Ty Cobb

Cobb[Ty] CobbMr. Teaceythe Hall of Fame baseball player bearing the same namethe legendary professional baseball playerTyrus "Ty" CobbTyrus Cobb
Tyrus Raymond Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder.wikipedia
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Detroit Tigers

TigersDetroitDET
Cobb spent 22 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, the last six as the team's player-manager, and finished his career with the Philadelphia Athletics.
In 1905, the team acquired 18-year-old Ty Cobb, a fearless player with a mean streak, who came to be regarded as one of the greatest players of all time.

List of Major League Baseball career hits leaders

all-time hits listall-time list2,000 hit mark
He retained many other records for almost a half century or more, including most career hits until 1985 (4,189 or 4,191, depending on source), most career runs (2,245 or 2,246 depending on source) until 2001, most career games played (3,035) and at bats (11,429 or 11,434 depending on source) until 1974, and the modern record for most career stolen bases (892) until 1977.
Rose and Ty Cobb second most, are the only players with 4,000 or more career hits.

1936 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

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In 1936 Cobb received the most votes of any player on the inaugural Baseball Hall of Fame ballot, receiving 222 out of a possible 226 votes (98.2%); no other player received a higher percentage of votes until Tom Seaver in 1992.

List of Major League Baseball career batting average leaders

career batting average.333 career batting averageall-time list for career batting average
He still holds several records as of the end of the 2019 season, including the highest career batting average (.366 or .367, depending on source) and most career batting titles with 11 (or 12, depending on source).
Outfielder Ty Cobb, whose career ended in 1928, has the highest batting average in Major League Baseball (MLB) history.

List of Major League Baseball batting champions

batting titlebatting championAL batting champion
He still holds several records as of the end of the 2019 season, including the highest career batting average (.366 or .367, depending on source) and most career batting titles with 11 (or 12, depending on source). At age 20, he was the youngest player to win a batting championship and held this record until 1955, when fellow Detroit Tiger Al Kaline won the batting title twelve days younger than Cobb when he did it.
Ty Cobb of the Detroit Tigers, who also holds the highest career batting average of .366, led the AL in average in 11 (or 12) seasons.

Al Stump

Cobb's reputation as a violent man was fanned by his first biographer, sportswriter Al Stump, whose stories about Cobb have been discredited as sensationalized, and have largely proven to be fictional.
Stump spent time with Detroit Tigers' Hall of Fame baseball player Ty Cobb in 1960 and 1961 collaborating on Cobb's autobiography.

Outfielder

OFoutfieldcorner outfielder
Tyrus Raymond Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder.
Outfielders named to the MLB All-Century Team are Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Stan Musial, Pete Rose, Babe Ruth, Ted Williams and Ken Griffey Jr.

Nap Lajoie

Napoleon LajoieLajoieNapoleon "Nap" Lajoie
Going into the final days of the 1910 season, Cobb had a .004 lead on Nap Lajoie for the American League batting title.
During several of those years with the Naps he and Ty Cobb dominated AL hitting categories and traded batting titles with each other, most notably coming in 1910, when the league's batting champion was not decided until well after the last game of the season and after an investigation by American League President Ban Johnson.

Inside-the-park home run

inside-the-parkinside the parkinside-the-park grand slam
Although he performed poorly in the postseason, he won the Triple Crown by hitting .377 with 107 RBI and nine home runs, all inside the park, thus becoming the only player of the modern era to lead his league in home runs in a season without hitting a ball over the fence.

List of American League pennant winners

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After being moved to right field, he led the Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants in 1907, 1908 & 1909.

Al Kaline

At age 20, he was the youngest player to win a batting championship and held this record until 1955, when fellow Detroit Tiger Al Kaline won the batting title twelve days younger than Cobb when he did it.
No 20-year-old major league player had won a batting title since Ty Cobb in 1907.

Rogers Hornsby

Roger Hornsbybaseball Hall of FamerHornsby
Cobb felt that it was these mind games that caused Jackson to "fall off" to a final average of .408, twelve points lower than Cobb's .420, a twentieth-century record which stood until George Sisler tied it and Rogers Hornsby surpassed it with .424, the record since then except for Hugh Duffy's .438 in the nineteenth century.
He had 2,930 hits and 301 home runs in his career; his career batting average of .358 is second only to Ty Cobb, at .367, in MLB history.

