Tunumiit dialect

TunumiitEast GreenlandicTunumiisutTunumiit oraasiatEastern Greenlandic
Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic (Kalaallisut: tunumiusut, East Greenlandic: tunumiisut) is a variety of Greenlandic spoken in eastern Greenland by the Tunumiit.wikipedia
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Greenlandic language

GreenlandicKalaallisutGreenlandic Inuit
Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic (Kalaallisut: tunumiusut, East Greenlandic: tunumiisut) is a variety of Greenlandic spoken in eastern Greenland by the Tunumiit.
The second variety is Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic.

Kalaallisut

GreenlandicKalaallisut (West Greenland Inuit)Standard Greenlandic
Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic (Kalaallisut: tunumiusut, East Greenlandic: tunumiisut) is a variety of Greenlandic spoken in eastern Greenland by the Tunumiit.
Tunumiit and Inuktun are regional dialects of Greenlandic, spoken by a small minority of the population.

Tasiilaq

AngmagssalikAmassalikAmmassalik
The largest town where it is the primary language is Tasiilaq on Ammassalik Island, with the Island's name being derived from the West Greenlandic name of the town.
Tasiilaq is the main location where East Greenlandic is spoken.

Greenland

🇬🇱GreenlandicGL
Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic (Kalaallisut: tunumiusut, East Greenlandic: tunumiisut) is a variety of Greenlandic spoken in eastern Greenland by the Tunumiit.
This has led to its de facto status as the official "Greenlandic" language, although the northern dialect Inuktun remains spoken by 1,000 or so people around Qaanaaq, and the eastern dialect Tunumiisut by around 3,000.

Tunumiit

East Greenlandic
Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic (Kalaallisut: tunumiusut, East Greenlandic: tunumiisut) is a variety of Greenlandic spoken in eastern Greenland by the Tunumiit.
The Tunumiit language, also called East Greenlandic and Tunumiit oraasiat, is dialect of Greenlandic.

Inuit languages

InuitInuit languageInuktitut
Tunumiit oraasiat, the Tunumiit dialect, (or Tunumiisut in Greenlandic, often East Greenlandic in other languages), is the dialect of eastern Greenland. It differs sharply from other Inuit language variants and has roughly 3000 speakers according to Ethnologue.

Ammassalik Island

Ammassalik
The largest town where it is the primary language is Tasiilaq on Ammassalik Island, with the Island's name being derived from the West Greenlandic name of the town.

Ittoqqortoormiit

ScoresbysundIttoqqortoomit (Scoresbysund)
Ittoqqortoormiit (East Greenlandic) or Illoqqortoormiut (West Greenlandic), formerly known as Scoresbysund, is a settlement in the Sermersooq municipality in eastern Greenland.

Ulu

knifeknuckle blades
In the Nunatsiavummiutut variety of Inuttitut, which is spoken in Nunatsiavut, the word is spelled uluk, and in Tunumiit ("East Greenlandic") it is sakiaq or saakiq.

Languages of Greenland

GreenlandGreenlandic
The number of speakers of Greenlandic is estimated at 50,000 (85-90% of the total population), divided in three main dialects, Kalaallisut (West-Greenlandic, 44,000 speakers and the dialect that is used as official language), Tunumiit (East-Greenlandic, 3,000 speakers) and Inuktun (North-Greenlandic, 800 speakers).

Greenlandic Inuit

InuitGreenlandicEskimo
the Tunumiit of Tunu (east Greenland), who speak Tunumiit oraasiat ("East Greenlandic")

Inuit

InukEskimoEskimos
Since Inuktitut and Kalaallisut are the prestige dialects in Canada and Greenland, respectively, their version has become dominant, although every Inuit dialect uses cognates from the Proto-Eskimo *ińuɣ – for example, "people" is inughuit in North Greenlandic and iivit in East Greenlandic.

Demographics of Greenland

GreenlandersGreenlandicdetails
The number of speakers of Greenlandic is estimated at 50,000 (85-90% of the total population), divided in three main dialects, Kalaallisut (West-Greenlandic, 44,000 speakers and the dialect that is used as official language), Tunumiit (East-Greenlandic, 3,000 speakers) and Inuktun (North-Greenlandic, 800 speakers).

Eskimo

EsquimauxEsquimaux IndiansInuit
Eastern Greenlandic, at the opposite end of the Inuit range, has had significant word replacement due to a unique form of ritual name avoidance.