A report on United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom in 1914
The signing of the Treaty of Ghent ending the war with the United States (by Amédée Forestier, c. 1915)
The Peterloo Massacre of 1819 resulted in 18 deaths and several hundred injured.
A painting by James Pollard showing the Trafalgar Square before the erection of Nelson's Column
Opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1830
A painting by George Hayter that commemorates the passing of the Reform Act of 1832. It depicts the first session of the newly reformed House of Commons on 5 February 1833. In the foreground, the leading statesmen from the Lords: Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey (1764–1845), William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne (1779–1848) and the Whigs on the left; and Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769–1852) and the Tories on the right.
Lord Palmerston addressing the House of Commons during the debates on the Treaty of France, February 1860
Jeremy Bentham's panopticon prison (1791 drawing by Willey Reveley)
Queen Victoria reigned from 1837 to 1901 (1882 photograph)
The British Empire in 1910
Benjamin Disraeli
Lobby card, 1929
Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
Men of the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment following up the Germans near Brie, March 1917
The Irish Free State (red) in 1922
George V, the last British king to be styled as King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The British state as it existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland.

- United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

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Seán Hogan's flying column of the IRA's 3rd Tipperary Brigade during the war

Irish War of Independence

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Seán Hogan's flying column of the IRA's 3rd Tipperary Brigade during the war
Result of the 1918 UK general election in Ireland
RIC and British Army personnel near Limerick, c.1920
West Connemara IRA flying column
Police wanted poster for Dan Breen, one of those involved in the Soloheadbeg Ambush in 1919.
Wall plaque in Great Denmark Street, Dublin where the Dublin IRA Active Service Unit was founded.
A group of RIC officers in 1917
Michael Collins
A group of "Black and Tans" and Auxiliaries in Dublin, April 1921
British soldiers and relatives of the victims outside Jervis Street Hospital during the military enquiry into the Bloody Sunday shootings at Croke Park
Aftermath of the burning of Cork by British forces
A crowd gathers at the Mansion House in Dublin in the days before the truce
Members of the Irish negotiation committee returning to Ireland in December 1921
The funeral of Michael Collins
St. Mary's Pro-Cathedral, Dublin, August 1922
Catholic-owned businesses destroyed by loyalists in Lisburn, August 1920.
Unionist leader James Craig.
The Lord Lieutenant inspecting troops outside Belfast City Hall on the day Northern Ireland's parliament first met.
A mural in Belfast depicting revenge killings by police in Belfast.
Irish republican internees at Ballykinlar Internment Camp 1920
The symbol of the Republic:
The Irish tricolour which dated back to the Young Ireland rebellion of 1848.
A symbol of British rule:
The standard of the Lord Lieutenant, using the union flag created under the Act of Union 1800.
Monument to IRA fighters in Phibsborough, Dublin
Soldiers of a British cavalry regiment leaving Dublin in 1922
Constance Markievicz was a member of the Irish Citizen Army and fought in the Easter Rising. In 1919 she was appointed Minister for Labour in the Government of the Irish Republic
Conflict deaths in Belfast 1920–1922.
50–100 deaths per km2
100–150 deaths per km2
over 150 deaths per km2

The Irish War of Independence (Cogadh na Saoirse) or Anglo-Irish War was a guerrilla war fought in Ireland from 1919 to 1921 between the Irish Republican Army (IRA, the army of the Irish Republic) and British forces: the British Army, along with the quasi-military Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) and its paramilitary forces the Auxiliaries and Ulster Special Constabulary (USC).

The traditional counties of Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland

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Part of the United Kingdom that is variously described as a country, province, territory or region.

Part of the United Kingdom that is variously described as a country, province, territory or region.

