Tufts University

Tufts College, c. 1854
Jumbo in the Barnum Museum of Natural History
Walnut Hill as it appeared prior to the construction of Tisch Library and steps, circa 1910. In the center is Eaton Hall. The road to the right no longer exists.
Sophia Gordon Hall (2006) is Tufts' newest residence hall
Foreign Ministers Boris Johnson (United Kingdom), Federica Mogherini (European Union), Paolo Gentiloni (Italy), Frank-Walter Steinmeier (Germany) and Jean-Marc Ayrault (France) with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaking at Tufts University, September 2016
Packard Hall
Goddard Chapel
Eaton Hall
East Hall
Memorial Steps
Jean Mayer Administration Building, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
The Tufts European Center on the Talloires campus
Gifford House, residence of the President
Anderson Hall, the School of Engineering
Arnold Wing, the School of Medicine
Goddard Hall, the Fletcher School
Bendetson Hall, on the Medford/Somerville campus, houses the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
Carmichael Hall on the Residence Quad
Entrance to Tisch Library, the main library on campus
Ginn Library at the Fletcher School
Aidekman Arts Center, Tufts University
Student protest for fossil fuel divestment
Stratton Hall, a downhill residence hall
West Hall, an uphill residence hall
The Tufts cannon, repainted almost nightly during the academic year, is here painted in response to the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan
Eugene Fama, Nobel Prize-winning economist (B.A. 1960)
Roderick MacKinnon, Nobel Prize in Chemistry recipient (M.D. 1982)
Juan Manuel Santos, President of Colombia and recipient of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize (MA, 1981)
Victor McKusick, geneticist, known as the father of medical genetics (COL, 1943)
Vannevar Bush, inventor and science administrator, founder of Raytheon (BS, 1913; MS, 1913)
Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase (BA, 1978)
Pierre Omidyar, founder of eBay (BS, 1988)
Dov Charney, Founder and CEO of American Apparel (Did not graduate)
Susan Decker, Former president of Yahoo! Inc. (B.S. 1984)
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., Publisher of The New York Times (BA, 1974)
Joi Ito, Japanese entrepreneur, former director of MIT Media Lab (COL, 1985)
Norbert Wiener, child prodigy and youngest Tufts graduate (BA, 1909)
Shashi Tharoor, former Under-Secretary General at the United Nations (MA, 1976; Ph.D, 1978)
Joseph Dunford, 19th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Scott Brown, Diplomat and United States Senator for Massachusetts (B.A. 1981)
Daniel Patrick Moynihan, U.S. Senator from New York (BS, 1948; MA, 1949; PhD, 1961)
Arjun Narsingh KC, Nepali Politician and Former Health and Education Minister (Fellowship, 1982)
Tracy Chapman, Grammy Award-winning artist (BA, 1986)
Michelle Kwan, American figure skater and two time Olympic medalist (MA, 2011)
Meredith Vieira, American journalist, talk show and game show host (BA, 1975)
Gordon Wood, historian, Pulitzer Prize winning author (BA, 1955)
Peter Gallagher, American actor, musician, and writer (BA,1977)
William Hurt, Academy Award-winning actor (B.A. 1972)
Hank Azaria, American actor, voice actor, comedian, and producer (BA, 1985)
Oliver Platt, Stage and screen actor (BA, 1983)
Jessica Biel, Actress (Did not graduate)
Rainn Wilson, Actor (Did not graduate)

Private research university on the border of Medford and Somerville, Massachusetts.

- Tufts University

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Jean Mayer

French-American scientist best known for his research on the physiological bases of hunger and the metabolism of essential nutrients, and for his role in shaping policy on world hunger at both the national and international levels.

French-American scientist best known for his research on the physiological bases of hunger and the metabolism of essential nutrients, and for his role in shaping policy on world hunger at both the national and international levels.

At Harvard University, he served as Master of Dudley House before leaving in 1976 to become the tenth President of Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, where he is given credit for having brought about an unprecedented rise in the university's national reputation.

Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life

The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life (originally the University College of Citizenship and Public Service, or UCCPS) is a college of Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts.

Tufts College Dental and Medical Building 1907

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine

Private, American dental school located in the Chinatown neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, and is connected to Tufts Medical Center.

Private, American dental school located in the Chinatown neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, and is connected to Tufts Medical Center.

Tufts College Dental and Medical Building 1907
Tufts Dental Building in Boston from the South
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine pre-clinical simulation laboratory
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine five-story Vertical Expansion

It is one of the 8 graduate schools that comprise Tufts University.

