Ulmen (Mapuche)

Chilean Proverb written in Mapuche and Chilean Spanish. The Mapudungun alphabet used here does not reflect an agreed-upon standard. In fact, there are three distinct alphabets currently used to write the Mapuche language.

Mapudungun word meaning "rich man".

- Ulmen (Mapuche)

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Lonko

Chief of several Mapuche communities.

Chilean Proverb written in Mapuche and Chilean Spanish. The Mapudungun alphabet used here does not reflect an agreed-upon standard. In fact, there are three distinct alphabets currently used to write the Mapuche language.

These were often ulmen, the wealthier men in the lof.

Aillarehue

Aillarehue or Ayllarehue (from the Mapudungun: ayllarewe/ayjarewe: "nine rehues"); a confederation of rehues or family-based units (lof) that dominated a region or province.

Chilean Proverb written in Mapuche and Chilean Spanish. The Mapudungun alphabet used here does not reflect an agreed-upon standard. In fact, there are three distinct alphabets currently used to write the Mapuche language.

Each Mapuche lof, levo or caví (lineage) celebrated its religious rituals at a unique rehue or rewe ("altar"), near the home of a local lonko, Ulmen or cacique, often the word rehue was used with the sense of party or clan ("I am from this rehue"), in a way similar to the old form of Christian administrative allegiance to parishes.

Juan de Lebu

Current distribution of the indigenous peoples of the Americas (not including mixed people like mestizos, métis, zambos and pardos)

Juan de Lebú was a Moluche cacique or Ulmen of the Lebu region, captured by the Spanish sometime before 1568.

Indio Rico

Small town in southern Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, located in the district of Coronel Pringles.

The Indian.

While researchers believe the term "rich Indian", is related to ulmen in the Mapuche language: powerful cacique, or rich chief.

Mapuche history

Archaeological culture, the Mapuche people of southern Chile and Argentina have a long history which dates back to 600–500 BC. The Mapuche society underwent great transformations after Spanish contact in the mid–16th century.

Mocha Island off the coast of Arauco Peninsula, Chile
Reconstruction of a dalca in the museum of Dalcahue. This king of boats were used by both Chonos and the Mapuche of Chiloé (Cunco, Huilliche, Veliche). More northern Mapuche used simpler watercraft called wampu.
Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala's picture of the confrontation between the Mapuche (left) and the Inca Empire (right)
Mapuche graveyard
The llolle pictured is a traditional Mapuche fish trap.
Toki Lautaro, an early Mapuche military leader. Painting by Pedro Subercaseaux.
Settlements of the Conquistadores before the Destruction of the Seven Cities
Mapuches during a malón raid
Cornelio Saavedra Rodríguez in meeting with the main lonkos of Araucania in 1869
Vintage engraving of Mapuche
Composite of Mapuche activists killed in confrontations with the Chilean police in the 2000s

The secular were the reche, ülmen and gentyoke.