Twelfth Night (holiday)

Twelfth Night12th NightRauhnächtethe twelfth day of ChristmasTwelfth Daytwelfth day of Christmas pageantTwelfth Night celebrationsTwelfth Night of ChristmasTwelfth Night partyTwelfth Night's entertainment
Twelfth Night is a festival in some branches of Christianity that takes place on the last night of the Twelve Days of Christmas, marking the coming of the Epiphany.wikipedia
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Epiphany (holiday)

EpiphanyTheophanyFeast of the Epiphany
Twelfth Night is a festival in some branches of Christianity that takes place on the last night of the Twelve Days of Christmas, marking the coming of the Epiphany. Around the world, special pastries, such as the tortell and king cake, are baked on Twelfth Night, and eaten the following day for the Feast of the Epiphany celebrations.
In many Western Christian Churches, the eve of the feast is celebrated as Twelfth Night.

Candlemas

Candlemas DayFiesta de La CandelariaPatron Saint‘s Day
A belief has arisen in modern times, in some English-speaking countries, that it is unlucky to leave Christmas decorations hanging after Twelfth Night, a tradition originally attached to the festival of Candlemas (2 February), which celebrates the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple.
While it is customary for Christians in some countries to remove their Christmas decorations on Twelfth Night (Epiphany Eve), those in other Christian countries historically remove them on Candlemas.

Christmas

Christmas DayDecember 25Nativity
In most Western ecclesiastical traditions, Christmas Day is considered the "First Day of Christmas" and the Twelve Days are, inclusive, making Twelfth Night on 5 January.
A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night; in some traditions, Christmastide includes an octave.

Christmas decoration

decoratingdecorationdecorations
A belief has arisen in modern times, in some English-speaking countries, that it is unlucky to leave Christmas decorations hanging after Twelfth Night, a tradition originally attached to the festival of Candlemas (2 February), which celebrates the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple.
In the Western Christian world, the two traditional days when Christmas decorations are removed are Twelfth Night and if they are not taken down on that day, Candlemas, the latter of which ends the Christmas-Epiphany season in some denominations.

Christmastide

Christmas seasonChristmasChristmas Time
Bruce Forbes writes: In 567 the Council of Tours proclaimed that the entire period between Christmas and Epiphany should be considered part of the celebration, creating what became known as the twelve days of Christmas, or what the English called Christmastide.
There are several celebrations within Christmastide, including Christmas Day (25 December), St. Stephen's Day (26 December), Childermas (28 December), New Year's Eve (31 December), the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God (New Year's Day) (1 January), the Feast of the Holy Family, as well as Epiphany Eve or Twelfth Night (the evening of 5 January).

King cake

galette des Roisthree kings cakekingcake
A popular Twelfth Night tradition was to have a bean and pea hidden inside a Twelfth-night cake; the "man who finds the bean in his slice of cake becomes King for the night while the lady who finds a pea in her slice of cake becomes Queen for the night." Around the world, special pastries, such as the tortell and king cake, are baked on Twelfth Night, and eaten the following day for the Feast of the Epiphany celebrations.
The season for king cake extends from the end of the Twelve Days of Christmas (Twelfth Night and Epiphany Day), up until the end of Shrovetide: Mardi Gras, "Fat Tuesday," or Shrove Tuesday; the day before the start of Lent.

Bean-feast

BeanoFeast
Around the world, special pastries, such as the tortell and king cake, are baked on Twelfth Night, and eaten the following day for the Feast of the Epiphany celebrations.
A bean-feast was an informal term for a celebratory meal or party, especially an annual summer dinner given by an employer to his or her employees, probably derived from a tradition in the Low Countries at Twelfth Night.

Christmas tree

Christmas Treestreedecorated tree
The same held true in the 19th–20th centuries with fruits adorning Christmas trees.
In the Western Christian tradition, Christmas trees are variously erected on days such as the first day of Advent or even as late as Christmas Eve depending on the country; customs of the same faith hold that the two traditional days when Christmas decorations, such as the Christmas tree, are removed are Twelfth Night and, if they are not taken down on that day, Candlemas, the latter of which ends the Christmas-Epiphany season in some denominations.

Wassailing

wassailerscarol singingWassail
The punch called wassail is consumed especially on Twelfth Night, but throughout Christmas time, especially in the UK, and door-to-door wassailing (similar to singing Christmas carols) was common up until the 1950s.
Traditionally, the wassail is celebrated on Twelfth Night (variously on either January 5 or 6). Some people still wassail on "Old Twelvey Night", January 17, as it would have been before the introduction of the Gregorian Calendar in 1752.