The 2011-2012 Beelzebubs performing at the Hong Kong International A Cappella Festival 2012.

Beelzebubs

The 2011-2012 Beelzebubs performing at the Hong Kong International A Cappella Festival 2012.

The Tufts Beelzebubs, frequently referred to as "The Bubs", is a male a cappella group of students from Tufts University that performs a mix of pop, rock, R&B, and other types of music while spreading their motto of "Fun through Song."

A test train on the Red Bridge viaduct in January 2022

Green Line Extension

Construction project to extend the light rail Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) Green Line northwest into Somerville and Medford, two inner suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts.

Construction project to extend the light rail Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) Green Line northwest into Somerville and Medford, two inner suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts.

A test train on the Red Bridge viaduct in January 2022
Map of the Green Line Extension
The Red Bridge viaduct, which connects the two branches with the viaduct to Lechmere and to the maintenance facility
Ball Square station under construction in July 2021
Lechmere station under construction in September 2021
Early-20th-century postcard of Somerville Junction station
Map of the 1945 extension proposals
The cost of modifying this bridge over Mystic Valley Parkway was cited as one of the reasons for eliminating West Medford as a possible terminus.
Press conference announcing the FFGA in January 2015
The scaled-down station designs were intended to resemble existing D branch surface stations like (pictured)
The proposed station site in 2022
A newly constructed building near Magoun Square station in 2019
Map of Phase I construction locations|alt=A map of the GLX corridor with the Medford Street bridge, Harvard Street bridge, and 21 Water Street circled
Somerville mayor Joseph Curtatone at the 2012 groundbreaking ceremony|alt=Joseph Curtatone speaking at a podium
Demolition of the 21 Water Street facility in August 2014|alt=A cinderblock building being demolished by an excavator
Harvard Street bridge work in July 2015|alt=A crane lifting a steel beam onto a bridge
Type 9 LRV on its first day of service in 2018|alt=A modern light rail vehicle at an underground station
Brush clearing on the Medford Branch in April 2018|alt=Brush being fed into a wood chipper next to a railway line
Broadway bridge under reconstruction in March 2019|alt=A bridge being demolished by four excavators
An ironworker on the Red Bridge viaduct in September 2019|alt=A worker atop a partially complete bridge
The frame of the Vehicle Maintenance Facility in May 2020|alt=A metal frame for a large building
The new Lechmere station under construction in May 2020|alt=An overhead view of a partially built elevated railway station
Demolition of the northern section of the Lechmere Viaduct in June 2020|alt=Water being sprayed onto an excavator demolishing an elevated railway viaduct
Union Square station with canopy frame in November 2020|alt=A railway station platform with the frame of a metal canopy
Ramp for the Somerville Community Path in July 2021|alt=A concrete ramp under construction next to a railway line
Magoun Square station nearing completion in December 2021|alt=A light rail station under construction in an open cut

) An extension to Tufts University was listed as a proposal in the 1978 and 1983 updates to the Program for Mass Transportation.

Barnum Museum of Natural History

Barnum Hall today
Tufts Jumbo statue commemorating the site of the museum
Surviving fragments of Jumbo from the conflagration

The Barnum Museum of Natural History was a natural history museum on the grounds of Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts.

Goddard Hall (Tufts University)

Interior of Goddard Hall now Ginn Library

Goddard Hall, originally known as Goddard Gymnasium, is a historic academic building on the campus of Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts.

Tisch Library

Tisch Library, originally Wessell Library, is the principal library for the Medford/Somerville campus of Tufts University.

The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability and demand. The graph depicts an increase (that is, right-shift) in demand from D1 to D2 along with the consequent increase in price and quantity required to reach a new equilibrium point on the supply curve (S).

Lawrence Bacow

American lawyer, economist, author and university administrator, and the current and 29th president of Harvard University.

American lawyer, economist, author and university administrator, and the current and 29th president of Harvard University.

The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability and demand. The graph depicts an increase (that is, right-shift) in demand from D1 to D2 along with the consequent increase in price and quantity required to reach a new equilibrium point on the supply curve (S).

From 2001 to 2011, Bacow served as the 12th president of Tufts University.

