Ukraine national football team

UkraineUkraine national teamUkrainian national football teamUkrainian national teamnational teamUkrainian SSRUkrainianUkrainian internationalUkraine senior teamsenior national team
The Ukraine national football team represents Ukraine in international football matches and is controlled by the Ukrainian Association of Football, the governing body for football in Ukraine.wikipedia
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Football in Ukraine

UkraineUkrainian footballfootball clubs in Ukraine
The Ukraine national football team represents Ukraine in international football matches and is controlled by the Ukrainian Association of Football, the governing body for football in Ukraine.
The Ukraine national senior team has qualified for the FIFA World Cup once, in 2006, where they reached the quarter-finals led by the former Soviet football star player Oleh Blokhin.

Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex

Republican StadiumOlympic StadiumNSC Olimpiyskiy
Ukraine's home ground is the Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Kiev.
Following extensive renovation works, including the construction of a new roof, the stadium was reopened on 9 October 2011 with a performance by Shakira and had its international inauguration with a 3–3 friendly draw by Ukraine against Germany on 11 November 2011.

UEFA Euro 2012

Euro 201220122012 UEFA European Football Championship
As the host nation, Ukraine automatically qualified for UEFA Euro 2012.
Fifty-one teams entered to compete for the fourteen remaining places in the finals, alongside co-hosts Poland and Ukraine.

2014 FIFA World Cup

2014 World Cup2014World Cup
This marked the first time in Ukraine's five play-off appearances that it managed to win such a tie, previously having been unsuccessful in the play-off ties for the Euro 2000, 2002 World Cup, 2010 World Cup and 2014 World Cup.
The highest ranked team not to qualify was Ukraine (ranked 16th), while the lowest ranked team that did qualify was Australia (ranked 62nd).

Belarus national football team

BelarusBelarus BBelarus national team
Along the way, Ukraine managed to defeat the national teams of Belarus and Transcaucasus.
The first FIFA-recognized international was a friendly against Ukraine on 28 October 1992, and their first win came in a match against Luxembourg on 12 October 1994.

2006 FIFA World Cup

2006 World Cup2006World Cup
The team's biggest success on the world stage was reaching the quarter-finals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which also marked the team's debut in the finals of a major championship.
Eight nations qualified for the finals for the first time: Angola, Czech Republic, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, and Serbia and Montenegro.

2010 FIFA World Cup

2010 World Cup2010World Cup
This marked the first time in Ukraine's five play-off appearances that it managed to win such a tie, previously having been unsuccessful in the play-off ties for the Euro 2000, 2002 World Cup, 2010 World Cup and 2014 World Cup.
Teams that failed to qualify for this tournament included Saudi Arabia, which had qualified for the previous four tournaments; Tunisia and Croatia, both of whom had qualified for the previous three finals; Costa Rica, Ecuador, Poland and Sweden, who had qualified for the previous two editions; 2006 quarter-finalists Ukraine and Euro 2008 semi-finalists Russia and Turkey.

UEFA Euro 2016

Euro 201620162016 UEFA European Championship
Four years later, Ukraine qualified for Euro 2016 via the play-off route, the first time qualifying for a UEFA European Championship via the qualifying process, as they finished in third place in their qualifying group.
Similarly, both Austria and Ukraine completed successful qualification campaigns for the first time, having only previously qualified as hosts (of 2008 and 2012 respectively).

Andriy Shevchenko

ShevchenkoAndrei ShevchenkoAndrij Shevchenko
In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskiy.
Andriy Mykolayovych Shevchenko (Андрій Миколайович Шевченко, ; born 29 September 1976) is a Ukrainian politician, football manager and former professional footballer who played for Dynamo Kyiv, Milan, Chelsea and the Ukraine national team as a striker.

Russia national football team

RussiaRussian national teamRussia national team
After the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Russia took the place of the Soviet Union national team in the qualifying tournament for the 1994 World Cup. Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuriy Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union's five-year UEFA coefficient, despite being earned in part by Ukrainian players (for example, in the final of the last successful event, Euro 1988, under the direction of Valery Lobanovsky, 7 out of starting 11 players were Ukrainians ), were transferred to the direct descendant of the Soviet national team – the Russia national team.
The Russian squad consisted of veterans like goalkeeper Stanislav Cherchesov, Aleksandr Borodyuk and players like Viktor Onopko, Oleg Salenko, Dmitri Cheryshev, Aleksandr Mostovoi, Vladimir Beschastnykh, and Valeri Karpin (some of these Russian players could have chosen to play for example the Ukrainian national football team but the Football Federation of Ukraine had failed to secure recognition in time to compete in the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification ).

