UNESCO

Flag of UNESCO
UNESCO offices in Brasília
UNESCO Institute for Water Education in Delft
The Garden of Peace at UNESCO headquarters
Carondelet Palace, Presidential Palace – with changing of the guards. The Historic Center of Quito, Ecuador, is one of the largest, least-altered and best-preserved historic centres in the Americas. This centre was, together with the historic centre of Kraków in Poland, the first to be declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO on 18 September 1978.

Specialised agency of the United Nations (UN) aimed at promoting world peace and security through international cooperation in education, arts, sciences and culture.

- UNESCO

179 related topics

Alpha

United Nations

Intergovernmental organization whose purpose is to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international cooperation, and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.

Intergovernmental organization whose purpose is to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international cooperation, and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.

Members of the United Nations
1943 sketch by Franklin Roosevelt of the UN original three branches: The Four Policemen, an executive branch, and an international assembly of forty UN member states
The UN in 1945: founding members in light blue, protectorates and territories of the founding members in dark blue
Dag Hammarskjöld was a particularly active secretary-general from 1953 until his death in 1961.
Kofi Annan, secretary-general from 1997 to 2006
Flags of member nations at the United Nations Headquarters, seen in 2007
Mikhail Gorbachev, Soviet general secretary, addressing the UN General Assembly in December 1988
Colin Powell, the US Secretary of State, demonstrates a vial with alleged Iraq chemical weapon probes to the UN Security Council on Iraq war hearings, 5 February 2003
Current secretary-general, António Guterres
The ICJ ruled that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 did not violate international law.
Under Sukarno, Indonesia became the first and only country to leave the United Nations.
A Nepalese soldier on a peacekeeping deployment providing security at a rice distribution site in Haiti during 2010
The UN Buffer Zone in Cyprus was established in 1974 following the Turkish invasion of Cyprus.
Eleanor Roosevelt with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1949
Three former directors of the Global Smallpox Eradication Programme reading the news that smallpox has been globally eradicated in 1980
In Jordan, UNHCR remains responsible for the Syrian refugees and the Zaatari refugee camp.
The 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to the UN—diploma in the lobby of the UN Headquarters in New York City
Marking of the UN's 70th anniversary – Budapest, 2015

The UN System includes a multitude of specialized agencies, funds and programmes such as the World Bank Group, the World Health Organization, the World Food Programme, UNESCO, and UNICEF.

The World Heritage emblem is used to identify properties protected by the World Heritage Convention and inscribed on the official World Heritage List.

World Heritage Site

The World Heritage emblem is used to identify properties protected by the World Heritage Convention and inscribed on the official World Heritage List.
Site No. 252: Taj Mahal, an example of a cultural heritage site
Site No. 156: Serengeti National Park, an example of a natural heritage site
Site No. 274: Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu, an example of a mixed heritage site
Site No. 1, the Galápagos Islands, had its boundaries extended in 2001 and 2003, and was included on the danger list from 2007 to 2010
UNESCO World Heritage Sites

A World Heritage Site is a landmark or area with legal protection by an international convention administered by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Bolivia

Country located in western-central South America.

Country located in western-central South America.