Arms of the University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

Private Ivy League research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Private Ivy League research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Arms of the University of Pennsylvania
Benjamin Franklin was the primary founder, benefactor, President of the board of trustees, and a trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia, which merged with the University of the State of Pennsylvania to form the University of Pennsylvania in 1791 (Joseph Duplessis, c. 1785).
Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania
This statue of Benjamin Franklin, donated by Justus C. Strawbridge to the City of Philadelphia in 1899, now sits in front of College Hall.
Academy and College of Philadelphia (c. 1780), 4th and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, proposed and started to be built in 1740 as home of a charity school (including Dormitory built 1762, sketch circa 1770), whose debts and inactive trusts were assumed in 1750 by a school that became the University of Pennsylvania and used for that purpose from 1751 to 1801.
1755 Charter creating the College of Philadelphia
House intended for the President of the United States from Birch's Views of Philadelphia (1800), home of the University of Pennsylvania from 1801 to 1829
Ticket to a lecture given by Penn Medical School Professor Benjamin Rush
Ninth Street Campus (above Chestnut Street) image of Medical Hall taken in 1872, just before Penn moved to West Philadelphia
Ninth Street Campus (above Chestnut Street) in stereographic image: Medical Hall (left) and College Hall (right), both built 1829–1830
View looking Southwest to "College Hall" and then Logan Hall from corner of 34th Street and Woodland Avenue to intersection of 36th Street, Woodland Avenue and Locust Street (with trolley tracks visible on Woodland Avenue) circa 1892
University of Pennsylvania campus map, West Philadelphia published in 1915 by Rand McNally
Illustration of University of Pennsylvania campus from a Brief Guide to Philadelphia (1918)
Penn's first purpose built dormitory, in the foreground to the right of the classroom building, was built in 1765
Phi Delta Theta and Kappa Sigma
Psi Upsilon Fraternity a.k.a. The Castle
"The Upper Quad" (originally "The Triangle" or formally, "The Men's Dormitory"), taken from area near Brooks-Leidy portion (not visible in photo) of the Memorial Tower (dedicated in 1901 to the alumni who died in the Spanish-American War ) with the earliest buildings (including New York Alumni and Carruth) completed by 1895, now part of Fisher–Hassenfeld College House, facing to the left and buildings completed by 1906, now part of Ware College House, to the right of the tower.
Houston Hall, first college student union in United States
Franklin Institute's chief meteorologist, Dr. Jon Nese (left) and his production crew from WHYY-TV (right) pose in front of a portion of the original ENIAC computer, in the ENIAC museum on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania.
1757 Seal of the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania
Overlooking Lower Quad from Upper Quad
Franklin Field upon completion of 2nd tier in 1925.
Exterior of the Palestra in April 2007
Upper Quad Gate forming lower part of Memorial Tower (honoring the veterans of the Spanish American War)
View towards Center City Philadelphia over the University of Pennsylvania Campus Historic District with Huntsman Hall in the foreground
Wistar Institute's 7-story steel and glass 2014 building located next to brick 1897 building, both on Penn's main historic campus on North side of Spruce Street between 36th and 37th streets
Morris Arboretum
South Brook Farm (1st portion built in 1717 for Caleb Pusey), which University of Pennsylvania purchased in 1952 for its School of Veterinary Medicine (now known as New Bolton Center)
Fisher Fine Arts Library, also referred to as the Furness Library or simply the Fine Arts Library
Furness library circa 1915
1st floor Plan from 1891 for Penn's first stand alone library building as published in the Proceedings at the Opening of the University of Pennsylvania Library (1891)
Historic Interior of reading room of Penn's Fine Arts Library designed by Frank Furness
Van Pelt Library, Penn's Main Library
Simone Leigh creating (on February 26, 2019 in Philadelphia), a sculpture similar to her monumental 'Brick House' work.
June 2012 photo of the Covenant designed by artist Alexander Liberman and installed at Penn in 1975
March 2007 photo of Love created by Robert Indiana and installed in 1998 at Penn (as shown in photo, due South of Alpha Chapter of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity also known as 'Skulls')
Sculpture of Young Ben Franklin depicting Franklin's arrival in Philadelphia as a 17-year-old immigrant from Boston of Massachusetts Bay Colony
University Museum and Warden Garden
Sphinx of Ramses II at the great temple of Ptah in Memphis circa 1200 BC
Penn Museum's black granite statue of Goddess Sekhmet excavated in Thebes in Ramesseum 1405-1367 BCE (Late 18th Dynasty) Egypt
Institute of Contemporary Art (popularly known as the ICA) is located just South of the Graduate Towers (residence hall for graduate and professional students) at corner of 36th Street and Sansom Street
