United Artists

UAUnited Artists Media GroupUnited Artists PicturesLes Productions Artistes AssociésUnited Artists ClassicsUnited Artists CorporationUnited Artists BroadcastingUnited Artists Corp.United Artists EuropaUnited Artists Records
United Artists Corporation (UA), currently doing business as United Artists Digital Studios, is an American film and television entertainment studio.wikipedia
3,407 Related Articles

Charlie Chaplin

ChaplinCharles ChaplinChaplinesque
Founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks, the studio was premised on allowing actors to control their own interests, rather than being dependent upon commercial studios.
In 1919, Chaplin co-founded the distribution company United Artists which gave him complete control over his films.

Mary Pickford

Mary Mary Pickford FoundationMary Pickford Award
Founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks, the studio was premised on allowing actors to control their own interests, rather than being dependent upon commercial studios.
With a career spanning 50 years, she was a co-founder of both the Pickford-Fairbanks Studio (along with Douglas Fairbanks) and, later, the United Artists film studio (with Fairbanks, Charlie Chaplin and D. W. Griffith), and one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences who present the yearly "Oscar" award ceremony.

Douglas Fairbanks

Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.FairbanksDouglas Fairbanks Senior
Founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks, the studio was premised on allowing actors to control their own interests, rather than being dependent upon commercial studios.
Fairbanks was a founding member of United Artists.

Hiram Abrams

Hiram Abrams was its first managing director, and the company established its headquarters at 729 Seventh Avenue in New York City.
He was also the first managing director of United Artists.

20th Century Fox

20th Century-FoxFoxFox Film Corporation
He set up 20th Century Pictures' merger with Fox Film Corporation to form 20th Century Fox.
Twentieth Century Pictures' Joseph Schenck and Darryl F. Zanuck left United Artists over a stock dispute, and began merger talks with the management of financially struggling Fox Film, under President Sidney Kent.

Studio system

Golden AgeHollywood's Golden Agestudio era
They were spurred on by established Hollywood producers and distributors who were tightening their control over actor salaries and creative decisions, a process that evolved into the studio system.
The eighth of the Golden Age majors, United Artists, owned a few theaters and had access to two production facilities owned by members of its controlling partnership group, but it functioned primarily as a backer-distributor, loaning money to independent producers and releasing their films.

Darryl F. Zanuck

Darryl ZanuckZanuckDaryl F. Zanuck
In 1933, Schenck organized a new company with Darryl F. Zanuck, called Twentieth Century Pictures, which soon provided four pictures a year, forming half of UA's schedule.
20th Century released its material through United Artists.

Samuel Goldwyn Productions

Samuel GoldwynSamuel Goldwyn Prod.Goldwyn
Samuel Goldwyn Productions and Disney went to RKO and Wanger to Universal Pictures.
As of 2012, the distribution rights of Samuel Goldwyn films from the library were transferred to Warner Bros., with Miramax managing global licensing, with the exception of The Hurricane, which is now back with its original distributor, United Artists.

MGM Television

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer TelevisionMGM/UA TelevisionMGM
However, on December 14 of the following year, MGM wholly acquired UAMG and folded it into MGM Television.
Due to mounting financial difficulties and decreased output, MGM closed its distribution offices in October 1973 and outsourced distribution for its film library for a ten year period along with selling its music publishing arm to United Artists.

Walt Disney Animation Studios

Walt Disney ProductionsDisneyWalt Disney Feature Animation
Other independent producers distributed through United Artists in the 1930s including Walt Disney Productions, Alexander Korda, Hal Roach, David O. Selznick, and Walter Wanger.
Columbia distributed Disney's shorts for two years before the Disney studio entered a new distribution deal with United Artists in 1932.

Twentieth Century Pictures

20th Century Pictures20th Century20th Century Pictures, Inc.
He set up 20th Century Pictures' merger with Fox Film Corporation to form 20th Century Fox. In 1933, Schenck organized a new company with Darryl F. Zanuck, called Twentieth Century Pictures, which soon provided four pictures a year, forming half of UA's schedule.
Twentieth Century Pictures was an independent Hollywood motion picture production company created in 1933 by Joseph Schenck (the former president of United Artists) and Darryl F. Zanuck from Warner Bros. Financial backing came from Schenck's younger brother Nicholas Schenck, president of Loew's, the theater chain that owned Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), and from Louis B. Mayer of MGM, who wanted a position for his son-in-law, William Goetz.