Puerta del Sol, Archaeological Zone of Tiwanaku, Bolivia
Fuerte Chané de Samaipata
Tiwanaku at its largest territorial extent, AD 950 (present-day boundaries shown).
Inca Expansion (1438–1533)
Casa de La Moneda, Potosí
Casa de La Libertad, Sucre
Banco Central de Bolivia, Sucre
The first coat of arms of Bolivia, formerly named the Republic of Bolívar in honor of Simón Bolívar
Bolivia's territorial losses (1867–1938)
In 1971 Hugo Banzer Suárez, supported by the CIA, forcibly ousted President Torres in a coup.
Former President, Evo Morales
2020 Bolivian general election, results by department
Inauguration of Luis Arce and David Choquehuanca on 8 November 2020
Mururata as seen from the tropical valleys of the Yungas
Laguna Colorada in the Puna de Lipez in Potosí
Topographical map of Bolivia
Satellite image of Bolivia
Bolivian Altiplano.
Sol de Mañana (Morning Sun in Spanish), a geothermal field in Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve, Potosi Department, southwestern Bolivia. The area, characterized by intense volcanic activity, with sulfur spring fields and mud lakes, has indeed no geysers but rather holes that emit pressurized steam up to 50 meters high.
Bolivia map of Köppen climate classification.
Amazon river basin seen in Pando Department, Northern Bolivia
Mean annual precipitation in Bolivia
Chacaltaya Ski Resort, La Paz Department
New Executive Building of the Bolivian Government
Building of the Plurinational Legislative Assembly in central La Paz
The Supreme Court Building in the capital of Bolivia, Sucre
Government buildings in Bolivia's executive and legislative capital La Paz
Government buildings in Bolivia's judicial capital Sucre
Presidents of Bolivia, Cuba and El Salvador greet Nicolás Maduro at Maduro's second inauguration in Caracas on 10 January 2019
Serranía de Los Volcanes in Cuevas, Florida Province
View of the Capital of La Paz, or Chuqiyapumarka, from the Zona Sur
Province of Nor Yungas, near Coroico
El Palmar Nature Preserve, in northern Chuquisaca
The three FCAB units GL26C-2 2005, 2010 and GT22CU-3 2402 climb the Ascotan pass. The train is hauling lead ore from the San Cristobal mine in Bolivia to Antofagasta, Chile
Historical GDP per capita development
A proportional representation of Bolivia exports, 2019
YPFB Headquarters in El Prado, Nuestra Señora de La Paz
Boliviana de Aviación (BoA) is a state-owned company and the country's largest airline. Two BoA Boeing 737-300s parked at Jorge Wilstermann International Airport.
People in La Paz city center
Danza de los macheteros, typical dance from San Ignacio de Moxos, Bolivia
Aymara man, near Lake Titicaca, Bolivia
Church of San Lorenzo de Carangas, Potosí, mid-16th century–1744.
Bolivian children playing tarka
The Diablada, dance primeval, typical and main of Carnival of Oruro a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity since 2001 in Bolivia (File: Fraternidad Artística y Cultural "La Diablada")
Leopardus pardalis
Saimiri boliviensis
Ñandú
Lama glama
Inia boliviensis
Swietenia macrophylla
Chenopodium quinoa
Echinopsis boyuibensis
Ceiba speciosa
Handroanthus impetiginosus
Cóndor
Tucán
Phoenicopterus andinus

In 2008, following UNESCO standards, Bolivia was declared free of illiteracy, making it the fourth country in South America to attain this status.

Brazil

Largest country in both South America and Latin America.

Largest country in both South America and Latin America.

