest rainforests in the world.

Kinkajou

kinkajousKinkajou (''Potos flavus'')P. flavus
Other species habituating this layer include many avian species such as the yellow-casqued wattled hornbill (Ceratogymna elata), collared sunbird (Anthreptes collaris), grey parrot (Psitacus erithacus), keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus), scarlet macaw (Ara macao) as well as other animals like the spider monkey (Ateles sp.), African giant swallowtail (Papilio antimachus), three-toed sloth (Bradypus tridactylus), kinkajou (Potos flavus), and tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla).
Their altitudinal range is from sea level to 2500 m. They are found in closed-canopy tropical forests, including lowland rainforest, montane forest, dry forest, gallery forest and secondary forest.

Tropical forest

tropical foreststropicalforest
True rainforests are typically found between 10 degrees north and south of the equator (see map); they are a sub-set of the tropical forest biome that occurs roughly within the 28 degree latitudes (in the equatorial zone between the Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn).
Tropical rainforest

Leopard

leopardspantherpanthers
Examples include leopard (Panthera pardus), poison dart frogs (Dendrobates sp.), ring-tailed coati (Nasua nasua), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and many species of Coleoptera.
The black panther is common in the equatorial rainforest of the Malay Peninsula and the tropical rainforest on the slopes of some African mountains such as Mount Kenya.

Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests

subtropical or tropical moist lowland foresttropical moist broadleaf foresttropical moist forest
Within the World Wildlife Fund's biome classification, tropical rainforests are a type of tropical moist broadleaf forest (or tropical wet forest) that also includes the more extensive seasonal tropical forests.
Lowland equatorial evergreen rain forests, commonly known as tropical rainforests, are forests which receive high rainfall (tropical rainforest climate with more than 2000 mm, or 80 inches, annually) throughout the year. These forests occur in a belt around the equator, with the largest areas in the Amazon basin of South America, the Congo basin of central Africa, and parts of the Malay Archipelago. About half of the world's tropical rainforests are in the South American countries of Brazil and Peru. Rainforests now cover less than 6% of Earth's land surface. Scientists estimate that more than half of all the world's plant and animal species live in tropical rainforests.

Canopy (biology)

canopyforest canopytree canopy
The emergent layer contains a small number of very large trees, called emergents, which grow above the general canopy, reaching heights of 45–55 m, although on occasion a few species will grow to 70–80 m tall.
The highest terrestrial biodiversity resides in the canopy of tropical rainforests.

Forest

forestsconiferous forestsforested
Some groups of hunter-gatherers have exploited rainforest on a seasonal basis but dwelt primarily in adjacent savanna and open forest environments where food is much more abundant.
The latitudes 10° north and south of the equator are mostly covered in tropical rainforest, and the latitudes between 53°N and 67°N have boreal forest.

Epiphyte

epiphyticepiphytesepiphytically
The densest areas of biodiversity are found in the forest canopy, as it often supports a rich flora of epiphytes, including orchids, bromeliads, mosses and lichens.
Assemblages of large epiphytes occur most abundantly in moist tropical forests, but mosses and lichens occur as epiphytes in almost all biomes.

Evergreen

evergreen treeevergreen treesevergreens
Tall, broad-leaved evergreen trees are the dominant plants.
Most tropical rainforest plants are considered to be evergreens, replacing their leaves gradually throughout the year as the leaves age and fall, whereas species growing in seasonally arid climates may be either evergreen or deciduous.

King colobus

Simia polycomos
Several unique faunal species inhabit this layer such as the crowned eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus), the king colobus (Colobus polykomos), and the large flying fox (Pteropus vampyrus).
The king colobus monkey is found in lowland and montane tropical rainforests.

Amazon rainforest

AmazonAmazonianAmazonia
The moisture from the forests is important to the rainfall in Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina Deforestation in the Amazon rainforest region was one of the main reason that cause the severe Drought of 2014-2015 in Brazil
The Amazon represents over half of the planet's remaining rainforests, and comprises the largest and most biodiverse tract of tropical rainforest in the world, with an estimated 390 billion individual trees divided into 16,000 species.

Ghana

🇬🇭GhanaianGHA
In Ghana, a West African nation, deforestation from decades of mining activity left about 12% of the country's original rainforest intact.
Its diverse geography and ecology ranges from coastal savannahs to tropical rain forests.

Holdridge life zones

biotemperatureHoldridgeHoldridge life zone classification
According to Holdridge’s classification of tropical ecosystems, true tropical rainforests have an annual rainfall greater than 2 m and annual temperature greater than 24 degrees Celsius, with a potential evapotranspiration ratio (PET) value of
38) Tropical rain forest

New Guinea

PapuaPapua New GuineanNew Guinea island
With this addition, Brazil has now overtaken the island of New Guinea as the country having the largest number of uncontacted tribes.
The flora of New Guinea is a mixture of many tropical rainforest species with origins in Asia, together with typically Australasian flora.