Ilya Tsymbalar

Ilia TsymbalarTsymbalarIllya Tsymbalar
Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuriy Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union.
A midfielder, he represented both Ukraine and Russia on the international level.

Viktor Leonenko

LeonenkoVictor Leonenko
Viktor Leonenko agreed on transfer from Dynamo Moscow to Dynamo Kiev.
Viktor Yevhenovych Leonenko (Виктор Евгеньевич Леоненко; born 5 October 1969) is a former footballer and Ukraine international who played as a forward.

Anatoliy Tymoshchuk

Anatoliy TymoschukTymoshchukAnatolii Tymoshchuk
In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskiy.
He is also a former captain of the Ukraine national team before retiring from international football in 2016.

UEFA coefficient

UEFA club coefficientUEFA country coefficientUEFA coefficients
The Soviet Union's five-year UEFA coefficient, despite being earned in part by Ukrainian players (for example, in the final of the last successful event, Euro 1988, under the direction of Valery Lobanovsky, 7 out of starting 11 players were Ukrainians ), were transferred to the direct descendant of the Soviet national team – the Russia national team.

FC Dynamo Kyiv

Dynamo KyivDynamo KievDinamo Kiev
Viktor Leonenko agreed on transfer from Dynamo Moscow to Dynamo Kiev.
The first team of Dynamo became a base team for the Soviet Union national football team in the 1970–1980s and the Ukraine national football team in the 1990–2000s.

Serhiy Rebrov

Sergei RebrovRebrovSergiy Rebrov
In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskiy.
From his debut in 1992, he was capped 75 times by Ukraine, scoring 15 goals.

Oleksandr Shovkovskiy

Oleksandr ShovkovskyOleksandr ShovkovskyiShovkovskiy
In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskiy.
By next year he was already called up to the Ukraine national football team.

Viktor Onopko

OnopkoVictor Onopko
Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuriy Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union. Among those were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would later represent Ukraine).
Although he was eligible to play for Ukraine, Onopko chose to play for Russia and amassed 109 caps (plus four for the CIS, including in Euro 92), the first coming in 1992.

Serhiy Kovalets

Kovalets
For the game against Hungary, only Ivan Hetsko and Oleh Luzhny had previous experience of playing at international level; other players had only played for the Soviet Olympic football team, while Serhiy Kovalets played for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of People of the USSR in 1986.
Kovalets played 10 matches for Ukraine between 1992 and 1994.

Akhrik Tsveiba

Akhrik TsveybaTsveiba
Among those were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would later represent Ukraine).
In 1990, he left for FC Dynamo Kyiv, where he was nominated by Ukraine.

UEFA Euro 1992

Euro 19921992Euro 92
At the same time, the opponent, while failing to qualify for the Euro 1992, was preparing for 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification.
The CIS team represented the following ex-Soviet republics: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Tajikistan.

Ivan Hetsko

HetskoIvan Getsko
For the game against Hungary, only Ivan Hetsko and Oleh Luzhny had previous experience of playing at international level; other players had only played for the Soviet Olympic football team, while Serhiy Kovalets played for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of People of the USSR in 1986.
Ivan Hetsko (born 6 April 1968) was a Soviet and Ukrainian international football player who played 4 matches for the Ukraine national football team.

Andriy Husin

Andriy HusynAndrii HusinGusin
During the summer they played one away game against Croatia, losing 3-1, with a goal scored Andriy Husin and one of the Croatian goals scored by Davor Šuker.
He frequently played in the Ukraine national football team, and was one of Ukraine's most capped players.

Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko

Alexei MikhailichenkoOleksiy MykhailychenkoAleksei Mikhailichenko
Among those were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would later represent Ukraine).
He was head coach of the Ukraine national football team senior side for two years after that.

Slovenia national football team

SloveniaSlovenian national teamSlovenia national team
Their next home game against Slovenia ended goalless.
In 1999, Slovenia qualified for the UEFA Euro 2000 after eliminating Ukraine in a playoff.