Ukrainian embroidery

embroideredembroidery
Ukrainian embroidery (вишивка, vyshyvka) occupies an important place among the various branches of Ukrainian decorative arts.wikipedia
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Ukrainian culture

UkrainiancultureCulture of Ukraine
Embroidery has a rich history in Ukraine, and has long appeared in Ukrainian folk dress as well as played a part in traditional Ukrainian weddings and other celebrations.
The countries strong tradition of folk art and embroidery continues to this day, with Ukrainian embroidery often considered an art form in itself.

Ukrainian wedding traditions

Ukrainian wedding ceremonyUkrainian weddingsweddings
Embroidery has a rich history in Ukraine, and has long appeared in Ukrainian folk dress as well as played a part in traditional Ukrainian weddings and other celebrations.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
Ukrainian embroidery (вишивка, vyshyvka) occupies an important place among the various branches of Ukrainian decorative arts. In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.
Ukrainian embroidery, weaving and lace-making are used in traditional folk dress and in traditional celebrations.

Vyshyvanka

Ukrainian embroidered shirtUkrainian national costumesvyshyvanky
The primary object of clothing that was decorated with embroidery was the shirt or vyshyvanka.
Ukrainian vyshyvanka is distinguished by local embroidery features specific to Ukrainian embroidery.

Ochipok

Other elements of clothing are also embroidered, including scarves, skirts, aprons, men's caps and trousers, sleeveless jackets, kozhukh and kozhushanka (sheepskin coats), sashes, ochipok, etc. In some areas, bed linens were also embroidered.
The Ochipok (Очіпок, also намітка, namitka; перемітка, peremitka; серпанок, serpanok; рантух, rantukh; склендячка, sklendyachka; хустка, khustka, повойник) is a married woman's headdress as part of traditional Ukrainian folk dress, often decorated with Ukrainian embroidery.

Kozhukh

Other elements of clothing are also embroidered, including scarves, skirts, aprons, men's caps and trousers, sleeveless jackets, kozhukh and kozhushanka (sheepskin coats), sashes, ochipok, etc. In some areas, bed linens were also embroidered.
Generally worn in the winter, the kozhukh was normally made of sheepskin, sometimes decorated with embroidery and with leather, cords, tassels, and other accessories.

Lozenge

diamondlozengesdiamonds
The lozenge shape is a common motif and represents a sown field and female fertility.
The ancient lozenge pattern often shows up in Diamond vault architecture, in traditional dress patterns of Slavic peoples, and in traditional Ukrainian embroidery.

Kozhushanka

Other elements of clothing are also embroidered, including scarves, skirts, aprons, men's caps and trousers, sleeveless jackets, kozhukh and kozhushanka (sheepskin coats), sashes, ochipok, etc. In some areas, bed linens were also embroidered.
It was embellished by a couple of bouquets of various color and, like most Ukrainian clothing of the time, embroidered, particularly on the chest.

Embroidery

embroideredembroidererembroider
Embroidery has a rich history in Ukraine, and has long appeared in Ukrainian folk dress as well as played a part in traditional Ukrainian weddings and other celebrations.

Folk costume

national costumenational dresstraditional dress
Embroidery has a rich history in Ukraine, and has long appeared in Ukrainian folk dress as well as played a part in traditional Ukrainian weddings and other celebrations.

Poltava

Poltava, UkraineCity of PoltavaPoltava Military Academy
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches.

Kiev

KyivKiev, UkraineKyiv, Ukraine
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches. There are eleventh-century examples of embroidery in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev on frescos and miniatures.

Chernihiv

ChernigovCzernihówChernigiv
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches.

Volhynia

VolynWołyńVolynia
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches.

Polesia

PolesiePolissyaPolissia
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches.

Bukovina

Northern BukovinaBucovinaBukovyna
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches.

Hutsuls

HutsulHuculHutsul people
From Poltava, Kiev, and Chernihiv in the east, to Volyn and Polissia in the northwest, to Bukovyna, and the Hutsul area in the southwest, the designs have a long history which defines its ornamental motifs and compositions, as well as its favorite choice of colors and types of stitches.

Herodotus

HerodotosHerodotus of HalicarnassusHerod.
In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.

Darius the Great

Darius IDariusDarius I of Persia
In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.

Thracians

Thracianancient ThraceThrace
In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.

Dacians

DacianGeto-DaciansDaco
In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.

Balkans

Balkan PeninsulaBalkanWestern Balkans
In 513 BC, Herodotus, the famous Greek historian, in describing the invasion of Darius, mentioned that the Thracian-Dacian people who lived in what is now the Balkans and western Ukraine used embroidery to decorate their clothes.

Deities of Slavic religion

HorsKupalaBerehynia
Other early examples of embroideries include pre-Christian goddess motifs, such as Berehynia.

Saint Sophia's Cathedral, Kiev

Saint Sophia Cathedral in KievSaint Sophia's CathedralSaint Sophia Cathedral
There are eleventh-century examples of embroidery in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev on frescos and miniatures.