Twelve Days of Christmas

twelve days12 Days of ChristmasChristmas season
Twelfth Night is a festival in some branches of Christianity that takes place on the last night of the Twelve Days of Christmas, marking the coming of the Epiphany.
Twelfth Night is the last day for decorations to be taken down, and it is held to be bad luck to leave decorations up after this.

Wassail

Gloucestershire WassailLamb's woolwassail bowl
The punch called wassail is consumed especially on Twelfth Night, but throughout Christmas time, especially in the UK, and door-to-door wassailing (similar to singing Christmas carols) was common up until the 1950s.
At Carhampton, near Minehead, the Apple Orchard Wassailing is held on Old Twelfth Night (17 January) as a ritual to ask the Gods for a good apple harvest.

Mardi Gras

Fat TuesdayCarnivalLardy Thursday
In some countries, the Twelfth Night and Epiphany mark the start of the Carnival season, which lasts through Mardi Gras Day.
The festival season varies from city to city, as some traditions, such as the one in New Orleans, Louisiana, consider Mardi Gras to stretch the entire period from Twelfth Night (the last night of Christmas which begins Epiphany) to Ash Wednesday.

Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night, or What You Willthe playWas ihr wollt
Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night, or What You Will was written to be performed as a Twelfth Night entertainment.
Twelfth Night, or What You Will is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written around 1601–1602 as a Twelfth Night's entertainment for the close of the Christmas season.

The Masque of Blackness

Masque of BlacknessBlacknessMasque of Blacknesse
Ben Jonson's The Masque of Blackness was performed on 6 January 1605 at the Banqueting House in Whitehall.
The Masque of Blackness was an early Jacobean era masque, first performed at the Stuart Court in the Banqueting Hall of Whitehall Palace on Twelfth Night, 6 January 1605.

Apple Wassail

Apple Tree Wassailapple wassailing
This continues the custom of the Apple Wassail on the date that corresponded to 6 January on the Julian calendar at the time of the change in calendars enacted by the Calendar Act of 1750.
On Twelfth Night, men would go with their wassail bowl into the orchard and go about the trees.

Little Christmas

Old ChristmasChristmas on January 6Nollaig na mBan
In Ireland, it is still the tradition to place the statues of the Three Kings in the crib on Twelfth Night or, at the latest, the following Day, Little Christmas.
In the Western Christian world, the two traditional days when Christmas decorations are removed are Twelfth Night (the night before the Feast of the Epiphany) and if they are not taken down on that day, Candlemas, the latter of which ends the Christmas-Epiphany season in some denominations.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Twelfth Night is a festival in some branches of Christianity that takes place on the last night of the Twelve Days of Christmas, marking the coming of the Epiphany.

Presentation of Jesus at the Temple

PurificationCandlemasPresentation in the Temple
A belief has arisen in modern times, in some English-speaking countries, that it is unlucky to leave Christmas decorations hanging after Twelfth Night, a tradition originally attached to the festival of Candlemas (2 February), which celebrates the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple.

Chalking the door

blessing homes on Epiphanychalk on house doors
Other popular Twelfth Night customs include singing Christmas carols, chalking the door, having one's house blessed, merrymaking, as well as attending church services.

House blessing

having one's house blessedhomes were blessed
Other popular Twelfth Night customs include singing Christmas carols, chalking the door, having one's house blessed, merrymaking, as well as attending church services.

Church service

worship servicechurchservices
Other popular Twelfth Night customs include singing Christmas carols, chalking the door, having one's house blessed, merrymaking, as well as attending church services.

Christmas Eve

December 2424 DecemberEve of Nativity
In these traditions, Twelfth Night is the same as Epiphany and is also known as the "Thirteenth Day" However, some churches that fall in the latter category consider Twelfth Night to be the eve of the Twelfth Day (in the same way that Christmas Eve comes before Christmas), and thus consider Twelfth Night to be on 5 January.

Bruce Forbes

Bruce Forbes writes: In 567 the Council of Tours proclaimed that the entire period between Christmas and Epiphany should be considered part of the celebration, creating what became known as the twelve days of Christmas, or what the English called Christmastide.

Council of Tours

Council of Tours in 567Third Council of ToursTours
Bruce Forbes writes: In 567 the Council of Tours proclaimed that the entire period between Christmas and Epiphany should be considered part of the celebration, creating what became known as the twelve days of Christmas, or what the English called Christmastide.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
The Church of England, Mother Church of the Anglican Communion, celebrates Twelfth Night on the 5th and "refers to the night before Epiphany, the day when the nativity story tells us that the wise men visited the infant Jesus".