Depiction of Pedro Álvares Cabral landing in Porto Seguro in 1500, ushering in more than 300 years of Portuguese rule of Colonial Brazil.
Painting showing the arrest of Tiradentes; he was sentenced to death for his involvement in the best known movement for independence in Colonial Brazil. Painting of 1914.
The Acclamation of King João VI of the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves in Rio de Janeiro, 6 February 1818
Declaration of the Brazilian independence by Prince Pedro (later Emperor Pedro I) on 7 September 1822.
Pedro II, Emperor of Brazil between 1831 and 1889.
Soldiers of the FEB, the only Latin American military force in World War II, in Massarosa, Italy, 1944.
Ulysses Guimarães holding the Constitution of 1988 in his hands
Coin of 1 real commemorating 25 years of Real Plan, which brought stability to the Brazilian economy after years of hyperinflation.
Topographic map of Brazil
Rock formations and the Dedo de Deus (God's Finger) peak in the background, Serra dos Órgãos National Park, Rio de Janeiro state
Brazil map of Köppen climate classification zones
Female pantanal jaguar in Piquirí River, Mato Grosso. Pantanal is the world's largest tropical wetland area.
The Amazon rainforest, the most biodiverse rainforest in the world
Palácio do Planalto, the official workplace of the President of Brazil.
National Congress, seat of the legislative branch.
Supreme Federal Court of Brazil serves primarily as the Constitutional Court of the country
Itamaraty Palace, the seat of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Field agents of the Federal Police's Tactical Operations Command.
A proportional representation of Brazil exports, 2019
SUS official symbol, the Brazilian publicly funded health care system
Historical building of the Federal University of Paraná, one of the oldest universities in Brazil, located in Curitiba.
Former President Dilma Rousseff at Jornal Nacional news program. Rede Globo is the world's second-largest commercial television network.
Population density of Brazilian municipalities
Immigration Museum of the State of São Paulo in the neighborhood of Mooca, in São Paulo city. The Italian Brazilians are 15% of the population and the largest Italian community outside Italy.
The Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro is one of the most famous religious statues worldwide
Museum of the Portuguese Language in São Paulo city, São Paulo.
Ocas of the Kuikuro people, Xingu Indigenous Park, Mato Grosso
Pomerode, Santa Catarina, is one of the municipalities with a cooficial language. In this region, Hunsrückisch and East Pomeranian, German dialects, are two of the minor languages (see Brazilian German).
Parade of Portela samba school at the Rio Carnival, the largest carnival in the world
Tom Jobim, one of the creators of bossa nova, and Chico Buarque, one of the leading names of MPB.
Machado de Assis, poet and novelist, founder of the Brazilian Academy of Letters.
Festival de Gramado, the biggest film festival in the country
São Paulo Municipal Theater, significant both for its architectural value as well as for its historical importance.
Candido Portinari in 1962, one of the most important Brazilian painters
Players at the podium with the first Olympic Gold of the Brazil national football team, won in the 2016 Summer Olympics. Football is the most popular sport in the country.
Brazil's tropical primary (old-growth) forest loss greatly exceeds that of other countries (compare rectangular areas), though its percentage loss is about the median among the ten countries with the greatest loss.
Palácio do Planalto, the official workplace of the President of Brazil.
The Cathedral of Brasilia, designed by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer for the federal capital, an example of Modern architecture
Feijoada is one of the main dishes of Brazilian cuisine
Augusto Boal presenting a workshop on the Theatre of the Oppressed at Riverside Church in New York City in 2008

Due to its rich culture and history, the country ranks thirteenth in the world by number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Adult literacy rates, 2015 or most recent observation

Literacy

Literacy in its broadest sense describes "particular ways of thinking about and doing reading and writing" with the purpose of understanding or expressing thoughts or ideas in written form in some specific context of use.

Literacy in its broadest sense describes "particular ways of thinking about and doing reading and writing" with the purpose of understanding or expressing thoughts or ideas in written form in some specific context of use.

Adult literacy rates, 2015 or most recent observation
World illiteracy has halved between 1970 and 2015
Literate and illiterate world population between 1800 and 2016
Illiteracy rate in France in the 18th and 19th centuries
Bill of sale of a male slave and a building in Shuruppak, Sumerian tablet, circa 2600 BC
Adult literacy rates have increased at a constant pace since 1950.
Literacy has rapidly spread in several regions over the last twenty-five years.
Adult literacy rate, male (%), 2015
Adult literacy rate, female (%), 2015
Gender parity indices in youth literacy rates by region, 1990–2015. Progress towards gender parity in literacy started after 1990.
Youth and adult literacy rate, 2000–2016 and projections to 2030
Students in grade 2 who can't read a single word
Brain areas involved in literacy acquisition
Sample milestone sketch
Reviewing photos after photowalk
Integrating Common Core content into language training with MELL
Including orality
Sample covers of completed authorship created books
Most illiterate persons now live in Southern Asia or sub-Saharan Africa.
Dutch schoolmaster and children, 1662
One-room school in Alabama c. 1935
Native youth in front of Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania c. 1900
Young school girls in Paktia Province of Afghanistan
Three Laotian girls sit outside their school, each absorbed in reading a book they received at a rural school book party.
The University of Peradeniya's Sarachchandra open-air theatre, named in memory of Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Sri Lanka's premier playwright.

