Truman Capote

CapoteCapote in KansasTruman Coyote
Truman Garcia Capote (born Truman Streckfus Persons, September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) was an American novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, playwright, and actor.wikipedia
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In Cold Blood

book of the same namebookClutter family
Several of his short stories, novels, and plays have been praised as literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany's (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood (1966), which he labeled a "nonfiction novel".
In Cold Blood is a non-fiction novel by American author Truman Capote, first published in 1966; it details the 1959 murders of four members of the Herbert Clutter family in the small farming community of Holcomb, Kansas.

Other Voices, Other Rooms (novel)

Other Voices, Other Roomsof the same nameOther Voices, Other Rooms'' (novel)
The critical success of "Miriam" (1945) attracted the attention of Random House publisher Bennett Cerf and resulted in a contract to write the novel Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948).
Other Voices, Other Rooms is a 1948 novel by Truman Capote.

Harper Lee

Nelle Harper LeeLeeHarper Lee Award
Capote spent four years writing the book, aided by his lifelong friend Harper Lee, who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird (1960). In Monroeville, he was a neighbor and friend of author Harper Lee, who probably based the character Dill on Capote.
She assisted her close friend Truman Capote in his research for the book In Cold Blood (1966).

Miriam (short story)

Miriameponymous short storyMiriam" (short story)
The critical success of "Miriam" (1945) attracted the attention of Random House publisher Bennett Cerf and resulted in a contract to write the novel Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948).
"Miriam" is a short story written by Truman Capote.

A Christmas Memory

a short story by Truman Capoteshort story of the same name
"Her face is remarkable – not unlike Lincoln's, craggy like that, and tinted by sun and wind", is how Capote described Sook in "A Christmas Memory" (1956). Breakfast at Tiffany's: A Short Novel and Three Stories (1958) brought together the title novella and three shorter tales: "House of Flowers", "A Diamond Guitar" and "A Christmas Memory".
"A Christmas Memory" is a short story by Truman Capote.

Monroeville, Alabama

MonroevilleMonroeville, AL
His parents divorced when he was four, and he was sent to Monroeville, Alabama, where, for the following four to five years, he was raised by his mother's relatives.
Monroeville is known as the hometown of two prominent writers of the post-World War II period, Truman Capote and Harper Lee, who were childhood friends in the 1930s.

To Kill a Mockingbird

novel of the same nameTo Kill a Mocking Bird1960 novel of the same name
Capote spent four years writing the book, aided by his lifelong friend Harper Lee, who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).
Born in 1926, Harper Lee grew up in the Southern town of Monroeville, Alabama, where she became close friends with soon-to-be famous writer Truman Capote.

Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

Scholastic Art and Writing AwardsThe Scholastic Art & Writing AwardsScholastic Art and Writing Award
Capote received recognition for his early work from The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in 1936.
Its past award recipients include Andy Warhol, Frances Farmer, Hughie Lee-Smith, Cy Twombly, Charles White, Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, Richard Linklater, Stephen King, John Updike, Ken Burns, Lena Dunham, Paul Chan, Kay WalkingStick, Zac Posen and Joyce Carol Oates among many others.

Summer Crossing

He left his job to live with relatives in Alabama and began writing his first novel, Summer Crossing.
Summer Crossing is the first novel written by American author Truman Capote.

Clutter family murders

Herbert ClutterClutter familyKenyon Clutter
Capote earned the most fame with In Cold Blood, a journalistic work about the murder of a Kansas farm family in their home.
The Clutter family murders were detailed in a 1966 non-fiction novel In Cold Blood by Truman Capote.

The New Yorker

New YorkerNew Yorker MagazineThe New Yorker Magazine
While still attending Franklin in 1942, Capote began working as a copyboy in the art department at The New Yorker, a job he held for two years before being fired for angering poet Robert Frost. His stories were published in both literary quarterlies and well-known popular magazines, including The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Bazaar, Harper's Magazine, Mademoiselle, The New Yorker, Prairie Schooner, and Story.
In subsequent decades the magazine published short stories by many of the most respected writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including Ann Beattie, Sally Benson, Truman Capote, John Cheever, Roald Dahl, Mavis Gallant, Geoffrey Hellman, Ruth McKenney, John McNulty, Joseph Mitchell, Alice Munro, Haruki Murakami, Vladimir Nabokov, John O'Hara, Dorothy Parker, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, Irwin Shaw, James Thurber, John Updike, Eudora Welty, Stephen King, and E. B. White.

Mademoiselle (magazine)

MademoiselleMademoiselle MagazineMadamoiselle
His stories were published in both literary quarterlies and well-known popular magazines, including The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Bazaar, Harper's Magazine, Mademoiselle, The New Yorker, Prairie Schooner, and Story.
Mademoiselle, primarily a fashion magazine, was also known for publishing short stories by noted authors such as Truman Capote, Joyce Carol Oates, William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, James Baldwin, Flannery O'Connor, Sylvia Plath, Paul Bowles, Jane Bowles, Jane Smiley, Mary Gordon, Paul Theroux, Sue Miller, Barbara Kingsolver, Perri Klass, Mona Simpson, Alice Munro, Harold Brodkey, Pam Houston, Jean Stafford, and Susan Minot.

