Ukrainian alphabet

UkrainianUkrainian CyrillicUkrainian orthographyUkrainian Cyrillic alphabetCyrillicorthography for the Ukrainian languageSoviet linguistic reform of 1933ukUkrainian Cyrilic letterUkrainian letter
The Ukrainian alphabet is the set of letters used to write Ukrainian, the official language of Ukraine.wikipedia
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Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
The Ukrainian alphabet is the set of letters used to write Ukrainian, the official language of Ukraine.
Written Ukrainian uses a variant of the Cyrillic script (see Ukrainian alphabet).

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
The Ukrainian alphabet is the set of letters used to write Ukrainian, the official language of Ukraine.
Ukrainian is the official language and its alphabet is Cyrillic.

Romanization of Ukrainian

translit.Romanizationtr.
See romanisation of Ukrainian for details of specific romanisation systems.
Ukrainian is natively written in its own Ukrainian alphabet, which is based on the Cyrillic script.

Ukrainian Ye

ЄЄ єYe
It is a separate letter in the Ukrainian alphabet (8th position since 1992, 7th position before then), the Pannonian Rusyn alphabet, and both the Carpathian Rusyn alphabets; in all of these, it comes directly after Е.

Ghe with upturn

ҐgeUkrainian letter ''ge
The Ukrainian letter ge ґ, and the phonetic combinations ль, льо, ля were eliminated, and Russian etymological forms were reintroduced (for example, the use of -іа- in place of -ія-).
It is part of the Ukrainian alphabet, the Pannonian Rusyn alphabet and both the Carpathian Rusyn alphabets, and also some variants of Urum and Belarusian (i.e. Taraškievica) alphabets.

Alphabet

alphabeticalphabetsalphabetical
The Ukrainian alphabet is the set of letters used to write Ukrainian, the official language of Ukraine.
Cyrillic alphabets include the Serbian, Macedonian, Bulgarian, Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian.

Dotted I (Cyrillic)

Іdecimal IІ і
It is used in the orthographies of Belarusian, Kazakh, Khakas, Komi, Carpathian Rusyn and Ukrainian and quite often, but not always, is the equivalent of the Cyrillic letter i as used in Russian and other languages.

Soft sign

ЬЬ ьsoft
The soft sign ь has no meaning when written by itself, but when written after a consonant, it indicates that the consonant is soft (palatalized).
Ukrainian uses a quite different repertoire of vowel letters from those of Russian and Belarusian, and iotation is usually expressed by an apostrophe in Ukrainian.

I (Cyrillic)

ИИ иCyrillic letter I
The letter is the eleventh letter of the Ukrainian alphabet and it represents sound, which is a separate phoneme in Ukrainian.

Yi (Cyrillic)

ЇYiЇ ї
It is used in the Ukrainian alphabet, the Pannonian Rusyn alphabet, and the Prešov Rusyn alphabet of Slovakia.

Drahomanivka

These included Oleksiy Pavlovskiy's Grammar, Panteleimon Kulish's Kulishivka, the Drahomanivka promoted by Mykhailo Drahomanov, and Yevhen Zhelekhivsky's Zhelekhivka, which standardized the letters ї (ji) and ґ (g).
Drahomanivka was a proposed reform of the Ukrainian alphabet and orthography, promoted by Mykhailo Drahomanov.

Belarusian alphabet

Belarusian?be
Notable were replacing with ( (CYRILLIC) JE ), and/or replacing,,, with (or else with ),,,, respectively (as in the Serbian alphabet), replacing with, introducing (see also Ge with upturn; both proposed changes would match the Ukrainian alphabet) and/or introducing special graphemes/ligatures for affricates:, etc. Even the introduction of the Latin script was contemplated at one moment (as proposed by Zhylunovich at the Belarusian Academical Conference (1926)).