In 2018, UNESCO includes "printed and written materials" and "varying contexts" in its definition of literacy; e.g. "the ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate and compute, using printed and written materials associated with varying contexts".

League of Nations

The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

Anachronous world map showing member states of the League during its 26-year history.
The 1864 Geneva Convention, one of the earliest formulations of international law
The League to Enforce Peace published this full-page promotion in The New York Times on Christmas Day 1918. It resolved that the League "should ensure peace by eliminating causes of dissension, by deciding controversies by peaceable means, and by uniting the potential force of all the members as a standing menace against any nation that seeks to upset the peace of the world".
On his December 1918 trip to Europe, Woodrow Wilson gave speeches that "reaffirmed that the making of peace and the creation of a League of Nations must be accomplished as one single objective".
In 1924, the headquarters of the League was named "Palais Wilson", after Woodrow Wilson, who was credited as the "Founder of the League of Nations"
League of Nations Organisation chart
Palace of Nations, Geneva, the League's headquarters from 1936 until its dissolution in 1946
Child labour in a coal mine, United States, c. 1912
Child labour in Kamerun in 1919
A sample Nansen passport
A map of the world in 1920–45, which shows the League of Nations members during its history
Chinese delegate addresses the League of Nations concerning the Manchurian Crisis in 1932.
Emperor Haile Selassie I going into exile in Bath, England via Jerusalem
The Gap in the Bridge; the sign reads "This League of Nations Bridge was designed by the President of the U.S.A."
Cartoon from Punch magazine, 10 December 1920, satirising the gap left by the US not joining the League.
World map showing member states of the League of Nations (in green and red) on 18 April 1946, when the League of Nations ceased to exist.
League of Nations archives, Geneva.

These included the Disarmament Commission, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the Mandates Commission, the International Commission on Intellectual Cooperation (precursor to UNESCO), the Permanent Central Opium Board, the Commission for Refugees, and the Slavery Commission.

Mexico City

Capital and largest city of Mexico, and the most populous city in North America.

Capital and largest city of Mexico, and the most populous city in North America.

The city was the place of Mexico-Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital.
Storming of the Teocalli by Cortez and his Troops (1848)
Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral's (1571–1813) 18th century painting. The cathedral was built by the Spaniards over the ruins of the main Aztec temple.
Mexico City in 1628
Palacio de Mineria, Mexico City. The elevation of silver mining as a profession and the ennoblement of silver miners was a development of the eighteenth-century Bourbon Reforms
A painting of the American assault on the Chapultepec Castle.
Mexican President and later dictator Porfirio Díaz (second from right) commissioned many of the ornate European style buildings constructed from the 1890–1910 and hoped for Mexico City to eventually rival European cities like Paris in opulence
Corpses in front of the National Palace during the Ten Tragic Days. Photographer, Manuel Ramos.
Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera house in San Ángel designed by Juan O'Gorman, an example of 20th-century Modernist architecture in Mexico
Students in a burned bus during the protests of 1968
First ladies Paloma Cordero of Mexico (left) and Nancy Reagan of the United States (right) with U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, John Gavin observing the damage done by the 1985 earthquake.
Satellite image of Mexico City
Trajineras in the canals of Xochimilco. Xochimilco and the historic center of Mexico City were declared a World Heritage Site in 1987.
Air pollution over Mexico City. Air quality is poorest during the winter.
The Chapultepec was an important park during the Aztecs whose access had been limited to its nobility, was declared open to the public by a decree of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor in 1530, it is one of the world's largest city parks.
Lightning in the background of the Torre Mayor
Growth of Mexico city's area from 1900 to 2000
Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in La Villa de Guadalupe, the main Catholic pilgrimage site in the Americas. It houses the original image of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
Secretariat of Health building
Central Campus of the University City of the UNAM. Since 2007 the University City is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The National Palace of Mexico
Senate of the Republic
Legislative Palace of San Lázaro
Offices of the Secretariat of Foreign Affairs
Mexico City's Legislative Assembly building
The 16 boroughs of Mexico City
Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City
The Paseo de la Reforma is a wide avenue designed by Ferdinand von Rosenzweig in the 1860s and was modeled after the Champs-Élysées in Paris.
Palacio de Hierro store
The Turibus runs through many of the most important tourist attractions in the city.
The Art Nouveau/Neoclassical Palacio de Bellas Artes is the prominent cultural center in the city
Receptions Hall at the Museo Nacional de Arte
lReconstruction of the entrance to the Hochob temple in the National Museum of Anthropology
Museo Soumaya
The City Theatre built in 1918.
A guajolota, a tamale torta invention.
Televisa headquarters in Mexico City
Azteca Stadium, the 21st largest stadium in the world
Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez
Mexico City Arena
Mexico City Metro
Metrobús rapid transit bus stop station at Indios Verdes
The Anillo Periférico and Paseo de la Reforma in Miguel Hidalgo
Bicycles available for rental in Zona Rosa
Mexico City International Airport
Felipe Ángeles International Airport

