Ultra high frequency

UHFUHF bandultra-high frequencyUHF radioUltra high freq.ultra high frequenciesVHF330 MHz is most likelyAnalog UHFanalog UHF signal
Ultra high frequency (UHF) is the ITU designation for radio frequencies in the range between 300 megahertz (MHz) and 3 gigahertz (GHz), also known as the decimetre band as the wavelengths range from one meter to one tenth of a meter (one decimeter).wikipedia
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Microwave

microwavesmicrowave radiationmicrowave tube
Radio waves with frequencies above the UHF band fall into the super-high frequency (SHF) or microwave frequency range.
Different sources define different frequency ranges as microwaves; the above broad definition includes both UHF and EHF (millimeter wave) bands.

UHF television broadcasting

UHFUHF islandUHF television
They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, and numerous other applications.
UHF television broadcasting is the use of ultra high frequency (UHF) radio for over-the-air transmission of television signals.

Bluetooth

Bluetooth 4.0Bluetooth 5.0Bluetooth 2.0
They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, and numerous other applications.
Bluetooth is a wireless technology standard used for exchanging data between fixed and mobile devices over short distances using short-wavelength UHF radio waves in the industrial, scientific and medical radio bands, from 2.400 to 2.485GHz, and building personal area networks (PANs).

Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwireless
They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, and numerous other applications.
Wi-Fi most commonly uses the 2.4 GHz UHF and 5 GHz SHF ISM radio bands; these bands are subdivided into multiple channels.

Personal radio service

They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, and numerous other applications.
Specific details vary between the different national services, but many personal radio services operate in the VHF or UHF part of the radio spectrum, using frequency modulation and a maximum power of only a few watts.

S band

S-bandSS-
Two other IEEE radar bands overlap the ITU UHF band: the L band between 1 and 2 GHz and the S band between 2 and 4 GHz.
Thus it crosses the conventional boundary between the UHF and SHF bands at 3.0 GHz.

Tropospheric propagation

tropospheric ductingtroposphericducting
Occasionally when conditions are right, UHF radio waves can travel long distances by tropospheric ducting as the atmosphere warms and cools throughout the day.
In certain favourable locations, enhanced tropospheric propagation may enable reception of ultra high frequency (UHF) TV signals up to 1,000 mi or more.

Yagi–Uda antenna

Yagi antennaYagi-Uda antennaYagi
[[File:UHF TV Antenna 001.JPG|thumb|UHF television antenna on a residence. This type of antenna, called a Yagi-Uda antenna, is widely used at UHF frequencies. High gain antennas for point-to-point communication links and UHF television reception are usually Yagi, log periodic, corner reflectors, or reflective array antennas.
Also called a "beam antenna", or "parasitic array", the Yagi is very widely used as a high-gain antenna on the HF, VHF and UHF bands.

Radio spectrum

bandradio bandspectrum
The IEEE defines the UHF radar band as frequencies between 300 MHz and 1 GHz.
Other bands are national or regional allocations only due to differing allocations for other services, especially in the VHF and UHF parts of the radio spectrum.

Radio frequency

RFradio frequenciesradio-frequency
Ultra high frequency (UHF) is the ITU designation for radio frequencies in the range between 300 megahertz (MHz) and 3 gigahertz (GHz), also known as the decimetre band as the wavelengths range from one meter to one tenth of a meter (one decimeter).

Whip antenna

ground plane antennaWhipwhip-style
Omnidirectional UHF antennas used on mobile devices are usually short whips, sleeve dipoles, rubber ducky antennas or the planar inverted F antenna (PIFA) used in cellphones.
Whips are the most common type of monopole antenna, and are used in the higher frequency HF, VHF and UHF radio bands.

Parabolic antenna

dish antennaparabolicparabolic dish antenna
At the top end of the band slot antennas and parabolic dishes become practical.
In order to achieve narrow beamwidths, the parabolic reflector must be much larger than the wavelength of the radio waves used, so parabolic antennas are used in the high frequency part of the radio spectrum, at UHF and microwave (SHF) frequencies, at which the wavelengths are small enough that conveniently-sized reflectors can be used.