The traditional counties of Northern Ireland
Cannon on the Derry city walls
Scrabo Tower, County Down
Signing of the Ulster Covenant in 1912 in opposition to Home Rule
Result of the 1918 general election in Ireland
Crowds in Belfast for the state opening of the Northern Ireland Parliament on 22 June 1921
The Coat of arms of Northern Ireland used between 1924 and 1973
James Craig (centre) with members of the first government of Northern Ireland
Opening of the Northern Ireland parliament buildings (Stormont) in 1932
Responsibility for Troubles-related deaths between 1969 and 2001
First Minister Ian Paisley (DUP) centre, and deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness (Sinn Féin) left, and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond right in 2008
A flowchart illustrating all the political parties that have existed throughout the history of Northern Ireland and leading up to its formation (covering 1889 to 2020).
Parliament Buildings at Stormont, Belfast, seat of the assembly
Unionist mural in Belfast
ESA Sentinel-2 image of Northern Ireland
Köppen climate types of Northern Ireland
Lough Neagh
Hare's Gap, Mourne Mountains
The Giant's Causeway, County Antrim
Marble Arch Caves
Goliath crane of Harland & Wolff in Belfast
An NIR C3K railcar
2011 census: differences in proportions of those who are, or were brought up, either Catholic or Protestant/Other Christians
Map of predominant national identity in the 2011 census
Map of most commonly held passport
Approximate boundaries of the current and historical English/Scots dialects in Ulster. South to north, the colour bands represent Hiberno-English, South-Ulster English, Mid-Ulster English and the three traditional Ulster Scots areas. The Irish-speaking Gaeltacht is not shown.
Percentage of people aged 3+ claiming to have some ability in Irish in the 2011 census
Percentage of people aged 3+ claiming to have some ability in Ulster Scots in the 2011 census
An Orange march
The logo for the Northern Ireland assembly is based on the flower of the flax plant.
People carrying the Irish flag, overlooking those with the unionist Ulster Banner
George Best, Northern Irish international footballer and 1968 Ballon d'Or
Peter Canavan, Tyrone captain 2003
Prominent Northern Irish golfer Rory McIlroy
Queen's University Belfast
Broadcasting House, Belfast, home of BBC Northern Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was formed in 1801 and governed from London.

Cartoon: British Liberal Party politicians are forced to endure the stink of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's "cigar" of Irish Home Rule. Former Prime Minister Lord Rosebery (left) and future Prime Minister H. H. Asquith (right) both regarded Home Rule as an electoral liability for the Liberals.

Irish Home Rule movement

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Cartoon: British Liberal Party politicians are forced to endure the stink of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's "cigar" of Irish Home Rule. Former Prime Minister Lord Rosebery (left) and future Prime Minister H. H. Asquith (right) both regarded Home Rule as an electoral liability for the Liberals.
Anti-Home Rule cartoon, 1891: it claims that Home Rule will bring economic benefits to middle class "patriots," but ruin to the peasantry.
Charles Stewart Parnell addressing a meeting
Gladstone at a debate on the Irish Home Rule Bill, 8 April 1886
Queensland Figaro and Punch cover, 16 March 1889, depicting Irish Australians offering enthusiastic support to Parnell's struggle for Home Rule.
The Home Rule Club, Kilkenny, founded in 1894
A sticker produced by Ulster loyalists to protest against Irish Home Rule {{efn|Sticker found glued on the inside of the cover of A History of the Siege of Londonderry ... as digitised by Internet Archive |undefined

The Irish Home Rule movement was a movement that campaigned for self-government (or "home rule") for Ireland within the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

The national flag of the Republic of Ireland, which was created to represent all of Ireland

Irish nationalism

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Nationalist political movement which, in its broadest sense, asserts that the people of Ireland should govern Ireland as a sovereign state.

Nationalist political movement which, in its broadest sense, asserts that the people of Ireland should govern Ireland as a sovereign state.

The national flag of the Republic of Ireland, which was created to represent all of Ireland
Government Buildings in Dublin
The green harp flag was first used by Irish Confederate troops in the Eleven Years War, and became the main symbol of Irish nationalism from the 17th to the early 20th century.
"Daniel O'Connell: The Champion of Liberty" poster published in Pennsylvania, 1847
A flowchart illustrating all the political parties that have existed throughout the history of Northern Ireland and leading up to its formation (1889 onwards). Nationalist parties are in green.
Poster for a 1913 anti-Carson meeting, hosted by Protestants of Ballymoney. Speakers included Roger Casement and Robert Glendinning.

It grew more potent during the period in which all of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom, which led to most of the island gaining independence from the UK in 1922.

The Uragh Stone Circle, a Neolithic stone circle in Tuosist, close to Gleninchaquin Park, County Kerry

Ireland

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Island in the North Atlantic Ocean, in north-western Europe.

Island in the North Atlantic Ocean, in north-western Europe.

