Tunisian Arabic

TunisianaebTunisian languageTunisiaTunisian dialectSahili
Tunisian Arabic, or Tunisian, is a set of dialects of Maghrebi Arabic spoken in Tunisia.wikipedia
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Tunisian Arabic morphology

morphology
Tunisian Arabic's morphology, syntax, pronunciation, and vocabulary are considerably different from Modern Standard Arabic or Classical Arabic to such an extent that it is not mutually intelligible with either.
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.

Judeo-Tunisian Arabic

Judeo-TunisianTunisian-Judeo-Arabicits own dialect of Arabic
However, some dialects avoided the Hilalian influence: Judeo-Tunisian Arabic, a vernacular spoken by Tunisian Jews and known for the conservation of foreign phonemes in loanwords and slightly influenced by Hebrew phonology, Sfax dialect and Tunisian urban woman dialect.
Judeo-Tunisian Arabic, also known as Djerbian Arabic, is a variety of Tunisian Arabic mainly spoken by Jews living or formerly living in Tunisia.

Varieties of Arabic

variety of ArabicArabic dialectsvariety
Tunisian Arabic is mostly intelligible to speakers of other Maghrebi dialects but is hard to understand or is unintelligible for speakers of Middle Eastern Arabic.
Tunisian Arabic ( الدارجة /تونسي - tūnsī/ derja)

Maghrebi Arabic

MaghrebiArabicNorth African dialects
Tunisian Arabic, or Tunisian, is a set of dialects of Maghrebi Arabic spoken in Tunisia. It is a variety of Maghrebi Arabic like Moroccan and Algerian Arabic, which are mostly unintelligible to Modern Standard or Mashriqi Arabic speakers.
It includes Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Libyan, and Hassaniya Arabic.

Maltese language

Maltesemltmt
Moreover, Tunisian Arabic is closely related to Maltese, which is a separate language that descended from Tunisian and Siculo-Arabic.
A recent study shows that, in terms of basic everyday language, speakers of Maltese are able to understand less than a third of what is said to them in Tunisian Arabic, which is related to Siculo-Arabic, whereas speakers of Tunisian are able to understand about 40% of what is said to them in Maltese.

Voiced velar stop

voiced velar plosivegɡ
In fact, central and western Tunisian Arabic speakers began using the voiced velar stop [ɡ] instead of the voiceless uvular stop [q] in words such as qāl "he said".

Mizwad

mezouedzokraMizwid
At the same time, popular music developed in the early 19th century, using Tunisian Arabic poems accompanied by Tunisian musical instruments like the mizwad.
The mizwad (mezoued, mizwid) (Tunisian Arabic : مِزْود; plural مَزاود mazāwid, literally "sack," “bag,” or “food pouch”) is a type of bagpipes played in Tunisia, Chakwa in East of Algeria.

Arabic

Arabic-languageArabArabic:
Tunisian Arabic is one of the Arabic languages within the Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family.
Tunisian Arabic spoken in Tunisia and North-eastern Algeria

Mutual intelligibility

mutually intelligiblemutually unintelligibleintelligible
Tunisian Arabic's morphology, syntax, pronunciation, and vocabulary are considerably different from Modern Standard Arabic or Classical Arabic to such an extent that it is not mutually intelligible with either.
Maltese: Tunisian Arabic (significantly) and Sicilian (partially)

Tunisian Revolution

TunisiaJasmine Revolution2010–2011 Tunisian protests
After the Tunisian revolution of 2011 when Tunisian Arabic was the mainly used language of communication, the supporters of the recognition of Tunisian as a language were encouraged to work again about the issue.
The name adopted in Tunisia was the Dignity Revolution, which is a translation of the Tunisian Arabic name for the revolution ثورة الكرامة (). Within Tunisia, Ben Ali's rise to power in 1987 was also known as the Jasmine Revolution.

List of Latin-script alphabets

extended Latin alphabetextended Latin
Its system was a phonemic transcription of Arabic written with an extended Latin alphabet and macrons for long vowels.
Among alphabets for natural languages the Afrikaans,[54] Aromanian, Aymara, Basque,[4] Breton, British, Catalan,[6] Cornish, Czech,[8] Danish,[9] Dutch,[10] Emilian-Romagnol, English,[36] Estonian, Extremaduran, Fala, Filipino,[11] Finnish, French,[12], Fula,[41] Galician,[33] German,[13] Greenlandic, Hungarian,[15] Indonesian, Italian, Karakalpak,[23] Kazakh,[38] Kurdish, Modern Latin, Luxembourgish, Malay, Mirandese, Norwegian,[9], Portuguese, Quechua, Rhaeto-Romance, Romanian, Slovak,[24], Spanish,[25] Swedish, Tswana,[52] Tunisian Arabic,[58], Uyghur, Venda,[51] Võro, Walloon,[27] West Frisian, Xhosa, Zazaki, and Zulu alphabets include all 26 letters, at least in their largest version.

