Umbilical vein

umbilicalumbilical veins[umbilical] veinsveinveins
The umbilical vein is a vein present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta into the growing fetus.wikipedia
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Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
The umbilical vein is a vein present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta into the growing fetus.
Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart.

Placenta

placental barrierchorioallantoic placentaafterbirth
The umbilical vein is a vein present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta into the growing fetus.
It connects to the fetus by an umbilical cord of approximately 55–60 cm (22–24 inch) in length, which contains two umbilical arteries and one umbilical vein.

Ductus venosus

Patent ductus venosus
More than two-thirds of fetal hepatic circulation is via the main portal vein, while the remainder is shunted from the left portal vein via the ductus venosus to the inferior vena cava, eventually being delivered to the fetal right atrium.
In the fetus, the ductus venosus (Arantius' duct after Julius Caesar Aranzi ) shunts a portion of umbilical vein blood flow directly to the inferior vena cava.

Chorionic villi

chorionic villusvilliChorionic tissue
The unpaired umbilical vein carries oxygen and nutrient rich blood derived from fetal-maternal blood exchange at the chorionic villi.
After circulating through the capillaries of the villi, blood returns to the embryo through the umbilical vein.

Fetus

fetalfoetusfetuses
The umbilical vein is a vein present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta into the growing fetus.
Blood from the placenta is carried to the fetus by the umbilical vein.

Liver

hepaticliver protein synthesislivers
In portal hypertension, the vessels surrounding the liver are subjected to abnormally high blood pressure—so high, in fact, that the force of the blood pressing against the round ligament is sufficient to recanalize the structure.
The left umbilical vein becomes the ductus venosus and the right vitelline vein becomes the portal vein.

Falciform ligament

falciform ligament of the liverfalciform
It extends from the umbilicus to the transverse fissure, where it joins with the falciform ligament of the liver to separate segment 4 from segments 2 and 3 of the left hepatic lobe.
The umbilical vein of the fetus gives rise to the round ligament of liver in the adult, which is found in the free border of the falciform ligament.

Fetal circulation

antenatal circulationBlood flowembryonic artery
Blood from the placenta is carried to the fetus by the umbilical vein.

Round ligament of liver

round ligament of the liverligamentum teres hepatisligamentum teres
Within a week of birth, the neonate's umbilical vein is completely obliterated and is replaced by a fibrous cord called the round ligament of the liver (also called ligamentum teres hepatis).

Umbilical artery

umbilical arteriesarteria umbilicalisfetal hypogastric artery
Closure of the umbilical vein usually occurs after the umbilical arteries have closed.
There are usually two umbilical arteries present together with one umbilical vein in the umbilical cord.

Blood

human bloodhematologicaloxygen consumption
The umbilical vein is a vein present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta into the growing fetus.

Autotransfusion

autologousCell salvage and autotransfusioncement
This prolongs the communication between the placenta and fetal heart, allowing for a sort of autotransfusion of remaining blood from the placenta to the fetus.

Lobe (anatomy)

lobeslobelobules
It extends from the umbilicus to the transverse fissure, where it joins with the falciform ligament of the liver to separate segment 4 from segments 2 and 3 of the left hepatic lobe.

Blood pressure

systolic blood pressurediastolic blood pressurearterial blood pressure
Under extreme pressure, the round ligament may reopen to allow the passage of blood.

Cirrhosis

cirrhosis of the liverliver cirrhosisliver fibrosis
Such recanalization may be evident in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

Portal hypertension

high blood pressure in the portal systemincreased pressures in the portal vein circulationliver condition
Such recanalization may be evident in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

Scar

scarringscar tissuescars
Patients with cirrhosis experience rapid growth of scar tissue in and around the liver, often functionally obstructing nearby vessels.

Caput medusae

Caput medusavery visible veins
This leads to a condition called Caput medusae.

Hemolytic disease of the newborn

erythroblastosis fetalishemolytic disease of the fetus and newbornRh incompatibility
It may be used as a site for regular transfusion in cases of erythroblastosis or hemolytic disease.

Hemolytic anemia

haemolytic anaemiahemolytic anaemiahemolytic disease
It may be used as a site for regular transfusion in cases of erythroblastosis or hemolytic disease.

Heart