Ukrainians

UkrainianUkraineethnic UkrainiansUkrainian descentethnic UkrainianUkrainian peopleUkrainian-bornRuthenian/UkrainianRutheniansUkrainian nation
Ukrainians (українці, ukrayintsi, ) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the sixth-largest nation in Europe.wikipedia
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Ukraine

🇺🇦UkrainianUKR
Ukrainians (українці, ukrayintsi, ) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the sixth-largest nation in Europe.
demonym = Ukrainian

East Slavs

East SlavicEastern SlavicEast
Ukrainians (українці, ukrayintsi, ) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the sixth-largest nation in Europe.
Formerly the main population of the loose medieval Kievan Rus federation state, by the seventeenth century they evolved into the Belarusian, Russian, Rusyn and Ukrainian people.

Rusyns

RusynCarpatho-RusynCarpatho-Rusyns
The people of Ukraine have historically been known as "Rusyns (Ruthenians)" and "Cossacks", among others. Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
Rusyns descend from Ruthenian peoples, who did not adopt the use of the ethnonym "Ukrainian" in the early 20th century.

Ukrainian language

Ukrainianukrukr.
The Ukrainian language appeared in the 14th – 16th centuries (with some prototypical features already evident in the 11th century), but at that time, it was mostly known as Ruthenian, like its brothers.
It is the official state language of Ukraine and first of two principal languages of Ukrainians; it is one of the three official languages in the unrecognized state of Transnistria, the other two being Romanian and Russian.

Carpathian Ruthenia

TranscarpathiaZakarpattiaCarpathia
The appellation Ukrainians initially came into common usage in Central Ukraine and did not take hold in Galicia and Bukovyna until the latter part of the 19th century, in Transcarpathia until the 1930s, and in the Prešov Region until the late 1940s.
It is an ethnically diverse region, inhabited by Ukrainian, Rusyn, Lemko, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Bulgarian and Russian populations.

Ukrainian Canadians

UkrainianUkrainiansUkrainian-Canadian
Today, large ethnic Ukrainian minorities reside in Russia, Canada, the United States, Brazil, Kazakhstan, Italy and Argentina.
Ukrainian Canadians (Українські канадці, Україноканадці; Canadiens d'origine ukrainienne) are Canadian citizens of Ukrainian descent or Ukrainian-born people who immigrated to Canada.

Ruthenians

RuthenianRusynsRuthenes
From the 14th to the 16th centuries, the Western portions of the European part of what is now known as Russia, the territories of northern Ukraine and Belarus (Western Rus') were largely known as Rus', continuing the tradition of Kievan Rus'. People of these territories were usually called Rus or Rusyns (known as Ruthenians in Western and Central Europe). Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
In its broadest usage, "Ruthenians" or "Ruthenes" referred to peoples which were ancestors of the modern Belarusians, Russians, Rusyns and Ukrainians.

Zaporozhian Sich

Zaporizhian CossacksSichZaporozhian
In the 16th – 17th centuries, with the establishment of the Zaporizhian Sich, the notion of Ukraine as a separate country with a separate ethnic identity came into being.
The Zaporozhian Sich emerged as a method of defence by Slavic colonists against the frequent and devastating raids of Crimean Tatars, who captured and enslaved hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians, Belorusians and Poles in operations called "the harvesting of the steppe".

Cossacks

CossackUkrainian CossacksRussian Cossacks
The people of Ukraine have historically been known as "Rusyns (Ruthenians)" and "Cossacks", among others.
Some historians suggest that the Cossack people were of mixed ethnic origins, descending from Russians, Ukrainians, Belarusians, Turks, Tatars, and others who settled or passed through the vast Steppe.

Green Ukraine

Zeleny KlynFar EastUssuriland
Approximately 800,000 people of Ukrainian ancestry live in the Russian Far East in an area known historically as "Green Ukraine".
After the establishment of the Bolshevik Far Eastern Republic on April 6, 1920, Far Eastern areas with an ethnic Ukrainian majority attempted to secede and establish an entity called Green Ukraine.

Bukovina

BukowinaNorthern BukovinaBukovyna
The appellation Ukrainians initially came into common usage in Central Ukraine and did not take hold in Galicia and Bukovyna until the latter part of the 19th century, in Transcarpathia until the 1930s, and in the Prešov Region until the late 1940s.
Ruthenian is an archaic name for Ukrainian, while the Hutsuls are a regional Ukrainian subgroup.

Tivertsi

TiverciansTiverians
East Slavic tribes cited as "proto-Ukrainian" include the Volhynians, Derevlianians, Polianians, and Siverianians and the less significant Ulychians, Tivertsians, and White Croats.
The Tivertsi were one of the tribes that formed the Moldovan and Ukrainian ethnicities, namely the sub-ethnic and historic region of Podolia.

