Ulrich IV, Count of Pfannberg

Ulrich IV
Ulrich IV of Pfannberg (c. 1260 – before 1318) was Count of Pfannberg from 1287 until his death.wikipedia
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Ulrich V, Count of Pfannberg

Ulrich V of PfannbergUlrich VUlrich V. of Pfannberg
He was the son of Count Ulrich IV and Margaret of Heunburg.

Saint Paul's Abbey, Lavanttal

St. Paul's Abbey in the LavanttalSaint Paul's AbbeySt. Paul's Abbey
He was first mentioned by name in 1278, together with his older brother Herman, in a document archived at St. Paul's Abbey in the Lavanttal. On 30 May 1292 at Greiffen, his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunberg, sold a manor named Rain in Rakkonik (this was most likely the manor now known as Rainhof in Raggane, north-east of Sankt Paul im Lavanttal) to abbot Conrad of the St. Paul's Abbey and promised he would plead with Ulrich IV to allow this sale, as Ulrich IV was still liege lord of this and many other possessions east of the river Lavant, for example Puhelarn manor in Unterpichling (which was later acquired by St. Paul's Abbey) and Dachberg, Mühldorf, Lindhof, Götzendorf and Hundsdorf, as well as the castles at Rabenstein, Loschental and Lavamünd.

Dravograd

UnterdrauburgDravograd Hydroelectric Power Plant
After Herman died in 1287, Ulrich inherited his possessions, except Traberg (Unterdrauburg and Dravograd), which remained in the hands of Herman's widow Elisabeth, née Countess of Heunburg, because Ulrich was in a tight financial situation and could not afford to pay her a pension.

Dowry

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On the Sunday before Ascension Day he confirmed at Bleiburg that his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunburg, had paid Margaret's dowry of 1000 silver marks and that he and Margaret would renounce any claims on the inheritance of his in-laws.

Chronicle

chroniclerchroniclersverse chronicle
By contrast, the chroniclers hardly mention Ulrich IV.

Albert I of Germany

Albert IAlbert I of HabsburgAlbert of Habsburg
Ottokar aus der Gaal mentions in his Styrian rhyming chronicle that Ulrich IV participated in the rebellion against Duke Albert of Austria in late 1291 and early 1292 and had been a member of the delegation sent to Archbishop Conrad of Salzburg to persuade him to join the rebellion.

Prince-Archbishopric of Salzburg

Archbishop of SalzburgArchbishopric of SalzburgSalzburg
Ottokar aus der Gaal mentions in his Styrian rhyming chronicle that Ulrich IV participated in the rebellion against Duke Albert of Austria in late 1291 and early 1292 and had been a member of the delegation sent to Archbishop Conrad of Salzburg to persuade him to join the rebellion.

Duchy of Styria

StyriaStyrianDuke of Styria
Later that year a rebellion broke out in Styria, because Duke Albert refused to confirm the privileges of the Estates.

Bruck an der Mur

BruckBruck a. d. MurBruck/Mur
The rebellion collapsed in March 1292, after Albert captured Bruck an der Mur and took the rebel leader Frederick of Stubenberg prisoner.

Stubenberg family

StubenbergStubenberg noble familyHouse of Stubenberg
The rebellion collapsed in March 1292, after Albert captured Bruck an der Mur and took the rebel leader Frederick of Stubenberg prisoner.

Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia

Meinhard IIMeinhard II of Gorizia-TyrolMeinhard II of Tyrol
Ulrich IV did not participate in the rebellion against Duke Meinhard II of Carinthia in late 1292 and early 1293.

Rein Abbey, Austria

Rein AbbeyReinCistercian Abbey Basilica, Rein Abbey
In 1292, donations by the Counts of Pfannberg to Rein Abbey were recorded.