Rusyn language

RusynRuthenianCarpatho-Rusyn
The Civil Script eliminated some archaic letters, but reinforced an etymological basis for the alphabet, influencing Mykhaylo Maksymovych's nineteenth-century Galician Maksymovychivka script for Ukrainian, and its descendant, the Pankevychivka, which is still in use, in a slightly modified form, for the Rusyn language in Carpathian Ruthenia.
It includes all the letters of the Ukrainian alphabet plus ё, ы, and ъ.

Mykhaylo Maksymovych

Mykhailo MaksymovychMaksymovychMikhail Maksimovich
The Civil Script eliminated some archaic letters, but reinforced an etymological basis for the alphabet, influencing Mykhaylo Maksymovych's nineteenth-century Galician Maksymovychivka script for Ukrainian, and its descendant, the Pankevychivka, which is still in use, in a slightly modified form, for the Rusyn language in Carpathian Ruthenia.
In his collections of folksongs, Maksymovych used a new orthography for the Ukrainian language which was based on etymology.

Ems Ukaz

Ems Ukaseban on the Ukrainian language in the Russian Empire in 1876Ems decree
One such decree was the notorious 1876 Ems Ukaz, which banned the Kulishivka and imposed a Russian orthography until 1905 (called the Yaryzhka, after the Russian letter yery ы).
Ukrainian lyrics and dictionaries would be allowed, but the Kulishivka Ukrainian alphabet was still prohibited, and such publications would have to write Ukrainian with Russian orthography.

Mykola Skrypnyk

Mykola Oleksiiovych SkrypnykN. A. SkrypnikNikolai Skripnik
At the conference, a standardized Ukrainian orthography and method for transliterating foreign words were established, a compromise between Galician and Soviet proposals, called the Kharkiv Orthography, or Skrypnykivka, after Ukrainian Commissar of Education Mykola Skrypnyk.
The conference settled on a compromise between Soviet and Galician orthographies, and published the first standardized Ukrainian alphabet accepted in all of Ukraine.

Yery

ЫЫ ы Ы Yery
One such decree was the notorious 1876 Ems Ukaz, which banned the Kulishivka and imposed a Russian orthography until 1905 (called the Yaryzhka, after the Russian letter yery ы).
In the Ukrainian alphabet, yery is not used as the language lacks the sound.

Panteleimon Kulish

P. KulishKulishPanteleymon Kulish
These included Oleksiy Pavlovskiy's Grammar, Panteleimon Kulish's Kulishivka, the Drahomanivka promoted by Mykhailo Drahomanov, and Yevhen Zhelekhivsky's Zhelekhivka, which standardized the letters ї (ji) and ґ (g).
At this time, he published his famous Notes on Southern Rus' in which he pioneered a new Ukrainian orthography for the Ukrainian vernacular, the Kulishivka alphabet, based on phonetics rather than etymology.

ISO/IEC 8859-5

ISO 8859-5ISO-8859-528595
Ge was officially banned in the Soviet Ukraine from 1933 to 1990; it is missing from some computer character encodings and fonts, such as ISO-8859-5 and MS-DOS Cyrillic.
It would also have been usable for Ukrainian in the Soviet Union from 1933–1990, but it is missing the Ukrainian letter ge, ґ, which is required in Ukrainian orthography before and since, and during that period outside Soviet Ukraine.

Ukrainian Latin alphabet

LatynkaŁatynkaLatin alphabet for Ukrainian
There have also been several historical proposals for a native Latin alphabet for Ukrainian, but none have caught on.
A Latin alphabet for the Ukrainian language (called Latynka) has been proposed or imposed several times in the history in Ukraine, but has never challenged the conventional Cyrillic Ukrainian alphabet.

Euro-Ukrainian alphabet

In most cases the official Ukrainian Cyrillic alphabet is used in Ukraine and abroad, though there has been an increase in the use of some versions of Latynka on the internet.

KOI8-U

218661168KOI8-UKRAINE
KOI8-U stands for Код обміну інформації 8 бітний — український, "Code for informationinterchange 8 bit — Ukrainian", analogous to "ASCII".

Pannonian Rusyn

RusynRusyn languagePannonian Rusyn alphabet
It includes all the letters of the Ukrainian alphabet except І/і.