Russians

Russianethnic RussianRussian people
In comparison to their northern and eastern neighbors, Ukrainians have a similar percentage of Haplogroup R1a-Z280 (43%) in their population—compare Belarusians, Russians, and Lithuanians and (55%, 46%, and 42% respectively).
The Russians share many cultural traits with other East Slavic ethnic groups, specifically Belarusians and Ukrainians.

Ruthenia

RusOld RusRus’
From the 14th to the 16th centuries, the Western portions of the European part of what is now known as Russia, the territories of northern Ukraine and Belarus (Western Rus') were largely known as Rus', continuing the tradition of Kievan Rus'. People of these territories were usually called Rus or Rusyns (known as Ruthenians in Western and Central Europe).
The use of the term Rus/Russia in the lands of ancient Rus' survived longer as a name used by Ukrainians for Ukraine.

Polish census of 2011

2011 census2011 Polish Census2011 Polish national census
The number of Ukrainians in Poland amounted to some 51,000 people in 2011 (according to the Polish Census).

Hutsuls

HutsulHutsul peoplea list of Hutsul people
Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
While they often have been officially designated as a subgroup of Ukrainians, however Hutsuls mostly regard themselves as a part of a broader Rusyn ethnicity, alongside two other groups from the cross-border region of Transcarpathia: the Boykos and Lemkos.

Lemkos

LemkoLemko people Lemko
Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
Their affiliation with other ethnicities is controversial, although individual Lemkos generally self-identity as a sub-group of Rusyns and/or Ukrainians.

Ukrainian diaspora

diasporaEthnic UkrainiansUkrainian descent
But news and information about what was going on reached the West and evoked public responses in Polish-ruled Western Ukraine and in the Ukrainian diaspora.
The Ukrainian diaspora is the global community of ethnic Ukrainians, especially those who maintain some kind of connection, even if ephemeral, to the land of their ancestors and maintain their feeling of Ukrainian national identity within their own local community.

Holodomor

famineGreat Faminefamine in Ukraine
During 1932–1933 millions of Ukrainians were starved to death by a Soviet regime which led to a famine, known as the Holodomor.
During the Holodomor, millions of inhabitants of Ukraine, the majority of whom were ethnic Ukrainians, died of starvation in a peacetime catastrophe unprecedented in the history of Ukraine.

Volhynians

Volhynian CzechsVolyniansvolyniany
East Slavic tribes cited as "proto-Ukrainian" include the Volhynians, Derevlianians, Polianians, and Siverianians and the less significant Ulychians, Tivertsians, and White Croats.
They are one of the groups which went on to form the modern Ukrainian ethnicity.

Lithuanians

Lithuanianethnic LithuaniansLithuania
In comparison to their northern and eastern neighbors, Ukrainians have a similar percentage of Haplogroup R1a-Z280 (43%) in their population—compare Belarusians, Russians, and Lithuanians and (55%, 46%, and 42% respectively).
According to the census conducted in 2001, 83.45% of the population identified themselves as ethnic Lithuanians, 6.74% as Poles, 6.31% as Russians, 1.23% as Belarusians, and 2.27% as members of other ethnic groups such as Ukrainians, Jews, Germans, Tatars, Latvians, Romani, Estonians, Crimean Karaites, Scandinavians etc.

Boykos

BoikosBoykoBoyko people
Among them the most known are Hutsuls, Volhynians, Boykos and Lemkos (otherwise known as Rusyns – a derivative of Ruthenians), each with peculiar area of settlement, dialect, dress, anthropological type and folk traditions.
Along with the neighboring Lemkos and Hutsuls, the Boykos are a sub-group of the Ukrainian people and speak a dialect of the Ukrainian language.

Semyon Timoshenko

Marshal of the Soviet Union Semyon Konstantinovich TimoshenkoMarshal TimoshenkoSemyon Konstantinovich Timoshenko
Despite this, many Ukrainians played prominent roles in the Soviet Union, including such public figures as Semyon Timoshenko.
Timoshenko was born into a peasant family of Ukrainian ethnicity at Furmanivka, in the Budjak region (Southern Bessarabia, present-day Odessa Oblast, Ukraine).

Ukrainian People's Republic

UkraineUNRUkrainian
The ethnonym Ukrainians became widely accepted only in the 20th century after their territory obtained distinctive statehood in 1917.
These two entities, plus the White Movement, Poland, Green armies and the Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine, fought constantly with each other, which resulted in many casualties among Ukrainians fighting in a Ukrainian civil war (1917-1921) as part of the wider Russian Civil War of 1917-1922.

Anti-Ukrainian sentiment

anti-UkrainianUkrainophobiaAnti-Ukraine
Today, one of the consequences of these acts is Ukrainophobia.
Another one is based on the conceptual rejection of Ukrainians, Ukrainian culture, and language as artificial and unnatural; at the turn of the 20th century, several authors supported an assertion that Ukrainian identity and language had been created artificially in order to undermine Russia.