The Walt Disney Company

DisneyWalt DisneyWalt Disney Productions
Samuel Goldwyn Productions and Disney went to RKO and Wanger to Universal Pictures.
Disney released cartoons through Powers' Celebrity Pictures (1928–1930), Columbia Pictures (1930–1932), and United Artists (1932–1937).

Buster Keaton

KeatonBuster Keaton ProductionsKeaton (Buster)
He had produced pictures for a decade, and brought commitments for films starring his wife, Norma Talmadge, his sister-in-law, Constance Talmadge, and his brother-in-law, Buster Keaton.
His distributor, United Artists, insisted on a production manager who monitored expenses and interfered with certain story elements.

Columbia Pictures

ColumbiaColumbia Pictures CorporationColumbia TriStar
SIMPP fought to end ostensibly anti-competitive practices by the seven major film studios—Loew's (MGM), Columbia Pictures, Paramount Pictures, Universal Pictures, RKO Radio Pictures, 20th Century Fox, and Warner Bros./First National—that controlled the production, distribution, and exhibition of motion pictures.
Columbia gradually moved into the production of higher-budget fare, eventually joining the second tier of Hollywood studios along with United Artists and Universal.

His Majesty, the American

UA's first film, His Majesty, the American, written by and starring Fairbanks, was a success.
It was the first film released by United Artists.

United Artists Records

United ArtistsUAAscot
In 1957, UA created United Artists Records Corporation and United Artists Music Corporation after an unsuccessful attempt to buy a record company.
United Artists Records was a record label founded by Max E. Youngstein of United Artists in 1957 to issue movie soundtracks.

Moulin Rouge (1952 film)

Moulin Rouge19521952 movie
Among their first clients were Sam Spiegel and John Huston, whose Horizon Productions gave UA one major hit, The African Queen (1951) and a substantial success, Moulin Rouge (1952).
Moulin Rouge is a 1952 British drama film directed by John Huston, produced by John and James Woolf for their Romulus Films company and released by United Artists.

William S. Hart

William HartBill Hartmansion
The idea for the venture originated with Fairbanks, Chaplin, Pickford and cowboy star William S. Hart a year earlier.
He produced Tumbleweeds (1925) with his own money, arranging to release it independently through United Artists.

Joseph M. Schenck

Joseph SchenckJoe SchenckFeature Productions
Veteran producer Joseph Schenck was hired as president.
Within a few years Schenck was made the second president of the new United Artists.

Ziv Television Programs

ZivZiv TelevisionZiv Production
In 1960, UA purchased Ziv Television Programs.
In 1960, the company was purchased by United Artists and merged with their television unit to become Ziv-United Artists, but two years later, the name changed back to United Artists Television after the studio phased out Ziv Television Programs' operations.

D. W. Griffith

D.W. GriffithGriffithD.W. Grifter
Founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks, the studio was premised on allowing actors to control their own interests, rather than being dependent upon commercial studios.
At the same time, he founded United Artists together with Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks.

Hecht-Hill-Lancaster

Hecht LancasterHecht-Hill-Lancaster ProductionNorma Productions
Others followed, among them Stanley Kramer, Otto Preminger, Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions, and actors newly freed from studio contracts and seeking to produce or direct their own films.
In 1956 they renewed their deal with United Artists.

Hal Roach

Hal Roach StudiosRoach[Hal] Roach
Other independent producers distributed through United Artists in the 1930s including Walt Disney Productions, Alexander Korda, Hal Roach, David O. Selznick, and Walter Wanger.
In May 1938, Roach ended his distribution contract with MGM, selling them the production rights to, and actors' contracts for Our Gang in the process, and signed with United Artists.

David O. Selznick

SelznickDavid SelznickDavid
Other independent producers distributed through United Artists in the 1930s including Walt Disney Productions, Alexander Korda, Hal Roach, David O. Selznick, and Walter Wanger.
In 1935 he realized that goal by leasing RKO Culver City Studios & back lot, formed Selznick International Pictures, and distributed his films through United Artists.

United Artists Television

UAZiv-United ArtistsUnited Artists Media Group
UA's television division was responsible for shows such as Gilligan's Island, The Fugitive, Outer Limits, and The Patty Duke Show.
United Artists Television (UATV) was an American television production/distribution studio of United Artists Corporation that was formed on New Year's Day (January 1), 1958.