United Kingdom labour law

labour lawEmployment lawUK labour lawlabourUK labourBritish labour lawCommon law duties of an employer to its servants and agentsemploymentemployment relationshiplabour relations
United Kingdom labour law regulates the relations between workers, employers and trade unions.wikipedia
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Taff Vale Rly Co v Amalgamated Society of Rly Servants

Taff Vale CaseTaff ValeTaff Vale decision
At the turn of the 20th century he notorious judgment of Taff Vale Railway Co v Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, made unions liable in economic tort for the costs of industrial action.
Taff Vale Railway Co v Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants [1901] UKHL 1, commonly known as the Taff Vale case, is a formative case in UK labour law.

Unfair dismissal in the United Kingdom

unfair dismissalfair dismissal
An "employee" has all those rights, and also the right to a written contract of employment, time off for pregnancy or child care, reasonable notice before a fair dismissal and a redundancy payment, and the duty to contribute to the National Insurance fund and pay income tax.
Unfair dismissal in the United Kingdom is the part of UK labour law that requires fair, just and reasonable treatment by employers in cases where a person's job could be terminated.

Factory Acts

factory reformFactory ActFactories Act 1844
The Factory Acts dating from 1803 required minimum standards on hours and conditions of working children.
The Factory Acts were a series of UK labour law Acts passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom to regulate the conditions of industrial employment.

Autoclenz Ltd v Belcher

However, the leading case, Autoclenz Ltd v Belcher decided by a unanimous Supreme Court in 2011, adopted the view that mutuality of obligation is the consideration of work for a wage, brought the definition of an employment contract in line with that in used in the EU. Confirming that employment contracts are one of a specific type, and separate from commercial agreements, Lord Clarke held that an exchange of work for a wage was essential.
Autoclenz Ltd v Belcher [2011] UKSC 41 is a landmark UK labour law and English contract law case decided by the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, concerning the scope of statutory protection of rights for working individuals.

Trade Union Act 1871

Trade Union ActTrade Union Act of 1871Trade Union Bill
But then the position was slowly liberalised and through the Trade Union Act 1871 and the Conspiracy, and Protection of Property Act 1875 trade unions were legitimised.
This was one of the founding pieces of legislation in UK labour law, though it has today been superseded by the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992.

Gisda Cyf v Barratt

However, in Gisda Cyf v Barratt, Lord Kerr emphasised that if it affects statutory rights, the process of construction is one that must be "intellectually segregated" from the general law of contract, because of the relation of dependency an employee has.
Gisda Cyf v Barratt [2010] UKSC 41 is a UK labour law case, concerning unfair dismissal governed by the Employment Rights Act 1996.

Employment Rights Act 1996

workers’ employment rights
The Employment Rights Act 1996 gives the right to leave for child care, and the right to request flexible working patterns. Going beyond the minimum in the Pregnant Workers Directive, the ERA 1996 section 71 to 73 and the Maternity and Parental Leave, etc Regulations 1999 guarantee maternity leave for 52 weeks in total, but in four steps, paid and unpaid.
The Employment Rights Act 1996 ( c 18) is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament passed by the Conservative government to codify existing law on individual rights in UK labour law.

Mutual trust and confidence

English courts view an employment contract as involving a relation of mutual trust and confidence, which allows them to develop and enlarge the remedies available for workers and employers alike when one side acts out of bad faith.
Mutual trust and confidence is a phrase used in English law, particularly with reference to contracts in UK labour law, to refer to the obligations owed in an employment relationship between the employer and the worker.

Employment Relations Act 1999

The Employment Relations Act 1999 introduced a 60-page procedure requiring employers to compulsorily recognise and bargain with a union holding support among workers, though union membership remained at a level steadily declining below 30 per cent.
It made significant amendments in UK labour law to the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992.

Trade Boards Act 1909

Trade Boards ActTrade BoardsTrade Boards Bill
The Trade Boards Act 1909 created industrial panels to fix minimum wages and the National Insurance Act 1911 levied a fee to insure people got benefits in the event of unemployment.
UK labour law

Wilsons & Clyde Coal Co Ltd v English

The House of Lords changed this in Wilsons & Clyde Coal Co Ltd v English, holding an employer had a non-delegable duty of care for all employees.
Wilsons and Clyde Coal Ltd v English [1937] UKHL 2 is a UK labour law case concerning the employer's duty to provide a safe system of work for all its employees.

Walton v Independent Living Organisation

In Walton v Independent Living Organisation Ltd a worker who cared for a young epileptic lady had to be on call 24 hours a day, 3 days a week, but could do her own activities outside tasks such as going shopping, making meals and cleaning.
Walton v Independent Living Organisation [2003] EWCA Civ 199 is a UK labour law case regarding the National Minimum Wage Act 1998.