The Historic center of Mexico City (Centro Histórico) and the "floating gardens" of Xochimilco in the southern borough have been declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO.

United Kingdom

Sovereign country in Europe, off the north-western coast of the continental mainland.

Sovereign country in Europe, off the north-western coast of the continental mainland.

Stonehenge in Wiltshire is a ring of stones, each about 13 ft high, 7 ft wide and 25 tonnes, erected 2400–2200 BC.
The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings, 1066, and the events leading to it.
The Treaty of Union led to a united kingdom of all of Great Britain.
At the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, a British-led coalition under the Duke of Wellington, supported by von Blücher's Prussian army, defeated the French, ending the Napoleonic Wars.
Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme. More than 885,000 British soldiers died on the battlefields of the First World War.
Territories once part of the British Empire, with the United Kingdom and its current Overseas Dependencies and Crown Dependencies underlined in red
Leaders of EU states in 2007. The UK entered the EEC in 1973. In a 1975 referendum 67% voted to stay in it; in 2016 52% voted to leave the EU.
The United Kingdom showing hilly regions to north and west
Köppen climate types of the UK
The Palace of Westminster, seat of both houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
Organisational chart of the UK political system
The Scottish Parliament Building in Holyrood is the seat of the Scottish Parliament.
The British-Irish Council comprises the UK Government, the Irish Government and the governments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The Royal Courts of Justice of England and Wales
The High Court of Justiciary, the supreme criminal court of Scotland
and, a pair of Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers of the Royal Navy
British soldier firing during an exercise.
The Bank of England, the central bank of the United Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based
The Mini Electric is manufactured in the UK.
Engines and wings for the Airbus A380 are manufactured in the UK.
A Watt steam engine, which was fundamental in driving the Industrial Revolution
London St Pancras International is one of London's main domestic and international transport hubs, providing commuter and high-speed rail services across the UK and to Paris, Lille and Brussels.
Energy mix of the United Kingdom over time
Wind turbines overlooking Ardrossan, Scotland. The UK is one of the best sites in Europe for wind energy, and wind power production is its fastest-growing supply.
Map of population density in the UK as at the 2011 census
Percentage of the population not white according to the 2011 census
Westminster Abbey
Estimated foreign-born population by country of birth from April 2007 to March 2008
Estimated number of British citizens living overseas by country in 2006
Christ Church, Oxford, is part of the University of Oxford, which traces its foundations back to c. 1096.
King's College (right) and Clare College (left), both part of the University of Cambridge, which was founded in 1209
The Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital, an NHS Scotland specialist children's hospital
The Chandos portrait, believed to depict William Shakespeare
A photograph of Victorian-era novelist Charles Dickens
Elgar aged about 60
The Beatles are the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed band in popular music, selling over a billion records.
J. M. W. Turner self-portrait, oil on canvas, c. 1799
Alfred Hitchcock has been ranked as one of the greatest and most influential British filmmakers of all time.
The Art Deco facade of Broadcasting House in London, headquarters of the BBC, the oldest and largest broadcaster in the world
Wembley Stadium, London, home of the England national football team, is the fifth most expensive stadium ever built.
The Millennium Stadium of Cardiff opened for the 1999 Rugby World Cup.
Wimbledon, the oldest Grand Slam tennis tournament, is held in Wimbledon, London every June and July.
St Andrews, Scotland, the home of golf. The standard 18 hole golf course was created at St Andrews in 1764.
The Statue of Britannia in Plymouth. Britannia is a national personification of the UK.

