Ukrainians

UkrainianUkrainian peopleUkraineethnic UkrainiansUkrainian descentethnic UkrainianUkrainian-bornRuthenian/UkrainianUkrainian nationRuthenians
Ukrainians are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the seventh-largest nation in Europe and the third-largest among the Slavic peoples after the Russians and Poles.wikipedia
3,360 Related Articles

East Slavs

East SlavicEastern SlavicEastern Slavs
Ukrainians are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the seventh-largest nation in Europe and the third-largest among the Slavic peoples after the Russians and Poles.
Formerly the main population of the loose medieval Kievan Rus federation state, by the seventeenth century they evolved into the Belarusian, Russian, Rusyn and Ukrainian people.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
Ukrainians are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the seventh-largest nation in Europe and the third-largest among the Slavic peoples after the Russians and Poles.
The Antes were the ancestors of Ukrainians: White Croats, Severians, Polans, Drevlyans, Dulebes, Ulichians, and Tiverians.

Rusyns

RusynCarpatho-RusynRusyn people
The people of Ukraine have historically been known as "Rusyns (Ruthenians)", "Little Russians", and "Cossacks", among others. Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
Unlike their neighbors to the east, who adopted the use of the ethnonym Ukrainians in the early 20th century, Rusyns kept and preserved their original name.

Russians

RussianRussian peopleethnic Russian
Ukrainians are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the seventh-largest nation in Europe and the third-largest among the Slavic peoples after the Russians and Poles. In comparison to their northern and eastern neighbors, Ukrainians have a similar percentage of Haplogroup R1a-Z280 (43%) in their population—compare Belarusians, Russians, and Lithuanians and (55%, 46%, and 42% respectively).
The Russians share many historical and cultural traits with other European peoples and especially with other East Slavic ethnic groups, specifically Belarusians and Ukrainians.

Zaporozhian Cossacks

Zaporozhian CossackCossacksZaporizhian Cossacks
The connection with the Zaporozhian Cossacks especially, is emphasized in the Ukrainian national anthem, "We are, brothers, of Cossack kin".
In the 16th century, a great organizer, Dmytro Vyshnevetsky, a Ukrainian noble, united these different groups into a strong military organization.

Carpathian Ruthenia

TranscarpathiaSubcarpathian RusSubcarpathian Ruthenia
The appellation Ukrainians initially came into common usage in Central Ukraine and did not take hold in Galicia and Bukovyna until the latter part of the 19th century, in Transcarpathia until the 1930s, and in the Prešov Region until the late 1940s.
It is an ethnically diverse region, inhabited by Rusyn, Lemko, Hungarian, Ukrainian, Slovak, Romanian, Bulgarian and Russian populations.

Ukrainian Canadians

UkrainianUkrainian CanadianUkrainian-Canadian
Today, large ethnic Ukrainian minorities reside in Russia, Canada, the United States, Brazil, Kazakhstan, Italy and Argentina.
Ukrainian Canadians (Українські канадці, Україноканадці; Canadiens d'origine ukrainienne) are Canadian citizens of Ukrainian descent or Ukrainian-born people who immigrated to Canada.

Ruthenians

RuthenianRuthenesRusyns
People of these territories were usually called Rus or Rusyns (known as Ruthenians in Western and Central Europe). Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
In its broadest usage, "Ruthenians" or "Ruthenes" referred to peoples which were ancestors of the modern Belarusians, Russians, Rusyns and Ukrainians.

Zaporozhian Sich

Zaporizhian SichZaporizhian CossacksSich
In the 16th – 17th centuries, with the establishment of the Zaporizhian Sich, the notion of Ukraine as a separate country with a separate ethnic identity came into being.
The Zaporozhian Sich emerged as a method of defence by Slavic colonists against the frequent and devastating raids of Crimean Tatars, who captured and enslaved hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians, Belorusians and Poles in operations called "the harvesting of the steppe".

Cossacks

CossackUkrainian CossacksUkrainian Cossack
The people of Ukraine have historically been known as "Rusyns (Ruthenians)", "Little Russians", and "Cossacks", among others.
Some historians suggest that the Cossack people were of mixed ethnic origins, descending from Russians, Ukrainians, Belarusians, Turks, Tatars, and others who settled or passed through the vast Steppe.

Green Ukraine

Zeleny KlynFar EastUkrainian Republic of the Far East
Approximately 800,000 people of Ukrainian ancestry live in the Russian Far East in an area known historically as "Green Ukraine".
After the establishment of the Bolshevik Far Eastern Republic on April 6, 1920, Far Eastern areas with an ethnic Ukrainian majority attempted to secede and establish an entity called Green Ukraine.

Bukovina

Northern BukovinaBucovinaBukovyna
The appellation Ukrainians initially came into common usage in Central Ukraine and did not take hold in Galicia and Bukovyna until the latter part of the 19th century, in Transcarpathia until the 1930s, and in the Prešov Region until the late 1940s.
Ruthenians is an archaic name for Ukrainians, while the Hutsuls are a regional Ukrainian subgroup.

