Twelve-step program

Twelve Steps12-step12-step programtwelve-step12-step programssponsorTwelve-step programstwelve step program12 steprecovery
A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems.wikipedia
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Alcoholics Anonymous

AAAA meetingA.A.
Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism, the Twelve Steps were first published in the 1939 book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The method was adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs.
The AA program of recovery is set forth in the Twelve Steps.

Higher Power

power greater than himself
Their varied success rate and the belief in a Higher Power suggested in them, are common criticisms of their universal applicability and efficacy.
Higher Power is a term used in the 1930s in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and is used in other twelve-step programs.

The Big Book (Alcoholics Anonymous)

Big BookThe Big BookAlcoholics Anonymous
Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism, the Twelve Steps were first published in the 1939 book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The method was adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs.
It is the originator of the seminal "twelve-step method" widely used to treat many addictions, from alcoholism, heroin addiction and marijuana addiction to overeating, sex addiction and gambling addiction, with a strong spiritual and social emphasis.

Self-help

self-improvementself helpself-development
Over 200 self-help organizations—often known as fellowships—with a worldwide membership of millions—now employ twelve-step principles for recovery.
Concepts and terms originating in self-help culture and Twelve-Step culture, such as recovery, dysfunctional families, and codependency have become firmly integrated in mainstream language.

List of twelve-step groups

fellowshipsTwelve Step groupstwelve-step programs
Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism, the Twelve Steps were first published in the 1939 book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The method was adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs. Over 200 self-help organizations—often known as fellowships—with a worldwide membership of millions—now employ twelve-step principles for recovery.
This is a list of notable twelve-step groups, groups which are based on the set of guiding principles for recovery from addictive, compulsive, or other behavioral problems originally developed by Alcoholics Anonymous.

Narcotics Anonymous

NAChristiansheroin addiction
Narcotics Anonymous was formed by addicts who did not relate to the specifics of alcohol dependency.
Narcotics Anonymous uses a traditional 12-step model that has been expanded and developed for people with varied substance abuse issues and is the second-largest 12-step organization.

Recovery approach

recoveryRecovery modelAddiction recovery
Over 200 self-help organizations—often known as fellowships—with a worldwide membership of millions—now employ twelve-step principles for recovery.
The broader concept of "recovery" as a general philosophy and model was first popularized in regard to recovery from substance abuse/drug addiction, for example within twelve-step programs.

Marijuana Anonymous

marijuana addiction
Demographic preferences related to the addicts' drug of choice has led to the creation of Cocaine Anonymous, Crystal Meth Anonymous and Marijuana Anonymous.
Marijuana Anonymous (MA) is an organization and twelve-step program for people with common desire to maintain abstinence from marijuana.

Cocaine Anonymous

Co-Anon
Demographic preferences related to the addicts' drug of choice has led to the creation of Cocaine Anonymous, Crystal Meth Anonymous and Marijuana Anonymous.
Cocaine Anonymous (CA) is a twelve-step program for people who seek recovery from drug addiction.

Crystal Meth Anonymous

Demographic preferences related to the addicts' drug of choice has led to the creation of Cocaine Anonymous, Crystal Meth Anonymous and Marijuana Anonymous.
Crystal Meth Anonymous (CMA) is a California-based non-profit, public-benefit corporation working as a twelve-step program of recovered and recovering crystal meth addicts.

Overeaters Anonymous

Anorexia AnonymousEaters Anonymousfood
Behavioral issues such as compulsion for, and/or addiction to, gambling, crime, food, sex, hoarding, getting into debt and work are addressed in fellowships such as Gamblers Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Sexaholics Anonymous and Debtors Anonymous.
Overeaters Anonymous (OA) is a twelve-step program for people with problems related to food including, but not limited to, compulsive overeaters, those with binge eating disorder, bulimics and anorexics.

Gamblers Anonymous

Gam-AnonGAGam-A-Teen
Behavioral issues such as compulsion for, and/or addiction to, gambling, crime, food, sex, hoarding, getting into debt and work are addressed in fellowships such as Gamblers Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Sexaholics Anonymous and Debtors Anonymous.
Gamblers Anonymous (GA) is a twelve-step program for people who have a gambling problem.