Glasgow's contribution to music was recognised in 2008 when it was named a UNESCO City of Music.

Lima

Capital and the largest city of Peru.

Capital and the largest city of Peru.

"The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Peru" created in 1590 by Guamán Poma and Martín de Murúa. (J. Paul Getty Museum).
The colonial Lima's coat of arms official since 7 December 1537.
Pachacámac, built 3,000 years ago, was one of the most important pre-Columbian centres of pilgrimage on the Peruvian Coast.
"The City of the Kings of Lima, royal high court, principal city of the kingdom of the Indies, residence of the viceroy, and archbishopric of the church", painting of 1615 by the Inca painter Guamán Poma. Royal Library, Denmark.
Renaissance Lima Metropolitan Cathedral, built between 1602 and 1797.
Baroque Basilica of San Francisco, built between 1657 and 1672.
José de San Martín during the Declaration of Independence of Peru in the Plaza Mayor de Lima, on July 28, 1821.
Lima as seen from the International Space Station
Lima at night from space
220x220px
Government Palace of Perú
Palace of Justice, Lima
Lima City Hall
People of Lima.
Market in the Plaza of the Inquisition (Lima) by Johann Moritz Rugendas, ca. 1843.
Pueblos jóvenes on the outskirts of Lima in 2015. Today, many of them are consolidated.
Financial center of San Isidro
The Lima Stock Exchange building.
The Catacombs of the Basilica of San Francisco was the Old cemetery of the city during all the colonial times, until 1810. It contain bones of some 70,000 colonial people.
Huaca Pucllana, pre-Columbian archaeological site located in the district of Miraflores.
The Rococo Casa de Osambela completed in 1805.
Balconies were a common colonial architectural feature in the historic center. In the image the Palacio de Torre Tagle completed in 1735.
Causa limeña
Rococo Basilica of Santo Domingo, built between 1678 and 1766. It holds the tombs of the saints Rose of Lima, Martín de Porres and John Macias.
Northern Lima 
 Southern Lima 
 Eastern Lima
Colonial Casona and Chapel of the National University of San Marcos, it is the second oldest university in the Americas.
Edificio Ministerio de Educación (Ministry of Education), San Borja.
Jorge Chávez International Airport
The Port of Callao.
Sistema Integrado de Transporte Bus System in Arequipa Avenue (Route 301)
El Metropolitano.
Lima Metro.
Traffic Jam in Javier Prado Avenue
San Isidro, Lima from above.
Francisco Pizarro and Diego Almagro portrayed in 1615 by the Inca painter Guamán Poma. Royal Library, Denmark. <ref>{{cite book|url=http://www5.kb.dk/permalink/2006/poma/44/en/text/?open=idm46287306358272|title=Nueva corónica y buen gobierno|page=17|year=1615|author=Guamán Poma|website=Royal Library, Denmark website}}</ref>
Captain Luis de Ávalos de Ayala kills Manco Inca Yupanqui in the conquest of Lima. Chronicle made in 1615 by the Inca painter Guamán Poma. Royal Library, Denmark. <ref>{{cite book|url=http://www5.kb.dk/permalink/2006/poma/394/en/text/?open=idm46287306144304|title=Nueva corónica y buen gobierno|page=157|author=Guamán Poma|year=1615|website=Royal Library, Denmark website}}</ref>