Hill College House (photo taken in October 2010), University of Pennsylvania dormitory, designed, in 1958 to (house and cloister only female students) and resemble a castle with a drawbridge and moat, by Eero Saarinen, FAIA (who also designed the St. Louis Arch, the former TWA Flight Center at New York City's Kennedy Airport, and Dulles Airport).
'The Quad', formerly known as The Men's Dormitory, in photo taken (looking West from 'Lower Quad' to 'Junior Balcony') on Ides of March in 2014
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, built by George W. Childs Drexel as one of two mansions for his daughters
Smith Walk, view of Towne Building and Engineering Quad
Founded in 1751 by Benjamin Franklin and Dr. Thomas Bond, Pennsylvania Hospital is now part of University of Pennsylvania Health System and is the earliest established hospital in the United States, with the country's oldest surgical amphitheater.
Claudia Cohen Hall, formerly Logan Hall, home of the College of Arts and Sciences and former home of the Wharton School and originally, the medical school
ENIAC, the first general-purpose electronic computer, was born at Penn in 1946.
Julian Abele first African American graduate of University of Pennsylvania School of Design
Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander was the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in economics in the United States, to receive a law degree from Penn Law, and to practice law in Pennsylvania.
Alan L. Hart, MD, (on the right side of photo from EuroPride 2019 event) a Penn Med alumnus who was one of the first trans-men in United States to have a hysterectomy.
Edgar Fahs Smith (1854-1928) who was Penn provost from 1911 through 1920
Philomathean Society Graduation Diploma For Isaac Norton Jr., 1858.
the Philomathean Society Presidential library named after United States President and Penn Med alumnus William Henry Harrison
34th Street Logo (after 2017 Update)
The 1915–1916 Penn Glee Club
The band in 2019
Penn Band at 2019 Homecoming game
Penn Masala concert at the World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia
Maxfield Parrish's illustration of the winter 1895–1896 Mask and Wig program. Parrish also made mural and other art for Mask and Wig Clubhouse.
Mask and Wig Clubhouse (aka Welsh Coachhouse & Stable), 310 South Quince Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (stable built between 1843 and 1853, remodeled into clubhouse by Wilson Eyre Jr. 1894, altered by Eyre 1901), murals by Maxfield Parrish
1843 photo of University of Pennsylvania cricket team's first cricket ground, which was leased from the Union Club for regular periodic use by the Penn cricket team in 1846
George Patterson, president (in 1877) of University of Pennsylvania Cricket Team
Penn's eight-oared crew, 1901, first "foreign" crew to reach the final of the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley Royal Regatta
Penn Varsity rowers in 1911
Joe Burk (Wharton class of 1934 and crew coach 1950–1969), named "world's greatest oarsman" in 1938
The 1878 Penn Rugby team (Note that there are 15 players (plus a coach in top hat), as rugby teams fielded sides of 15, and the elongated ellipsoidal rugby ball (i.e., a prolate spheroid), designed for lateraling to the side and back and kicking, as it was and is against the rules in rugby football to pass the ball forward).
John Heisman (Penn Law class of 1892) rugby football player, posing at Penn in 1891 holding elongated ellipsoidal rugby ball (using gestures very close to the now-famous "Heisman Pose" gestures where a player extends the arm out in a stiff arm motion, holds the ball close to their body, and, in action not shown by Heisman, lifts one knee up; gestures all legal under both rugby and, later, gridiron football codes) (from Oberlin College)
Lithograph of University of Pennsylvania Rugby player (notice the ellipsoidal shape of the prolate spheroid ball that makes forward passes difficult) created in 1907 by F. Earl Christy
USA Olympic rugby team playing French Olympic rugby team on May 18, 1924, in the final rugby game of 1924 Olympics where USA team, led by player coach and Penn alumnus, Alan Valentine, won the gold medal.
Franklin Field, home to football, field hockey, lacrosse and track and field
Chuck Bednarik (aka "Concrete Charlie") excelled as a center on offense and a linebacker on defense, was a three-time All-American, and was inducted to the College and Pro Halls of Fame.
Senior Mark Zoller cuts down part of net after Penn clinched Ivy League title and trip to NCAA Tournament with an 86–68 victory over Yale on March 2, 2007, at the Palestra
Palestra interior in 2016
The winners of Men's Medley relay team that won Olympic gold medals at the 1908 London Olympics. Left to right, Nate Cartmell (University of Pennsylvania alumnus), John Taylor, (University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (class of 1908), first black athlete in America to win a gold medal, Mel Sheppard, and William Hamilton.
University of Pennsylvania Men's Track team that was the 1907 IC4A point winner: Left to right: Guy Haskins, R.C. Folwell, T.R. Moffitt, John Baxter Taylor, Jr. (the first black athlete in America to win a gold medal in the Olympics), Nathaniel Cartmell, and seated, J.D. Whitham