Sankt Paul im Lavanttal

Saint PaulSankt PaulSt. Paul
On 30 May 1292 at Greiffen, his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunberg, sold a manor named Rain in Rakkonik (this was most likely the manor now known as Rainhof in Raggane, north-east of Sankt Paul im Lavanttal) to abbot Conrad of the St. Paul's Abbey and promised he would plead with Ulrich IV to allow this sale, as Ulrich IV was still liege lord of this and many other possessions east of the river Lavant, for example Puhelarn manor in Unterpichling (which was later acquired by St. Paul's Abbey) and Dachberg, Mühldorf, Lindhof, Götzendorf and Hundsdorf, as well as the castles at Rabenstein, Loschental and Lavamünd.

Abbot

abbotsArchabbotabbacy
On 30 May 1292 at Greiffen, his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunberg, sold a manor named Rain in Rakkonik (this was most likely the manor now known as Rainhof in Raggane, north-east of Sankt Paul im Lavanttal) to abbot Conrad of the St. Paul's Abbey and promised he would plead with Ulrich IV to allow this sale, as Ulrich IV was still liege lord of this and many other possessions east of the river Lavant, for example Puhelarn manor in Unterpichling (which was later acquired by St. Paul's Abbey) and Dachberg, Mühldorf, Lindhof, Götzendorf and Hundsdorf, as well as the castles at Rabenstein, Loschental and Lavamünd.

Lavant (river)

LavantLavant RiverLavanttal
On 30 May 1292 at Greiffen, his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunberg, sold a manor named Rain in Rakkonik (this was most likely the manor now known as Rainhof in Raggane, north-east of Sankt Paul im Lavanttal) to abbot Conrad of the St. Paul's Abbey and promised he would plead with Ulrich IV to allow this sale, as Ulrich IV was still liege lord of this and many other possessions east of the river Lavant, for example Puhelarn manor in Unterpichling (which was later acquired by St. Paul's Abbey) and Dachberg, Mühldorf, Lindhof, Götzendorf and Hundsdorf, as well as the castles at Rabenstein, Loschental and Lavamünd.

Rabenstein Castle (Carinthia)

Burgruine RabensteinRabensteinRabenstein Castle
On 30 May 1292 at Greiffen, his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunberg, sold a manor named Rain in Rakkonik (this was most likely the manor now known as Rainhof in Raggane, north-east of Sankt Paul im Lavanttal) to abbot Conrad of the St. Paul's Abbey and promised he would plead with Ulrich IV to allow this sale, as Ulrich IV was still liege lord of this and many other possessions east of the river Lavant, for example Puhelarn manor in Unterpichling (which was later acquired by St. Paul's Abbey) and Dachberg, Mühldorf, Lindhof, Götzendorf and Hundsdorf, as well as the castles at Rabenstein, Loschental and Lavamünd.

Lavamünd

Lavamund, Austria
On 30 May 1292 at Greiffen, his father-in-law, Count Ulrich II of Heunberg, sold a manor named Rain in Rakkonik (this was most likely the manor now known as Rainhof in Raggane, north-east of Sankt Paul im Lavanttal) to abbot Conrad of the St. Paul's Abbey and promised he would plead with Ulrich IV to allow this sale, as Ulrich IV was still liege lord of this and many other possessions east of the river Lavant, for example Puhelarn manor in Unterpichling (which was later acquired by St. Paul's Abbey) and Dachberg, Mühldorf, Lindhof, Götzendorf and Hundsdorf, as well as the castles at Rabenstein, Loschental and Lavamünd.

Wiener Neustadt

Wiener-NeustadtNeustadtWiener Neustadt, Austria
Life became even more difficult when in 1293 Duke Albert took his parents-in-law prisoner and banished them to Wiener Neustadt.

Sankt Peter-Freienstein

On 5 July 1294 at Judenburg castle, Ulrich IV and his wife Margaret pledged their princely fief, the castle at Sankt Peter-Freienstein, two large manors in Tolling and Welen, and justice over the area from Hohenward and Chieneinöde to the river Kalten Rinne at Röthelstein to Abbot Henry of Admont.

Röthelstein

a municipality of the same name
On 5 July 1294 at Judenburg castle, Ulrich IV and his wife Margaret pledged their princely fief, the castle at Sankt Peter-Freienstein, two large manors in Tolling and Welen, and justice over the area from Hohenward and Chieneinöde to the river Kalten Rinne at Röthelstein to Abbot Henry of Admont.