View of Lima and the Tapada limeña (a colonial women fashion) in a painting of 1842 by d'Orbigny and Benoît. Museum of the Americas, Spain. <ref>{{cite book|url=https://bvpb.mcu.es/es/consulta/registro.do?id=469709|website=Virtual Library of Bibliographic Heritage (Spain) site|title=Viaje pintoresco a las dos Américas, Asia y África : resúmen jeneral de todos los viajes y descubrimientos de... (1842)|series=Viaje pintoresco alrededor del mundo, a las dos Américas, Asia y Africa,4-6|year=1842|publisher=Imprenta y libreria de Juan Oliveres}}</ref>
Lima as seem from the Rímac District, painting of 1850 by Batta Molinelli.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://blog.pucp.edu.pe/blog/juanluisorrego/2010/04/09/la-flora-de-lima-introduccion/|title=La flora de Lima: introducción|date=9 April 2010|author=Juan Luis Orrego Penagos|publisher=Pontifical Catholic University of Peru}}</ref>
Colonial Calle de los Judíos (Jewish quarter) (Lima) in 1866 by Manuel A. Fuentes and Firmin Didot, Brothers, Sons & Co. University of Chicago Library.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=NhpEAQAAMAAJ&dq=Lima+or+Sketches+of+the+Capital+of+Peru%2C+Historical%2C+Statistical%2C+Administrative%2C+Commercial+and+Moral+Paris%3A+Firmin+Didot%2C+Brothers%2C+Son&pg=PP13|title=Lima or Sketches of the Capital of Peru, Historical, Statistical, Administrative, Commercial and Moral|author1=Manuel A. Fuentes|author2=Firmin Didot, Brothers, Sons & Co.|year=1866|location=University of Chicago Library}}</ref>
Colonial Calles de la Oca and de Bodegones (Lima) in 1866 by Manuel A. Fuentes and Firmin Didot, Brothers, Sons & Co. University of Chicago Library.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=NhpEAQAAMAAJ&dq=Lima+or+Sketches+of+the+Capital+of+Peru%2C+Historical%2C+Statistical%2C+Administrative%2C+Commercial+and+Moral+Paris%3A+Firmin+Didot%2C+Brothers%2C+Son&pg=PP13|title=Lima or Sketches of the Capital of Peru, Historical, Statistical, Administrative, Commercial and Moral|author1=Manuel A. Fuentes|author2=Firmin Didot, Brothers, Sons & Co.|year=1866|location=University of Chicago Library}}</ref>
Puente de Piedra Bridge, the former Arco del Puente Gate and the Walls of Lima in 1878 by El Viajero Ilustrado. Old Fund of the University of Seville.<ref>{{cite web|title=Puente De Piedra, Lima|website=Old Fund of the University of Seville|url=https://www.flickr.com/people/37667416@N04}}</ref>
The Museo de la Nación houses thousands of artifacts spanning the entire span of human occupation in Peru.
Museum of Italian Art It's the only European arts museum in Peru, under the administration of the National Culture Institute.
Larco Museum is a privately owned museum of pre-Columbian art that is housed in an 18th-century vice-royal building built over a 7th-century pre-Columbian pyramid.
National Museum of the Archaeology, Anthropology, and History of Peru is the largest and oldest museum in Peru.
Plaza de toros de Acho, the plaza is classified as a national historic monument. It is the oldest bullring in the Americas.
Estadio Nacional of Peru Its current capacity is 40,000 seats as stated by the Peruvian Football Federation.
Estadio Monumental "U" It is the highest capacity soccer stadium in South America and one of the largest in the world.
Lima Golf Club (San Isidro District)
Campo de Marte is one of the largest parks in the metropolitan area of Lima.

