Turkic peoples

TurkicTurksTurkishTurkic peopleTurkTurkic ethnicityTurushkaTurkic expansionTurkic tribesTurkic tribe
The Turkic peoples are a collection of ethno-linguistic groups of Central, Eastern, Northern and Western Asia as well as parts of Europe and North Africa.wikipedia
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Uzbeks

UzbekUzbek peopleUzbeki
The most notable modern Turkic-speaking ethnic groups include Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Turkmens, Kyrgyz and Uyghur people. The ethnic name Kangar is a medieval name for the Kangly people, who are now part of the Kazakh, Uzbek, and Karakalpak nations.
The Uzbeks (Oʻzbek, Ўзбек, اوزبک, plural: Oʻzbeklar, Ўзбеклар, اوزبکلر) are a Turkic ethnic group native to Uzbekistan and wider Central Asia, being the largest Turkic ethnic group in the area.

Turkmens

TurkmenTurkomanTurcoman
The most notable modern Turkic-speaking ethnic groups include Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Turkmens, Kyrgyz and Uyghur people.
Turkmens (Türkmenler, Түркменлер, توركمنلر, ; historically also the Turkmen) are a nation and Turkic ethnic group native to Central Asia, primarily the Turkmen nation state of Turkmenistan.

Kyrgyz people

KyrgyzKirghizKyrgyzs
The most notable modern Turkic-speaking ethnic groups include Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Turkmens, Kyrgyz and Uyghur people.
The Kyrgyz people (also spelled Kyrghyz and Kirghiz) are a Turkic ethnic group native to Central Asia, primarily Kyrgyzstan.

Uyghurs

UyghurUighurUighurs
The most notable modern Turkic-speaking ethnic groups include Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Turkmens, Kyrgyz and Uyghur people.
The Uyghurs (, ; ئۇيغۇرلار, уйғурлар, ; undefined, ), alternately Uygurs, Uighurs or Uigurs, are a minority Turkic ethnic group originating from and culturally affiliated with the general region of Central and East Asia.

Azerbaijanis

AzerbaijaniAzeriAzeris
The most notable modern Turkic-speaking ethnic groups include Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Turkmens, Kyrgyz and Uyghur people.
Azerbaijanis or Azeris (Azərbaycanlılar آذربایجانلیلار, Azərilər آذریلر) are a Turkic people living mainly in the Iranian region of Azerbaijan and the sovereign (former Soviet) Republic of Azerbaijan.

Altai people

AltaiAltaiansAltay
The Sari Uygurs "Yellow Yughurs" of Western China, as well as the Tuvans and Altai of Russia are the only remaining Buddhist Turkic peoples.
The Altaian (also Altayans) are a Turkic people living in the Siberian Altai Republic and Altai Krai, Russia.

Crimean Tatars

Crimean TatarTatarTatars
The Autonomous Republic of Crimea within Ukraine is a home of Crimean Tatars.
Crimean Tatars (Crimean Tatar: Qırımtatarlar or qırımlar) or Crimean Tartars are a Turkic ethnic group and nation, who are indigenous people of Crimea and formed in the Crimean Peninsula during the 13th–17th centuries, primarily from Cumans that appeared in Crimea in the 10th century, with strong contributions from all the peoples who ever inhabited Crimea.

Gagauz people

GagauzGagauziansGagauzes
The major Christian-Turkic peoples are the Chuvash of Chuvashia and the Gagauz (Gökoğuz) of Moldova.
The Gagauzes are a Turkic people living mostly in southern Moldova (Gagauzia, Taraclia District, Basarabeasca District), southwestern Ukraine (Budjak), northeastern Bulgaria, Greece, Brazil, the United States and Canada.

Chulyms

ChulymChulym TatarsChulymtsy
The Chulyms, also Chulym Tatars, (self-designation: Чулымнар, Татарлар, Ӧс кижилер, Пестын кижилер) are a Turkic people in the Tomsk Oblast and Krasnoyarsk Krai in Russia.

Karakalpaks

KarakalpakKara-KalpakKarakalpak people
The ethnic name Kangar is a medieval name for the Kangly people, who are now part of the Kazakh, Uzbek, and Karakalpak nations.
The Karakalpaks or Qaraqalpaqs are a Turkic ethnic group native to Karakalpakstan in Northwestern Uzbekistan.

Kumyks

KumykKumykiaKumik
Kumyks are a Turkic people living in the Kumyk plateau (northern Dagestan and Chechnya), the lands bordering the Caspian Sea, Northern Ossetia, Chechnya and the banks of the Terek river.

Khalaj people

KhalajKhalachKhalji
The Khalaj people (also spelt Xalaj or Khaladzh; ) are primarily classified as a Turkic people that speak the Khalaj language.

