Ubuntu version history

Ubuntu 12.04Ubuntu 10.10Ubuntu 9.04Ubuntu 10.04 LTSUbuntu 14.04Ubuntu 16.04 LTSIntrepid IbexMaverick MeerkatNatty NarwhalUbuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx
Ubuntu releases are made semiannually by Canonical Ltd, the developers of the Ubuntu operating system, using the year and month of the release as a version number.wikipedia
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Ubuntu

Ubuntu LinuxUbuntu operating systemUbuntu (operating system)
Ubuntu releases are made semiannually by Canonical Ltd, the developers of the Ubuntu operating system, using the year and month of the release as a version number.
The latest release is 19.10 ("Eoan Ermine"), and the most recent long-term support release is 18.04 LTS ("Bionic Beaver"), which is supported until 2023 under public support and until 2028 as a paid option.

Ubiquity (software)

UbiquitymintInstallUbuntu Live CD installer
Ubuntu 6.06 included several new features, including having the Live CD and Install CD merged onto one disc, a graphical installer on Live CD (Ubiquity), Usplash on shutdown as well as startup, a network manager for easy switching of multiple wired and wireless connections, Humanlooks theme implemented using Tango guidelines, based on Clearlooks and featuring orange colors instead of brown, and GDebi graphical installer for package files.
It was first introduced in Ubuntu 6.06 LTS "Dapper Drake") At program start, it allows the user to change the language to a local language if they prefer.

Software Updater

Update Managerprogram updaters
Ubuntu 5.04 added many new features including an Update Manager, upgrade notifier, readahead and grepmap, suspend, hibernate and standby support, dynamic frequency scaling for processors, Ubuntu hardware database, Kickstart installation, and APT authentication.
The application was originally called Update Manager; it was announced in May 2012 that starting with Ubuntu 12.10 the name would change to Software Updater to better describe its functions.

Ubuntu Netbook Edition

Ubuntu Netbook RemixDell Ubuntu NBRDell Ubuntu Netbook Remix
The first version of the Ubuntu Netbook Remix was also introduced.
Ubuntu Netbook Edition (UNE), known as Ubuntu Netbook Remix (UNR) prior to the release of Ubuntu 10.04, is a discontinued version of the Ubuntu operating system (OS) that had been optimized to enable it to work better on netbooks and other devices with small screens or with the Intel Atom CPU.

Tomboy (software)

TomboyTomboy Notes
Ubuntu 6.10 added several new features including a heavily modified Human theme, Upstart init daemon, automated crash reports (Apport), Tomboy note taking application, and F-Spot photo manager.
Tomboy is part of the GNOME desktop environment personal information management software and achieved widespread popularity as the default note taking application in early Ubuntu releases.

Upstart (software)

Upstart
Ubuntu 6.10 added several new features including a heavily modified Human theme, Upstart init daemon, automated crash reports (Apport), Tomboy note taking application, and F-Spot photo manager.

Ubuntu One

Ubuntu One Music StoreUbuntu One Music
The default filesystem is ext4, and the Ubuntu One client, which interfaces with Canonical's new online storage system, is installed by default.
Ubuntu One had a client application that ran on Ubuntu 9.04 and later, Windows XP or newer, and Mac OS X 10.6 and higher.

Empathy (software)

EmpathyEmpathy Instant Messenger
The desktop installation of Ubuntu 9.10 replaced Pidgin with Empathy Instant Messenger as its default instant messaging client.
Empathy has been included in the GNOME desktop since its version 2.24, in Ubuntu since version 9.10 (Karmic Koala), and in Fedora since version 12 (Constantine); Empathy has replaced Pidgin as their default messenger application.

Unity (user interface)

UnityUbuntu UnityUnity Dash
New features included the new Unity interface for the Netbook Edition, a new default photo manager, Shotwell, replacing F-Spot, the ability to purchase applications in the Software Center, and an official Ubuntu font used by default.
Unity debuted in the netbook edition of Ubuntu 10.10.

OpenStack

OpenStack SwiftSwiftNeutron
The OpenStack cloud computing platform was added in this release.
In 2011, developers of the Ubuntu Linux distribution adopted OpenStack with an unsupported technology preview of the OpenStack "Bexar" release for Ubuntu 11.04 "Natty Narwhal".

Compiz

Compiz FusionBerylDavid Reveman
Ubuntu 7.04 included several new features, among them a migration assistant to help former Microsoft Windows users transition to Ubuntu, support for Kernel-based Virtual Machine, assisted codec and restricted drivers installation including Adobe Flash, Java, MP3 support, easier installation of Nvidia and ATI drivers, Compiz desktop effects, support for Wi-Fi Protected Access, the addition of Sudoku and chess, a disk usage analyzer (baobab), GNOME Control Center, and zeroconf support for many devices.
While 0.9.6 never officially released, Compiz 0.9.7.0 was released a month ahead of enterprise-targeted Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support) and declared stable.