Center fielder

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Three weeks after his mother killed his father, Cobb debuted in center field for the Detroit Tigers.

Hitting streak

hit streakhitting-streak56-game consecutive-game hitting streak
Cobb was having a tremendous year in 1911, which included a 40-game hitting streak.

Sam Crawford

CrawfordWahoo Sam" Crawford
At the end of the sixth inning, after being challenged by teammates Sam Crawford and Jim Delahanty to do something about it, Cobb climbed into the stands and attacked Lucker, who it turned out was handicapped (he had lost all of one hand and three fingers on his other hand in an industrial accident).
While with the Tigers, Crawford played alongside superstar Ty Cobb, and the two had an intense rivalry while also helping Detroit win three American League championships from 1907 to 1909.

Major League Baseball

MLBMajor LeagueMajor Leagues
Tyrus Raymond Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder.
In 1985, Pete Rose broke Ty Cobb's all-time hits record with his 4,192nd hit, and in 1989 Rose received a lifetime ban from baseball as a result of betting on baseball games while manager of the Cincinnati Reds.

Narrows, Georgia

Narrows
He was born in rural Narrows, Georgia.
Narrows was the birthplace of Ty Cobb.

Branch Rickey

Rickey, Branch
It was performances like this that led Branch Rickey to say later that Cobb "had brains in his feet".
Rickey served as an officer in the U.S. Army in France during World War I. He commanded a chemical training unit that included Ty Cobb and Christy Mathewson.

Allan Travers

Al TraversDetroit Tigers baseball team walked out on strike
For that one game, Detroit fielded a replacement team made up of hastily recruited college and sandlot players plus two Tiger coaches and lost 24–2, thereby setting some of Major League Baseball's modern-era (post-1900) negative records, notably the 26 hits in a nine-inning game allowed by Allan Travers, who pitched one of the sport's most unlikely complete games.
Travers was only playing because the Detroit Tigers team had refused to play after their teammate Ty Cobb had been suspended for attacking a heckler who called him a "half-nigger" during a game against the New York Yankees at Hilltop Park three days earlier.

Fred Clarke

Other notable baseball stars who assaulted heckling fans include Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Rube Waddell, Kid Gleason, Sherry Magee, and Fred Clarke.
He and fellow Hall of Famers Honus Wagner and Vic Willis led Pittsburgh to a victory over Ty Cobb and the Detroit Tigers in the 1909 World Series.

Maury Wills

In 1915, Cobb set the single-season record for stolen bases with 96, which stood until Dodger Maury Wills broke it in 1962.
Wills was the National League Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1962, stealing a record 104 bases to break the old modern era mark of 96, set by Ty Cobb in 1915.

Charlie Gehringer

Charles GehringerCharley GehringerCharlie (Mechanical Man) Gehringer
Cobb regarded baseball as "something like a war", future Tiger second baseman Charlie Gehringer said.
(Anthony Connor, "Voices from Cooperstown" (1982), p. 37) Player-manager Ty Cobb was reportedly so impressed with Gehringer that he asked club owner Frank Navin to sign Gehringer to a contract on the spot.

George Sisler

George(George) SislerGeorge Harold Sisler
Cobb felt that it was these mind games that caused Jackson to "fall off" to a final average of .408, twelve points lower than Cobb's .420, a twentieth-century record which stood until George Sisler tied it and Rogers Hornsby surpassed it with .424, the record since then except for Hugh Duffy's .438 in the nineteenth century.
Sisler led the team in most offensive categories and his .353 batting average was second in the American League, behind Ty Cobb.

Hughie Jennings

Hugh JenningsHughie "Ee-Yah" JenningsJennings
Tigers manager Hughie Jennings later acknowledged that Cobb was targeted for abuse by veteran players, some of whom sought to force him off the team.
In, Jennings was hired as manager of a talented Detroit Tigers team that included future Hall of Famers Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford.

Player-coach

player-managerplayer/managerplayer manager
Cobb spent 22 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, the last six as the team's player-manager, and finished his career with the Philadelphia Athletics.
Cap Anson, Connie Mack, John McGraw, Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, Joe Cronin, Mickey Cochrane, Solly Hemus, Lou Boudreau, Joe Torre, and Frank Robinson are among those who spent time as player-managers.