Debtors Anonymous

Behavioral issues such as compulsion for, and/or addiction to, gambling, crime, food, sex, hoarding, getting into debt and work are addressed in fellowships such as Gamblers Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Sexaholics Anonymous and Debtors Anonymous.
Debtors Anonymous (DA) is a twelve-step program for people who want to stop incurring unsecured debt.

Sexaholics Anonymous

S-Anonsex addictionsexaholic
Behavioral issues such as compulsion for, and/or addiction to, gambling, crime, food, sex, hoarding, getting into debt and work are addressed in fellowships such as Gamblers Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Sexaholics Anonymous and Debtors Anonymous.
Sexaholics Anonymous (SA) is one of several twelve-step programs for compulsive sexual behavior based on the original twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Nar-Anon

to narcotics
Auxiliary groups such as Al-Anon and Nar-Anon, for friends and family members of alcoholics and addicts, respectively, are part of a response to treating addiction as a disease that is enabled by family systems.
Nar-Anon, known officially as "Nar-Anon Family Groups", is a twelve-step program for friends and family members of those who are affected by someone else's addiction.

Substance dependence

addictiondependencedrug dependence
Twelve-step methods have been adapted to address a wide range of alcoholism, substance-abuse and dependency problems.
One of many recovery methods are 12-step recovery programs, with prominent examples including Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Drug Addicts Anonymous and Pills Anonymous.

Co-Dependents Anonymous

Co-Dependent's AnonymousCoDACodependents Anonymous
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) addresses compulsions related to relationships, referred to as codependency.
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) is a twelve-step program for people who share a common desire to develop functional and healthy relationships.

Compulsive behavior

compulsivecompulsioncompulsions
A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems.
Compulsive gambling can be helped with various forms of treatment such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Self-help or Twelve-step programs, and potentially medication.

Bill W.

Bill WilsonBill WWilliam Griffith Wilson
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), the first twelve-step fellowship, was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith, known to AA members as "Bill W."
The book was given the title Alcoholics Anonymous and included the list of suggested activities for spiritual growth known as the Twelve Steps.

Twelve Traditions

AA's Twelfth TraditionSingleness of PurposeThe Traditions
The Twelve Traditions encourage members to practice the spiritual principle of anonymity in the public media and members are also asked to respect each other's confidentiality.
The Twelve Traditions of twelve-step programs provide guidelines for relationships between the twelve-step groups, members, other groups, the global fellowship, and society at large.

Al-Anon/Alateen

Al-AnonAl-Anon Family GroupsAlateen
Auxiliary groups such as Al-Anon and Nar-Anon, for friends and family members of alcoholics and addicts, respectively, are part of a response to treating addiction as a disease that is enabled by family systems.
Al-Anon adopted the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous for their use "word for word with the exception of the Twelfth Step", changing the word "alcoholics" to "others" ("we tried to carry this message to others").

Adult Children of Alcoholics

Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACA or ACOA) addresses the effects of growing up in an alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional family.
This program is known as the 12 steps.

Addiction

drug addictiondrug addictdrug addicts
A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems.
According to a review, "in order to be effective, all pharmacological or biologically based treatments for addiction need to be integrated into other established forms of addiction rehabilitation, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, individual and group psychotherapy, behavior-modification strategies, twelve-step programs, and residential treatment facilities."

Codependency

codependentco-dependentcodependence
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) addresses compulsions related to relationships, referred to as codependency.
There also exist support groups for codependency, such as Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Al-Anon/Alateen, Nar-Anon, and Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACoA), which are based on the twelve-step program model of Alcoholics Anonymous and Celebrate Recovery, a Christian, Bible-based group.

Drug rehabilitation

rehabrehabilitationdrug rehab
Twelve-step programs encourage addicts not only to stop using alcohol or other drugs, but to examine and change habits related to their addictions.