Kazakhs

KazakhKazakh peopleKazakhstani
The most notable modern Turkic-speaking ethnic groups include Turkish people, Azerbaijanis, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Turkmens, Kyrgyz and Uyghur people. The ethnic name Kangar is a medieval name for the Kangly people, who are now part of the Kazakh, Uzbek, and Karakalpak nations.
The Kazakhs (also spelled Kazaks, Qazaqs; Kazakh: singular: Қазақ, Qazaq, plural: Қазақтар, Qazaqtar, ; the English name is transliterated from Russian) are a Turkic ethnic group who mainly inhabit the Ural Mountains and northern parts of Central Asia (largely Kazakhstan, but also parts of Russia, Uzbekistan, Mongolia and China), the region also known as the Eurasian sub-continent.

Salar people

SalarSalarsSalar Muslims
The Salar people are a Turkic ethnic minority of China who largely speak the Salar language, an Oghuz language.

Tatars

TatarTartarTatarian
The Cuman-Kipchak Confederation and Islamic Volga Bulgaria were absorbed by the Golden Horde in the 13th century; in the 14th century, Islam became the official religion under Uzbeg Khan where the general population (Turks) as well as the aristocracy (Mongols) came to speak the Kipchak language and were collectively known as "Tatars" by Russians and Westerners.
The Tatars are a Turkic ethnic group living mainly in Tatarstan and the wider Volga-Ural region.

Tuvans

TuvanTuviniansTuvinian
The Sari Uygurs "Yellow Yughurs" of Western China, as well as the Tuvans and Altai of Russia are the only remaining Buddhist Turkic peoples.
The Tuvans or Tuvinians (, Tıvalar; Тува, Tuva) are a Turkic ethnic group native to Tuva.

Bulgars

BulgarBulgarianProto-Bulgarians
The Bulgars established themselves in between the Caspian and Black Seas in the 5th and 6th centuries, followed by their conquerors, the Khazars who converted to Judaism in the 8th or 9th century. The Pechenegs, three of whose tribes were known as Kangar (Greek: Καγγαρ), after being defeated by the Oghuzes, Karluks, and Kimek-Kypchaks, attacked the Bulgars and established the Pecheneg state in Eastern Europe (840–990 CE).
The Bulgars (also Bulghars, Bulgari, Bolgars, Bolghars, Bolgari, Proto-Bulgarians ) were Turkic semi-nomadic warrior tribes that flourished in the Pontic–Caspian steppe and the Volga region during the 7th century.

Yakuts

YakutSakhaSakha people
The Yakuts or the Sakha (Sakha: Sakhalar) are a Turkic ethnic group who mainly live in the Republic of Sakha in the Russian Federation, with some extending to the Amur, Magadan, Sakhalin regions, and the Taymyr and Evenk Autonomous Districts.

Qashqai people

QashqaiQashqaisQashqa'i
Qashqai (pronounced ; also spelled Qashqa'i, 'Qashqay,' Kashkai, Kashkay, Qashqayı, Gashgai, Gashgay, Ghashghaei, in Persian: قشقایی) is a conglomeration of clans in Iran consisting of mostly Turkic peoples but also Lurs, Kurds and Arabs.

Onoğurs

OnogursOnogurOgur
The Onoğurs or Oğurs (Όνόγουροι, Οὒρωγοι; Onογurs, Ογurs; "ten tribes", "tribes"), were Turkic nomadic equestrians who flourished in the Pontic-Caspian steppe and the Volga region between 5th and 7th century, and spoke Oğhuric language.

Yugur

YugursUyghurYugur people
The Sari Uygurs "Yellow Yughurs" of Western China, as well as the Tuvans and Altai of Russia are the only remaining Buddhist Turkic peoples.
The Yugurs, Yughurs, Yugu, or Yellow Uyghurs, as they are traditionally known, are a Turkic and Mongolic group and one of China's 56 officially recognized ethnic groups, consisting of 13,719 persons according to the 2000 census.

Togarmah

ThargamosTorgomTargamos
There are references to certain groups in antiquity whose names could be the original form of "Türk/Türük" such as Togarma, Turukha/Turuška, Turukku and so on.
Medieval traditions variously claimed Togarmah as the mythical ancestor of peoples in the Caucasus and western Asia, including the Georgians, the Armenians and some Turkic peoples (i.e. Oghuzes, Khazars and Bulgars).

Oghuz Turks

TurkmenOghuzTurkmens
The Pechenegs, three of whose tribes were known as Kangar (Greek: Καγγαρ), after being defeated by the Oghuzes, Karluks, and Kimek-Kypchaks, attacked the Bulgars and established the Pecheneg state in Eastern Europe (840–990 CE).
The Oghuz, Oguz or Ghuzz Turks were western Turkic people who spoke the Oghuz languages from the Common branch of the Turkic language family.

Dingling

ChileTing-lingDinlin
Turkic people may be related to the Xiongnu, Dingling and Tiele people.
They are assumed to have been an early Proto-Turkic-speaking people, whose original constituents mainly assimilated into the Xiongnu and Xianbei groups.