United Kingdom insolvency law

insolvency lawinsolventinsolvency
Because pension schemes save up significant amounts of money, which many people rely on in retirement, protection against an employer's insolvency, or dishonesty, or risks from the stock market were seen as necessary after the 1992 Robert Maxwell scandal.
Numerous other Acts, statutory instruments and cases relating to labour, banking, property and conflicts of laws also shape the subject.

English contract law

contractcontract lawcontracts
However, in Gisda Cyf v Barratt, Lord Kerr emphasised that if it affects statutory rights, the process of construction is one that must be "intellectually segregated" from the general law of contract, because of the relation of dependency an employee has.
Collective bargaining by trade unions and a growing number of employment rights carried the employment contract into an autonomous field of labour law where workers had rights, like a minimum wage, fairness in dismissal, the right to join a union and take collective action, and these could not be given up in a contract with an employer.

Edmonds v Lawson

One curious exclusion, however, is a pupil barrister who in Edmonds v Lawson was held to not be "working" but be "conscientious in receiving instruction".
Edmonds v Lawson [2000] EWCA Civ 69 is a UK labour law case regarding the National Minimum Wage Act 1998 and who is/is not included; it also considered whether a pupil barrister provides consideration to his/her master and/or chambers and whether that relationship demonstrated adequate intention.

Maternity and Parental Leave, etc Regulations 1999

Going beyond the minimum in the Pregnant Workers Directive, the ERA 1996 section 71 to 73 and the Maternity and Parental Leave, etc Regulations 1999 guarantee maternity leave for 52 weeks in total, but in four steps, paid and unpaid.
The Maternity and Parental Leave, etc Regulations 1999 ( SI 1999/3312) is a statutory instrument, concerning UK labour law, which details the rights to maternity and parental leave for employees in the United Kingdom.

Jobholder

Traditionally, these came from a collective agreement, or from an employer setting one up. The Pensions Act 2008 gives every "jobholder" (defined as a worker, age 16 to 75, with wages between £5,035 and £33,540 ) the right to be automatically enrolled by the employer in an occupational pension, unless the jobholder chooses to opt out.
A jobholder is a new type of employment status in UK labour law, that was introduced by the Pensions Act 2008, sections 1 and 88. Jobholders are entitled under the Act to be automatically enrolled in an occupational pension.

Paternity and Adoption Leave Regulations 2002

The Paternity and Adoption Leave Regulations 2002 entitle a father to 2 weeks leave, at the statutory rate of pay.
The Paternity and Adoption Leave Regulations 2002 ( SI 2002/2788) are a statutory instrument concerning UK labour law.

ICI Ltd v Shatwell

Only if an employee callously ignores clear directions of the employer will he be taken to have voluntarily assumed the risk, like in ICI Ltd v Shatwell where an experience quarry shotfirer said he "could not be bothered" to wait 10 minutes before setting of a detonation, and blew up his brother.
ICI Ltd v Shatwell [1965] AC 656 is a UK labour law case concerning

Additional Paternity Leave Regulations 2010

To redress the imbalance between women and men bearing children, the Additional Paternity Leave Regulations 2010 made it possible for the woman to transfer up to 26 weeks of her maternity leave entitlements to her partner.
The Additional Paternity Leave Regulations 2010 ( SI 2010/1055) are a statutory instrument involving UK labour law, which introduced a basic right for mothers to transfer their right to unpaid leave to their partner if the mother has returned to work.

Copland v United Kingdom

Copland v United Kingdom [2007] ECHR 253, monitoring the calls and internet usage of an employee was a violation of the employee's right to private life and correspondence under ECHR article 8. A manager, after spying on the employee's telephone calls and internet use, subsequently insinuated and gossiped that the employee was in a personal affair with another employee.
Copland v United Kingdom [2007] ECHR 253 is a UK labour law case and English contract law case, concerning health care in the UK.

Qua v John Ford Morrison Solicitors

In Qua v John Ford Morrison Solicitors Cox J emphasised that there is no requirement to deliver daily updates.
Qua v John Ford Morrison Solicitors [2003] ICR 482 ( EAT) is a UK labour law case concerning emergency leave to care for children.

National Minimum Wage Act 1998

national minimum wageminimum wageUnited Kingdom in 1998
This includes the right to a minimum wage of £7.83 for over 25-year-olds under the National Minimum Wage Act 1998.
UK labour law

Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992

anti-trade unionTrade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Acttrade union legislation
Under the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 strikes are basically lawful if they are "in contemplation or furtherance of a trade dispute".
The Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 ( c 52) is a UK Act of Parliament which regulates British labour law.

R (National Union of Journalists) v Central Arbitration Committee

This caused particular problems in R (National Union of Journalists) v Central Arbitration Committee as the Court of Appeal held that a recognised union which lacked any significant support could block the bargaining claim of a union with support.
is a UK labour law case, concerning collective bargaining.