Tunisian Arabic morphology

morphology
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.wikipedia
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Tunisian Arabic

TunisianaebDarija
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.
Tunisian Arabic's morphology, syntax, pronunciation, and vocabulary are considerably different from Modern Standard Arabic or Classical Arabic.

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.

French conjugation

Frenchconjugaisonconjugation in French
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.

Morphology (linguistics)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.

Maghrebi Arabic

MaghrebiArabicDarija
The grammar, the conjugaison and the morphology of Tunisian Arabic is very similar to that of other Maghrebi Arabic varieties.

Classical Arabic

ArabicClassicalar
It is based on Classical Arabic and influenced by Berber languages and Latin, with some morphological inventions.

Berber languages

BerberAmazighTamazight
It is based on Classical Arabic and influenced by Berber languages and Latin, with some morphological inventions. The future tense in Tunisian Arabic is also similar to Berber, more precisely Zenata Berber that was spoken by the majority of Tunisians ancestors: Passive: This derivation is influenced by Berber and is different from the one of Classical Arabic (the passive voice in classical Arabic uses vowel changes and not verb derivation), it is obtained by prefixing the verb with (First letter in the root as Moon Consonant), (First letter in the root as Sun Consonant), (can efficiently substitute tt- when the verb is conjugated in Present Tense) or (can efficiently substitute t- when the verb is conjugated in Present Tense):

Latin

Lat.Latin languagelat
It is based on Classical Arabic and influenced by Berber languages and Latin, with some morphological inventions.

Grammatical person

personthird personfirst person
Standard Arabic marks 13 person/number/gender distinctions in the verbal paradigm, whereas the dialect of Tunis marks only 7 (the gender distinction is found only in the third person singular).

Grammatical number

numbersingularnumbers
Standard Arabic marks 13 person/number/gender distinctions in the verbal paradigm, whereas the dialect of Tunis marks only 7 (the gender distinction is found only in the third person singular).

Grammatical gender

genderfemininemasculine
Standard Arabic marks 13 person/number/gender distinctions in the verbal paradigm, whereas the dialect of Tunis marks only 7 (the gender distinction is found only in the third person singular).

Verb

verbsv.verbal morphology
Standard Arabic marks 13 person/number/gender distinctions in the verbal paradigm, whereas the dialect of Tunis marks only 7 (the gender distinction is found only in the third person singular).

Inflection

inflectedinflectional morphologyinflect
Standard Arabic marks 13 person/number/gender distinctions in the verbal paradigm, whereas the dialect of Tunis marks only 7 (the gender distinction is found only in the third person singular).

Tunis

Tunis, TunisiaTunesTūnis تونس
Standard Arabic marks 13 person/number/gender distinctions in the verbal paradigm, whereas the dialect of Tunis marks only 7 (the gender distinction is found only in the third person singular).

Nomad

nomadicnomadssemi-nomadic
Nomadic Tunisian Arabic dialects also mark gender for the second person in singular, in common with most spoken varieties of Arabic elsewhere in the Arabic world.

Regular and irregular verbs

irregular verbirregular verbsirregular
In general, the regular verbs are conjugated according to the following pattern:

Grammatical conjugation

conjugationconjugatedconjugations
In general, the regular verbs are conjugated according to the following pattern:

Semivowel

glideglidessemi-vowel
Verbs with a final semivowel ā, known as "weak" verbs, have a different pattern.

Zenata

ZenagaIznatenSanhaja
The future tense in Tunisian Arabic is also similar to Berber, more precisely Zenata Berber that was spoken by the majority of Tunisians ancestors:

Causative

Causalcausative voicecausative verb
Causative: is obtained by doubling consonants :

Inchoative verb

inchoativeinchoativesbecome X
Inchoative: Adding ā between the last two radical consonants, e.g. ḥmār “turn red”

Passive voice

passivepassivizationpassives
Passive: This derivation is influenced by Berber and is different from the one of Classical Arabic (the passive voice in classical Arabic uses vowel changes and not verb derivation), it is obtained by prefixing the verb with (First letter in the root as Moon Consonant), (First letter in the root as Sun Consonant), (can efficiently substitute tt- when the verb is conjugated in Present Tense) or (can efficiently substitute t- when the verb is conjugated in Present Tense):

Dual (grammatical number)

dualdual numberdual form
Marking of the dual for nouns by adding -īn as a suffix to them is only used for quantity measures, for nouns having the CCVC form such as C is an ungeminated consonant and V is a short vowel and things often occurring in twos (e.g. eyes, hands, parents).