Corner reflector antenna

Corner reflectorcorner reflectors
High gain antennas for point-to-point communication links and UHF television reception are usually Yagi, log periodic, corner reflectors, or reflective array antennas.
A corner reflector antenna is a type of directional antenna used at VHF and UHF frequencies.

PMR446

PMRPMR 446PMR radio
Examples of personal radio services are GMRS, PMR446, and UHF CB.
PMR446 (Private Mobile Radio, 446 MHz) is a licence exempt service in the UHF radio frequency band and is available for business and personal use in most countries throughout the European Union.

General Mobile Radio Service

GMRS
Examples of personal radio services are GMRS, PMR446, and UHF CB.
The General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a land-mobile FM UHF radio service designed for short-distance two-way communication.

Skywave

ionospheric reflectionsky waveionospheric propagation
Radio waves in the UHF band travel almost entirely by line-of-sight propagation (LOS) and ground reflection; unlike in the HF band there is little to no reflection from the ionosphere (skywave propagation), or ground wave.
E-skip rarely affects UHF frequencies, except for very rare occurrences below 500 MHz.

Walkie-talkie

walkie talkiewalkie-talkiesradio
They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, and numerous other applications.
Most personal walkie-talkies sold are designed to operate in UHF allocations, and are designed to be very compact, with buttons for changing channels and other settings on the face of the radio and a short, fixed antenna.

Reflective array antenna

Billboard antennaReflective arrayreflectarray
High gain antennas for point-to-point communication links and UHF television reception are usually Yagi, log periodic, corner reflectors, or reflective array antennas.
They are often used in the VHF and UHF frequency bands.

Antenna (radio)

antennaantennasradio antenna
The length of an antenna is related to the length of the radio waves used.
Since wavelengths are so small at higher frequencies (UHF, microwaves) trading off performance to obtain a smaller physical size is usually not required.

70-centimeter band

70 cm70 centimeters70 centimeter
The 70-centimeter or 440 MHz band is a portion of the UHF radio spectrum internationally allocated to amateur radio and amateur satellite use.

13-centimeter band

13 cm13 centimeters13 centimetres
The 13 centimeter, 2.3 GHz or 2.4 GHz band is a portion of the UHF (microwave) radio spectrum internationally allocated to amateur radio and amateur satellite use on a secondary basis.

Log-periodic antenna

log periodic antennalog-periodicLog-periodic dipole array
High gain antennas for point-to-point communication links and UHF television reception are usually Yagi, log periodic, corner reflectors, or reflective array antennas.
One large application for LPDAs is in rooftop terrestrial television antennas, since they must have large bandwidth to cover the wide television bands of roughly 54–88 and 174–216 MHz in the VHF and 470–890 MHz in the UHF while also having high gain for adequate fringe reception.

UHF CB

CB
Examples of personal radio services are GMRS, PMR446, and UHF CB.
UHF CB is a class-licensed citizen's band radio service authorised by the governments of Australia, New Zealand, Vanuatu, and Malaysia in the UHF 477 MHz band.

23-centimeter band

23 cm23 centimeters23 cm band
The 23 centimeter, 1200 MHz or 1.2 GHz band is a portion of the UHF (microwave) radio spectrum internationally allocated to amateur radio and amateur satellite use on a secondary basis.

All-Channel Receiver Act

All Channels Actall-channel tuning1961
Since 1962, UHF channel tuners (at the time, channels 14-83) have been required in television receivers by the All-Channel Receiver Act.
The All-Channel Receiver Act of 1962 (ACRA), commonly known as the All-Channels Act, was passed by the United States Congress in 1961, to allow the Federal Communications Commission to require that all television set manufacturers must include UHF tuners, so that new UHF-band TV stations (then channels 14 to 83) could be received by the public.