The Historic Centre of Lima, which includes part of the districts of Lima and Rímac, was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988 due to the importance that the city had during the Viceroyalty of Peru, leaving as testimony a large number of architectural legacies.

Gold coins minted by the Parisii (1st century BC)

Paris

Capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km² , making it the 34th most densely populated city in the world in 2020.

Capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km² , making it the 34th most densely populated city in the world in 2020.

Gold coins minted by the Parisii (1st century BC)
The Palais de la Cité and Sainte-Chapelle, viewed from the Left Bank, from the Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry (month of June) (1410)
The Hôtel de Sens, one of many remnants of the Middle Ages in Paris
The storming of the Bastille on 14 July 1789, by Jean-Pierre Houël
The Panthéon, a major landmark on the Rive Gauche, was completed in 1790.
The Eiffel Tower, under construction in November 1888, startled Parisians — and the world — with its modernity.
General Charles de Gaulle on the Champs-Élysées celebrating the liberation of Paris, 26 August 1944
Western Paris in 2016, as photographed by a SkySat satellite
Anti-terrorism demonstration on the Place de la République after the Charlie Hebdo shooting, 11 January 2015
Satellite image of Paris by Sentinel-2
Autumn in Paris
A map of the arrondissements of Paris
The Hôtel de Ville, or city hall, has been at the same site since 1357.
A map of the Greater Paris Metropolis (Métropole du Grand Paris) and its governing territories
The Élysée Palace, official residence of the President of the French Republic
The Palais-Royal, residence of the Conseil d'État
Police (Gendarmerie) motorcyclists in Paris
Camille Pissarro, Boulevard Montmartre, 1897, Hermitage Museum
Rue de Rivoli
Place des Vosges
Paris and its suburbs, as seen from the Spot Satellite
West of Paris seen from Tour Montparnasse in 2019
City proper, urban area, and metropolitan area population from 1800 to 2010
Sacré-Cœur in Montmartre
St-Gervais-et-St-Protais in Le Marais
The Eiffel Tower and the La Défense district
Employment by economic sector in the Paris area (petite couronne), with population and unemployment figures (2015)
Median income in Paris and its nearest departments in 2018 (high income in red, low income in yellow)
Tourists from around the world make the Louvre the most-visited art museum in the world.
The Passage Jouffroy, one of Paris's covered passages
The Axe historique, pictured here from Concorde to Grande Arche of La Défense
Pierre Mignard, Self-portrait, between 1670 and 1690, oil on canvas, 235 x, The Louvre
Auguste Renoir, Bal du moulin de la Galette, 1876, oil on canvas, 131 x, Musée d'Orsay
Musée d'Orsay
Musée du quai Branly
The Comédie Française (Salle Richelieu)
Victor Hugo
Jean-Paul Sartre
Olympia, a famous music hall
Charles Aznavour
Salah Zulfikar and Sabah in Paris and Love (1972)
Dining room of the Vagenende
Le Zimmer, on the Place du Châtelet, where Géo Lefèvre first suggested the idea of a Tour de France to Henri Desgrange in 1902
Les Deux Magots café on Boulevard Saint-Germain
Magdalena Frackowiak at Paris Fashion Week (Fall 2011)
Republican Guards parading on Bastille Day
The main building of the former University of Paris is now used by classes from Sorbonne University, New Sorbonne University and other autonomous campuses.
The École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), France's most prestigious university in the social sciences, is headquartered in the 6th arrondissement.
Sainte-Geneviève Library
Parc des Princes
2010 Tour de France, Champs Élysées
The French Open, played on red clay, is one of four Grand Slams in professional tennis.
The Gare du Nord railway station is the busiest in Europe.
The Paris Métro is the busiest subway network in the European Union.
In 2020 Paris–Charles de Gaulle Airport was the busiest airport in Europe and the eighth-busiest airport in the world.
Ring roads of Paris
Vélib' at the Place de la Bastille
A view of the Seine, the Île de la Cité and a Bateau Mouche
The lawns of the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont on a sunny day
The Passerelle de l'Avre, crossing the Seine and establishing a link between the Bois de Boulogne and Saint-Cloud in Hauts-de-Seine, is the City of Paris's westernmost point.
The Paris Catacombs hold the remains of approximately 6 million people.
The Hôtel-Dieu de Paris, the oldest hospital in the city
Agence France-Presse Headquarters in Paris
Column dedicated to Paris near the Baths of Diocletian in Rome
Sculpture dedicated to Rome in the square Paul Painlevé in Paris

The historical district along the Seine in the city centre has been classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1991; popular landmarks there include the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris on the Île de la Cité, now closed for renovation after the 15 April 2019 fire.