Ubuntu Software Center

Software CenterUbuntu App Store
It also debuted a new application called the Ubuntu Software Center that unifies package management.
Development was ended in 2015 and in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Long-term support

LTSlong term supportExtended-support release
Every fourth release, occurring in the second quarter of even-numbered years, has been designated as a long-term support (LTS) release.

Shotwell (software)

Shotwell
New features included the new Unity interface for the Netbook Edition, a new default photo manager, Shotwell, replacing F-Spot, the ability to purchase applications in the Software Center, and an official Ubuntu font used by default.
In 2010, it replaced F-Spot as the standard image tool for several GNOME-based Linux distributions, including Fedora in version 13 and Ubuntu in its 10.10 Maverick Meerkat release.

Ubuntu (typeface)

Ubuntu fontUbuntu Font FamilyUbuntu Font License
New features included the new Unity interface for the Netbook Edition, a new default photo manager, Shotwell, replacing F-Spot, the ability to purchase applications in the Software Center, and an official Ubuntu font used by default.
The font was first introduced in October 2010 with the release of Ubuntu 10.10 in four versions Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic in English.

Pitivi

It also included a video editor for the first time, Pitivi.
In April 2010, with the launch of Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx, PiTiVi version 0.13.4 became the first default movie editor offered as part of the Ubuntu ISO CD.

Plymouth (software)

Plymouth
Plymouth was also introduced, allowing boot animations.
Ubuntu includes it in the Ubuntu 10.04 LTS "Lucid Lynx" release shipped on April 29, 2010.

Desktop search

search systemDesktop search enginefile indexing and search
Ubuntu 7.10 included several new features, among them AppArmor security framework, fast desktop search, a Firefox plug-in manager (Ubufox), a graphical configuration tool for X.Org, full NTFS support (read/write) via NTFS-3G, and a revamped printing system with PDF printing by default.
Ubuntu Linux didn't have desktop search until release Feisty Fawn 7.04.

Chromium (web browser)

ChromiumChromium web browser(Chromium based)
Consideration was given to changing the default browser from Mozilla Firefox to Chromium, but problems with timely updates to Ubuntu's Chromium package caused developers to retain Firefox for this release.
Ubuntu started offering Chromium through the Ubuntu Software Center starting with Ubuntu 10.04 LTS as part of the "universe" repository.

Paper cut bug

One Hundred Paper CutsPaper-cut bug
In June 2009, Canonical created the One Hundred Paper Cuts project, focusing developers to fix minor usability issues.
Initially the project was intended to have Ubuntu developers and users identify and fix one hundred minor bugs that adversely affect the Ubuntu user experience and complete the work to be included in the release of Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala.

Mir (software)

MirMir display serverMir (display server)
Ubuntu 13.10 was intended to be the first Ubuntu release to replace the aging X Window System (X11) with the Mir display server, with X11 programs to have operated through the XMir compatibility layer.
In June 2013, Canonical's publicly announced milestones for Mir development were to ship Unity 7 with XMir by default and a pure X11 fallback mode with Ubuntu 13.10, remove the X11 fallback with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Unity 8 running natively on Mir by Ubuntu 14.10.

GNOME Evolution

EvolutionNovell EvolutionEvolution (software)
Mozilla Thunderbird has replaced the GNOME Evolution email client.
Ubuntu has replaced Evolution with Mozilla Thunderbird as the default e-mail client since Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot.

VMware Workstation

VMWareWorkstation
Improvements for running Ubuntu on a VMWare virtual machine include integration of open-vm-tools within Ubuntu, allowing for bi-directional clipboard and file sharing.

Mono (software)

MonoMonoTouchMono Framework
This release also switched the default media player from Banshee back to Rhythmbox and dropped the Tomboy note-taking application and the supporting Mono framework as well.
In November 2011 at a Ubuntu Developer Summit, developers voted to have the Mono-based Banshee media player removed from Ubuntu's default installation beginning on Ubuntu 12.04; although reported reasonings included performance issues on ARM architecture, blocking issues on its GTK+ 3 version, and it being, in their opinion, "not well maintained", speculation also surfaced that the decision was also influenced by a desire to remove Mono from the base distribution, as the remaining programs dependent on Mono, gbrainy and Tomboy, were also to be removed.

List of Linux distributions

List of Ubuntu-based distributionsLinux distributionsderivatives
* List of Linux distributions