The Uragh Stone Circle, a Neolithic stone circle in Tuosist, close to Gleninchaquin Park, County Kerry
Stone tools found in Ireland. Photograph taken in the National Museum of Ireland, Dublin.
The Scoti were Gaelic-speaking people from Ireland who settled in western Scotland in the 6th century or before.
Illuminated page from Book of Kells
Remains of the 12th-century Trim Castle in County Meath, the largest Norman castle in Ireland
Political boundaries in Ireland in 1450, before the plantations
Irish soldiers, 1521 – by Albrecht Dürer
A scene from The Image of Irelande (1581) showing a chieftain at a feast
A 16th century perception of Irish women and girls, illustrated in the manuscript "Théâtre de tous les peuples et nations de la terre avec leurs habits et ornemens divers, tant anciens que modernes, diligemment depeints au naturel". Painted by Lucas d'Heere in the 2nd half of the 16th century. Preserved in the Ghent University Library.
Half-hanging of suspected United Irishmen
A depiction of the Great Famine from Our Boys in Ireland by Henry Willard French (1891)
Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street), Dublin, after the 1916 Easter Rising
Annotated page from the Anglo-Irish Treaty that established the Irish Free State and independence for 26 out of 32 Irish counties
Edward Carson signing the Solemn League and Covenant in 1912, declaring opposition to Home Rule "using all means which may be found necessary"
Political entities on the island of Ireland
Áras an Uachtaráin, the official residence of the President of Ireland
Parliament Buildings, in Stormont Estate, seat of the Northern Ireland Assembly
Physical features of Ireland
Two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Gubbeen, County Cork
Red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Killarney National Park
Furze (Ulex europaeus)
Silage harvesting in Clonard, County Meath
A Population density map of Ireland 2002 showing the heavily weighted eastern seaboard and Ulster
Proportion of respondents to the Ireland census 2011 or the Northern Ireland census 2011 who stated they were Catholic. Areas in which Catholics are in the majority are blue. Areas in which Catholics are in a minority are red.
Administrative divisions of Ireland
The population of Ireland since 1603 showing the consequence of the Great Famine (1845–52) (Note: figures before 1841 are contemporary estimates)
Proportion of respondents who said they could speak Irish in the Ireland census in 2011 or the Northern Ireland census in 2011
Ardboe High Cross, County Tyrone
James Joyce one of the most significant writers of the 20th century
Robert Boyle formulated Boyle's Law.
Tyrone v Kerry in the 2005 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Final
Paul O'Connell reaching for the ball during a line out against Argentina in 2007.
Horse racing in Sligo
Gubbeen cheese, an example of the resurgence in Irish cheese making
The Old Bushmills Distillery in County Antrim
A proportional representation of Ireland exports, 2019
Inisheer (Inis Oírr), Aran Islands.
Turf-cutting near Maam Cross by the road to Leenane, Co. Galway.
Dunluce Castle, County Antrim
Benbulbin, County Sligo
Connemara, County Galway
Glendalough, County Wicklow
Ladies View, County Kerry
Slieve League, County Donegal
Giant's Causeway, County Antrim
Skellig Michael, County Kerry
Newgrange, County Meath
Political entities on the island of Ireland

With the Acts of Union in 1801, Ireland became a part of the United Kingdom.

Northern and Southern Ireland

Government of Ireland Act 1920

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The Government of Ireland Act 1920 (10 & 11 Geo.

The Government of Ireland Act 1920 (10 & 11 Geo.

Northern and Southern Ireland
David Lloyd George, MP. The British Prime Minister was the author of the new Act.

Both territories were to remain part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and provision was made for their future reunification through a Council of Ireland.

Clockwise from the top: The road to Bapaume in the aftermath of the Battle of the Somme, 1916

British Mark V tanks crossing the Hindenburg Line, 1918

 sinking after hitting a mine in the Dardanelles, 1915

A British Vickers machine gun crew wearing gas masks during the Battle of the Somme, 1916

German Albatros D.III biplane fighters near Douai, France, 1917

World War I

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World War I or the First World War, often abbreviated as WWI or WW1, began on 28 July 1914 and ended on 11 November 1918.

World War I or the First World War, often abbreviated as WWI or WW1, began on 28 July 1914 and ended on 11 November 1918.