Tivertsi

TiveriansTivertsyTivercians
East Slavic tribes cited as "proto-Ukrainian" include the Volhynians, Derevlianians, Polianians, and Siverianians and the less significant Ulychians, Tivertsians, and White Croats.
The Tivertsi were one of the tribes that formed the Moldovan and Ukrainian ethnicities, namely the sub-ethnic and historic region of Podolia.

Polish census of 2011

2011 census2011 Polish Census2011 Polish national census
The number of Ukrainians in Poland amounted to some 51,000 people in 2011 (according to the Polish Census).

Ruthenia

RusRuthenianAll Rus
People of these territories were usually called Rus or Rusyns (known as Ruthenians in Western and Central Europe). From the 14th to the 16th centuries, the Western portions of the European part of what is now known as Russia, the territories of northern Ukraine and Belarus (Western Rus') were largely known as Rus', continuing the tradition of Kievan Rus'.
The use of the term Rus/Russia in the lands of ancient Rus' survived longer as a name used by Ukrainians for Ukraine.

Hutsuls

HutsulHuculHutsul people
Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
While they often have been officially designated as a subgroup of Ukrainians, Hutsuls mostly regard themselves as a part of a broader Rusyn ethnicity, alongside two other groups from the cross-border region of Transcarpathia: the Boykos and Lemkos.

Lemkos

LemkoLemko peopleLemki
Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
Their affiliation with other ethnicities is controversial, although individual Lemkos generally self-identify as a sub-group of Rusyns and/or Ukrainians.

Shche ne vmerla Ukraina

Ukrainian national anthemnational anthem of Ukraineanthem of Ukraine
The connection with the Zaporozhian Cossacks especially, is emphasized in the Ukrainian national anthem, "We are, brothers, of Cossack kin".
At the dawn of the Soviet Union, when it was decided that each separate Soviet republic could have its own anthem, the poem "Shche ne vmerla Ukrayina" was rejected in order to suppress separatism amongst Ukrainians.

Ukrainian diaspora

diasporaEthnic UkrainiansUkrainians
But news and information about what was going on reached the West and evoked public responses in Polish-ruled Western Ukraine and in the Ukrainian diaspora.
The Ukrainian diaspora is the global community of ethnic Ukrainians, especially those who maintain some kind of connection, even if ephemeral, to the land of their ancestors and maintain their feeling of Ukrainian national identity within their own local community.

Holodomor

Ukrainian faminefaminefamine in Ukraine
During 1932–1933, millions of Ukrainians were starved to death by a Soviet regime which led to a famine, known as the Holodomor.
During the Holodomor, millions of inhabitants of Ukraine, the majority of whom were ethnic Ukrainians, died of starvation in a peacetime catastrophe unprecedented in the history of Ukraine.

Mykhailo Hrushevsky

Mykhailo HrushevskyiMykhaylo HrushevskyHrushevsky
The newly established Ukrainian government, the Central Rada, headed by Mykhailo Hrushevsky, issued four universals, the Fourth of which, dated 22 January 1918, declared the independence and sovereignty of the Ukrainian National Republic (UNR) on 25 January 1918.
Mykhailo Serhiyovych Hrushevsky (Михайло Сергійович Грушевський, Chełm, 29 September 1866 – Kislovodsk, 24 November 1934) was a Ukrainian academician, politician, historian, and statesman, one of the most important figures of the Ukrainian national revival of the early 20th century.

Boykos

BoykoBoikoBoikos
Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
Along with the neighboring Lemkos and Hutsuls, the Boykos are a sub-group of the Rusyns, who are often regarded as a sub-group Ukrainian people and speak a Rusyn language, which is often considered as a dialect of the Ukrainian language.

Lithuanians

LithuanianLithuanian peopleLithuanian diaspora
In comparison to their northern and eastern neighbors, Ukrainians have a similar percentage of Haplogroup R1a-Z280 (43%) in their population—compare Belarusians, Russians, and Lithuanians and (55%, 46%, and 42% respectively).
According to the census conducted in 2001, 83.45% of the population identified themselves as ethnic Lithuanians, 6.74% as Poles, 6.31% as Russians, 1.23% as Belarusians, and 2.27% as members of other ethnic groups such as Ukrainians, Jews, Germans, Tatars, Latvians, Romani, Estonians, Crimean Karaites, Scandinavians etc.

Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
The Ukrainian language appeared in the 14th – 16th centuries (with some prototypical features already evident in the 11th century), but at that time, it was mostly known as Ruthenian, like its brothers.
Although there are almost fifty million ethnic Ukrainians worldwide, including 37.5 million in Ukraine (77.8% of the total population), the Ukrainian language is prevalent only in western and central Ukraine.

Anti-Ukrainian sentiment

anti-UkrainianUkrainophobiaUkrainophobe
Today, one of the consequences of these acts is Ukrainophobia.
Anti-Ukrainian sentiment or Ukrainophobia is animosity towards Ukrainians, Ukrainian culture, language or Ukraine as a nation.