Tuning fork

tuning forkstuning-forkDiapasonstines
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).wikipedia
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Musical tuning

tuningtunedtuning system
They are traditional sources of standard pitch for tuning musical instruments. Tuning forks have traditionally been used to tune musical instruments, though electronic tuners have largely replaced them.
A tuning fork or electronic tuning device may be used as a reference pitch, though in ensemble rehearsals often a piano is used (as its pitch cannot be adjusted for each performance).

Musical acoustics

acousticAcoustic Designacoustics
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).
Pure tones can be produced by tuning forks or whistling.

Concert pitch

concert Apitch standardconcert
Currently, the most common tuning fork sounds the note of A = 440 Hz, the standard concert pitch that many orchestras use.
From the early 18th century, pitch could be also controlled with the use of tuning forks (invented in 1711), although again there was variation.

John Shore (trumpeter)

John ShoreSHORE, JOHN
The tuning fork was invented in 1711 by British musician John Shore, Sergeant trumpeter and lutenist to the court.
He invented the tuning fork in 1711.

Rhodes piano

Fender RhodesRhodesFender Rhodes electric piano
The most popular of these is the Rhodes piano, in which hammers hit metal tines that vibrate in the magnetic field of a pickup, creating a signal that drives electric amplification.
Like a piano, it generates sound using keys and hammers, but instead of strings, the hammers strike thin metal tines, which are then amplified via an electromagnetic pickup which is plugged into an external keyboard amplifier and speaker.

Resonator

resonant cavityresonatorscavity resonator
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).
Common designs consist of electrodes attached to a piece of quartz, in the shape of a rectangular plate for high frequency applications, or in the shape of a tuning fork for low frequency applications.

Dulcitone

dulctione
The earlier, un-amplified dulcitone, which used tuning forks directly, suffered from low volume.
A dulcitone is a keyboard instrument in which sound is produced by a range of tuning forks, which vibrate when struck by felt-covered hammers activated by the keyboard.

Node (physics)

nodenodesantinode
There is a node (point of no vibration) at the base of each prong.
*Free boundary: Examples of this type are an open-ended organ or woodwind pipe, the ends of the vibrating resonator bars in a xylophone, glockenspiel or tuning fork, the ends of an antenna, or a transmission line with an open end.

Crystal oscillator

crystalquartz oscillatorquartz crystal
The quartz crystal that serves as the timekeeping element in modern quartz clocks and watches is in the form of a tiny tuning fork.
Low-frequency crystals, such as those used in digital watches, are typically cut in the shape of a tuning fork.

Electric watch

electromechanical watchelectronic watchelectronic watches
The Accutron, an electromechanical watch developed by Max Hetzel and manufactured by Bulova beginning in 1960, used a 360-hertz steel tuning fork as its timekeeper, powered by electromagnets attached to a battery-powered transistor oscillator circuit.
Their timekeeping element was either a traditional balance wheel or a tuning fork, driven electromagnetically by a solenoid powered by a battery.

Quartz clock

quartz watchquartzquartz movement
The quartz crystal that serves as the timekeeping element in modern quartz clocks and watches is in the form of a tiny tuning fork.
In modern quartz clocks, the quartz crystal resonator or oscillator is in the shape of a small tuning fork (XY-cut), laser-trimmed or precision lapped to vibrate at 32768 Hz. This frequency is equal to 2 15 cycles per second.

Bulova

Bulova Watch CompanyAccutronBulova Watch Co.
The Accutron, an electromechanical watch developed by Max Hetzel and manufactured by Bulova beginning in 1960, used a 360-hertz steel tuning fork as its timekeeper, powered by electromagnets attached to a battery-powered transistor oscillator circuit.
Its horological innovations included the watch, which used a resonating tuning fork as a means of regulating the time-keeping function.

Acupuncture

acupuncturistacupuncture pointacupuncture points
Tuning forks also play a role in several alternative therapy practices, such as sonopuncture and polarity therapy.
Sonopuncture is a stimulation of the body similar to acupuncture using sound instead of needles. This may be done using purpose-built transducers to direct a narrow ultrasound beam to a depth of 6–8 centimetres at acupuncture meridian points on the body. Alternatively, tuning forks or other sound emitting devices are used.

Savart wheel

Savart wheel
For practical purposes Hooke's device was soon supplanted by the invention of the tuning fork.

Vibrating structure gyroscope

gyroscopic sensorgyro control systemMEMS gyroscopes
Doubled and H-type tuning forks are used for tactical-grade Vibrating Structure Gyroscopes and various types of microelectromechanical systems.
Modern variants of tactical gyros use doubled tuning forks such as those produced by American manufacturer Systron Donner in California and French manufacturer Safran Electronics & Defense / Safran Group.

Rinne test

Rinne
This is most commonly done with two exams called the Weber test and Rinne test, respectively.
The Rinne test is performed by placing a 512 Hz vibrating tuning fork against the patient's mastoid bone and asking the patient to tell you when the sound is no longer heard.

Pitch pipe

pitch-pipepitch pipes
Pitch pipe
They are now quite rare, and hardly ever used for what they were intended, but may still be used as an alternative to a tuning fork.

Weber test

Weber
This is most commonly done with two exams called the Weber test and Rinne test, respectively.
In the Weber test a vibrating tuning fork (Typically 256 Hz or 512 Hz used for Weber vibration test; 512 Hz used for Rinne hearing test) is placed in the middle of the forehead, above the upper lip under the nose over the teeth, or on top of the head equi-distant from the patient's ears on top of thin skin in contact with the bone.

Electronic tuner

strobe tunerstrobe tunerstuner
Tuning forks have traditionally been used to tune musical instruments, though electronic tuners have largely replaced them.
Tuning fork

Johann Scheibler

Tonometer
Tonometer
He made a "tonometer" (Tonmesser) from 56 tuning forks as an instrument for accurately measuring pitch by counting beating, described in 1834.

Fork

dinner forkforkssalad fork
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).

Tine (structural)

tinetinesprong
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).

Deformation (engineering)

deformationplastic deformationdeformed
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).

Steel

steel industrysteelworkersteels
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel).

Acoustic resonance

resonanceresonatorresonant
It resonates at a specific constant pitch when set vibrating by striking it against a surface or with an object, and emits a pure musical tone once the high overtones fade out.