Patricia Highsmith

five times
(He later endorsed Patricia Highsmith as a Yaddo candidate, and she wrote Strangers on a Train while she was there.)
Based on the recommendation from Truman Capote, Highsmith was accepted by the Yaddo artist's retreat during the summer of 1948, where she worked on her first novel, Strangers on a Train.

Greenwich High School

Greenwich HS (CT)Greenwich
In 1939, the Capote family moved to Greenwich, Connecticut, and Truman attended Greenwich High School, where he wrote for both the school's literary journal, The Green Witch, and the school newspaper.

List of To Kill a Mockingbird characters

Boo RadleyScout FinchScout
In Monroeville, he was a neighbor and friend of author Harper Lee, who probably based the character Dill on Capote.
This character is believed to be based on author Truman Capote, a childhood friend of Harper Lee.

The Grass Harp

novel of the same namea novella
In the early 1950s, Capote took on Broadway and films, adapting his 1951 novella, The Grass Harp, into a 1952 play of the same name (later a 1971 musical and a 1995 film), followed by the musical House of Flowers (1954), which spawned the song "A Sleepin' Bee".
The Grass Harp is a novel by Truman Capote published on October 1, 1951 It tells the story of an orphaned boy and two elderly ladies who observe life from a tree.

Harper's Bazaar

Harper’s BazaarHarpers BazaarHarpers & Queen
His stories were published in both literary quarterlies and well-known popular magazines, including The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Bazaar, Harper's Magazine, Mademoiselle, The New Yorker, Prairie Schooner, and Story.
Brodovitch's signature use of white space, his innovation of Bazaar 's iconic Didot logo, and the cinematic quality that his obsessive cropping brought to layouts (not even the work of Man Ray and Henri Cartier-Bresson was safe from his busy scissors) compelled Truman Capote to write, "What Dom Pérignon was to champagne ... so [Brodovitch] has been to ... photographic design and editorial layout."

Local Color (book)

Local ColorLocal Color'' (book)
After A Tree of Night, Capote published a collection of his travel writings, Local Color (1950), which included nine essays originally published in magazines between 1946 and 1950.
Local Color is the third published book by the American author Truman Capote, released in the Fall of 1950.

Bennett Cerf

Bennet CerfBennett
The critical success of "Miriam" (1945) attracted the attention of Random House publisher Bennett Cerf and resulted in a contract to write the novel Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948).
Cerf's talent in building and maintaining relationships brought contracts with such writers as William Faulkner, John O'Hara, Eugene O'Neill, James Michener, Truman Capote, Theodor Seuss Geisel, and others.

House of Flowers (musical)

House of FlowersDon't Like GoodbyesA Sleepin' Bee
In the early 1950s, Capote took on Broadway and films, adapting his 1951 novella, The Grass Harp, into a 1952 play of the same name (later a 1971 musical and a 1995 film), followed by the musical House of Flowers (1954), which spawned the song "A Sleepin' Bee".
House of Flowers is a musical by Harold Arlen (music and lyrics) and Truman Capote (lyrics and book), based on his own short story, first published in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1958).

The Grass Harp (play)

The Grass Harp1952 play of the same nameThe Grass Harp'' (play)
In the early 1950s, Capote took on Broadway and films, adapting his 1951 novella, The Grass Harp, into a 1952 play of the same name (later a 1971 musical and a 1995 film), followed by the musical House of Flowers (1954), which spawned the song "A Sleepin' Bee".
The Grass Harp is a play written by Truman Capote based on his novel of the same name.

Norman Mailer

MailerThe Prisoner of SexMailer, Norman
The heroine of Breakfast at Tiffany's, Holly Golightly, became one of Capote's best known creations, and the book's prose style prompted Norman Mailer to call Capote "the most perfect writer of my generation".
Along with Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer is considered an innovator of creative nonfiction, a genre sometimes called New Journalism, which uses the style and devices of literary fiction in fact-based journalism.

A Diamond Guitar

Breakfast at Tiffany's: A Short Novel and Three Stories (1958) brought together the title novella and three shorter tales: "House of Flowers", "A Diamond Guitar" and "A Christmas Memory".
"A Diamond Guitar" is a short story by Truman Capote, first published in Harper's Bazaar in 1950; it is noted as one of his better quality early short stories.

Brooklyn Heights: A Personal Memoir

A House on the Heights
In this period he also wrote an autobiographical essay for Holiday Magazine—one of his personal favorites—about his life in Brooklyn Heights in the late 1950s, entitled Brooklyn Heights: A Personal Memoir (1959).
Brooklyn Heights: A Personal Memoir is an autobiographical essay by Truman Capote about his life in Brooklyn in the late 1950s.

The Muses Are Heard

Traveling through the Soviet Union with a touring production of Porgy and Bess, he produced a series of articles for The New Yorker that became his first book-length work of nonfiction, The Muses Are Heard (1956).
The Muses Are Heard is an early journalistic work of Truman Capote.