Alvin Kraenzlein (Penn Dental School class of 1900) four-time gold medal winner in track events at the 1900 Olympic Games
George Orton, MA (Penn's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences class of 1894), Ph.D. (Penn Graduate School class of 1896), who spoke 9 languages and won 17 U.S. National Track and Field titles, was the first disabled athlete to win an Olympic gold "medal" in 1900 Olympics in Paris.
The Pennsylvania Hospital as painted by Pavel Svinyin in 1811|alt=
Perelman School of Medicine|alt=
Penn School of Dental Medicine|alt=
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (facing northwest towards front entrance)|alt=
Penn owned Princeton Medical Center, eastern facade|alt=
Francis Hopkinson, signed the Declaration of Independence and designed the first official American flag.
George Clymer, Founding Father; early advocate for complete independence from Britain
James Wilson, Founding Father; one of the six original justices appointed by George Washington to the Supreme Court of the United States
Benjamin Rush, Founding Father; surgeon general of the Continental Army
William Henry Harrison, 9th president of the United States
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States
Martha Hughes Cannon, first female state senator elected in the United States
Ed Rendell, 45th governor of Pennsylvania; 96th mayor of Philadelphia
Jon Huntsman Jr., politician, businessman, and diplomat
Arlen Specter, former U.S. senator, majored in international relations and graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1951.
William Brennan Jr., Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court
Kwame Nkrumah, first president of Ghana, and previously first prime minister of Ghana
Drew Gilpin Faust, 28th president of Harvard University
Doc Holliday, famed gunslinger, attended the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery.
William Wrigley, Jr., founder and eponym of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
Physician and poet William Carlos Williams graduated from Penn's School of Medicine
Ezra Pound, poet and critic; a major figure in the early modernist poetry movement
Noam Chomsky studied philosophy and linguistics at Penn, graduating with a BA in 1949, an MA in 1951 and a Ph.D. in 1955.
Warren Buffett, successful investor<ref>{{cite web|title=Ten great investors|url=http://www.incademy.com/courses/ten-great-investors/-warren-buffett/1/1040/10002|website=Incademy Investor Education|publisher=Harriman House Ltd.|access-date=November 20, 2015|url-status=dead|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20151120201106/http://www.incademy.com/courses/ten-great-investors/-warren-buffett/1/1040/10002|archive-date=November 20, 2015}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last=Farrington |first=Robert |title=The top 10 investors of all time |url=http://thecollegeinvestor.com/972/the-top-10-investors-of-all-time/ |website=The College Investor |date=April 22, 2011 |access-date=November 20, 2015 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20151120150833/http://thecollegeinvestor.com/972/the-top-10-investors-of-all-time/ |archive-date=November 20, 2015|url-status=live}}</ref>
Donald Arthur Norman, co-founder of the Nielsen Norman Group,<ref name="FABBS-Norman">{{Cite web|url=https://fabbs.org/our_scientists/donald-norman-phd/|title=In Honor Of... Donald Norman |website=Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS) |language=en|access-date=September 13, 2020}}</ref> an IDEO fellow, and researcher and advocate of user-centered design
Elon Musk, a founder, CEO or both of all of: PayPal,<ref name="He Won't Back Down: Elon Musk">Preer, Robert (September 1, 2010). "He Won't Back Down: Elon Musk" {{Webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20161108055754/http://whartonmagazine.com/issues/fall-2010/he-wont-back-down/ |date=November 8, 2016}}, Wharton Magazine.</ref> Tesla,<ref name="knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu">"Entrepreneur Elon Musk: Why It's Important to Pinch Pennies on the Road to Riches" {{Webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20170714104730/http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/entrepreneur-elon-musk-why-its-important-to-pinch-pennies-on-the-road-to-riches/ |date=July 14, 2017}}, Knowledge@Wharton, May 27, 2009.</ref> SpaceX,<ref name="SpaceX Leadership: Elon Musk">SpaceX Leadership: Elon Musk {{webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20140516101427/http://www.spacex.com/about/leadership |date=May 16, 2014}}, SpaceX, November 21, 2011.</ref> OpenAI, The Boring Company and Neuralink
Tory Burch, fashion designer and founder of Tory Burch LLC
John Legend, musician and recipient of Academy, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Awards
Stanley B. Prusiner, neurologist and biochemist, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Christian B. Anfinsen, biochemist, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry
I. M. Pei, Pritzker Prize-winning architect

According to a U.S. News article in 2010, Penn is tied for second (tied with Dartmouth College and Tufts University) for the number of undergraduate alumni who are current Fortune 100 CEOs.