Andalusian Arabic

ArabicAndalusi ArabicHispano-Arabic
These migrants brought some of the characteristics of Andalusian Arabic to the sedentary urban dialects spoken in Tunisia.
It also exerted some influence on Mozarabic, Spanish (particularly Andalusian), Ladino, Catalan, Portuguese, Classical Arabic and the Moroccan, Tunisian, Hassani and Algerian Arabic dialects.

Tunisian people

TunisianTunisiansTunisian Arabs
Tunisian people or Tunisians (تونسيون Tūnisiyyūn, Twensa), are a Maghrebi ethnic group and nation native to North Africa, primarily Tunisia, who speak Tunisian (Derja) and share a common Tunisian culture and identity.

Tunisia

🇹🇳TUNTunisian
Tunisian Arabic, or Tunisian, is a set of dialects of Maghrebi Arabic spoken in Tunisia.
Arabic is the official language, and Tunisian Arabic, known as Tounsi, is the national, vernacular variety of Arabic and is used by the public.

Pre-Hilalian Arabic dialects

pre-Hilalianpre-hilalian dialectsearly Maghrebi Arabic
It has a considerable number of pre-hilalian dialects but is usually considered in its koiné form to be a mostly Hilalian variety of Maghrebi Arabic because it was affected by the immigration of Banu Hilal in the 11th century, as were the other Maghrebi varieties.
Sahili in the Sahel, Tunisia;

Établissement de la radiodiffusion-télévision tunisienne

ERTTEl WataniyaTunisian Radio and TV Establishment
Furthermore, the creation of the Établissement de la radiodiffusion-télévision tunisienne in 1966 and the nationwide spread of television with the contact of dialects led to a dialect leveling by the 1980s.
ERTT offers services in Tunisian Arabic, Arabic, French, Italian and Turkish.

Stratum (linguistics)

substratumsubstrateadstratum
Like other Maghrebi dialects, it has a vocabulary that is mostly Arabic with a significant Berber, Latin and possibly Neo-Punic substratum.

Algerian Arabic

AlgerianAlgeriaArabic, Algerian
As part of a dialect continuum, Tunisian merges into Algerian Arabic and Libyan Arabic at the borders of the country. It is a variety of Maghrebi Arabic like Moroccan and Algerian Arabic, which are mostly unintelligible to Modern Standard or Mashriqi Arabic speakers.
Tunisian Arabic

Libyan Arabic

LibyanWestern Egyptian Bedawi Arabicayl
As part of a dialect continuum, Tunisian merges into Algerian Arabic and Libyan Arabic at the borders of the country.
Tunisian Arabic

African Romance

African Romance LatinAfrican LatinAfrican Romance language
This also progressively gave birth to African Romance, a Latin dialect, influenced by Tunisia's other languages and used along with them.
Tunisian Arabic

Tunisian diaspora

emigration
Multilingualism within Tunisia and in the Tunisian diaspora makes it common for Tunisians to code-switch, mixing Tunisian with French, English, Standard Arabic or other languages in daily speech.
In Tunisia, free courses of instruction in Tunisian Arabic are organised during the summer holidays for the children of Tunisian residents abroad, who are heavily influenced by the culture of the countries in which they live.

Beylik of Tunis

TunisTunisiaFrench protectorate
The effective beginning of Tunisian Arabic written songs came in the early 19th century, when Tunisian Jews in the Beylik of Tunis began writing songs in Tunisian Arabic about love, betrayal and other libertine subjects.

Moroccan Arabic

MoroccanArabicMoroccan dialect
It is a variety of Maghrebi Arabic like Moroccan and Algerian Arabic, which are mostly unintelligible to Modern Standard or Mashriqi Arabic speakers.
Tunisian Arabic

French protectorate of Tunisia

TunisiaFrench protectorateFrench Tunisia
During the French protectorate of Tunisia, the country encountered the Standard French language.

Arabic script

ArabicArabic alphabetPersian-Arabic script
– Ga, used to represent the voiced velar plosive in Algerian and Tunisian.