Clockwise from the top: The road to Bapaume in the aftermath of the Battle of the Somme, 1916

British Mark V tanks crossing the Hindenburg Line, 1918

 sinking after hitting a mine in the Dardanelles, 1915

A British Vickers machine gun crew wearing gas masks during the Battle of the Somme, 1916

German Albatros D.III biplane fighters near Douai, France, 1917
Rival military coalitions in 1914: Triple Entente in green; Triple Alliance in brown. Only the Triple Alliance was a formal "alliance"; the others listed were informal patterns of support.
, a, Germany's first response to the British Dreadnought
Sarajevo citizens reading a poster with the proclamation of the Austrian annexation in 1908
Traditionally thought to show the arrest of Gavrilo Princip (right), historians now believe this photo depicts an innocent bystander, Ferdinand Behr
Crowds on the streets in the aftermath of the anti-Serb riots in Sarajevo, 29 June 1914
Ethno-linguistic map of Austria-Hungary, 1910. Bosnia-Herzegovina was annexed in 1908.
Cheering crowds in London and Paris on the day war was declared.
Serbian Army Blériot XI "Oluj", 1915
German soldiers on the way to the front in 1914; at this stage, all sides expected the conflict to be a short one.
French bayonet charge during the Battle of the Frontiers; by the end of August, French casualties exceeded 260,000, including 75,000 dead.
World empires and colonies around 1914
The British Indian infantry divisions were withdrawn from France in December 1915, and sent to Mesopotamia.
Trenches of the 11th Cheshire Regiment at Ovillers-la-Boisselle, on the Somme, July 1916
Royal Irish Rifles in a communications trench, first day on the Somme, 1916
Dead German soldiers at Somme 1916
King George V (front left) and a group of officials inspect a British munitions factory in 1917.
Battleships of the Hochseeflotte, 1917
U-155 exhibited near Tower Bridge in London, after the 1918 Armistice
Refugee transport from Serbia in Leibnitz, Styria, 1914
Bulgarian soldiers in a trench, preparing to fire against an incoming aeroplane
Austro-Hungarian troops executing captured Serbians, 1917. Serbia lost about 850,000 people during the war, a quarter of its pre-war population.
Australian troops charging near a Turkish trench during the Gallipoli Campaign
Mehmed V greeting Wilhelm II on his arrival at Constantinople
Kaiser Wilhelm II inspecting Turkish troops of the 15th Corps in East Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Poland). Prince Leopold of Bavaria, the Supreme Commander of the German Army on the Eastern Front, is second from the left.
Russian forest trench at the Battle of Sarikamish, 1914–1915
Isonzo Offensives 1915-1917
Austro-Hungarian trench at 3,850 metres in the Ortler Alps, one of the most challenging fronts of the war
Romanian troops during the Battle of Mărășești, 1917
Emperor Nicholas II and Commander-in-Chief Nikolai Nikolaevich in the captured Przemysl. The Russian Siege of Przemyśl was the longest siege of the war.
"They shall not pass", a phrase typically associated with the defence of Verdun
President Wilson asking Congress to declare war on Germany, 2 April 1917
The Allied Avenue, 1917 painting by Childe Hassam, that depicts Manhattan's Fifth Avenue decorated with flags from Allied nations
French infantry advance on the Chemin des Dames, April 1917
Canadian Corps troops at the Battle of Vimy Ridge, 1917
10.5 cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 and Ottoman artillerymen at Hareira in 1917 before the Southern Palestine offensive
British artillery battery on Mount Scopus in the Battle of Jerusalem, 1917. Foreground, a battery of 16 heavy guns. Background, conical tents and support vehicles.
Ottoman troops during the Mesopotamian campaign
French soldiers under General Gouraud, with machine guns amongst the ruins of a cathedral near the Marne, 1918
British 55th (West Lancashire) Division soldiers blinded by tear gas during the Battle of Estaires, 10 April 1918
Between April and November 1918, the Allies increased their front-line rifle strength while German strength fell by half.
Aerial view of ruins of Vaux-devant-Damloup, France, 1918
16th Bn (Canadian Scottish), advancing during the Battle of the Canal du Nord, 1918
An American major, piloting an observation balloon near the front, 1918
German Revolution, Kiel, 1918
Italian troops reach Trento during the Battle of Vittorio Veneto, 1918. Italy's victory marked the end of the war on the Italian Front and secured the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
Ferdinand Foch, second from right, pictured outside the carriage in Compiègne after agreeing to the armistice that ended the war there. The carriage was later chosen by Nazi Germany as the symbolic setting of Pétain's June 1940 armistice.
The signing of the Treaty of Versailles in the Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, 28 June 1919, by Sir William Orpen
Greek prime minister Eleftherios Venizelos signing the Treaty of Sèvres
Dissolution of Austria-Hungary after war
Map of territorial changes in Europe after World WarI (as of 1923)
Czechoslovak Legion, Vladivostok, 1918
Transporting Ottoman wounded at Sirkeci
Emergency military hospital during the Spanish flu pandemic, which killed about 675,000 people in the United States alone, Camp Funston, Kansas, 1918
Tanks on parade in London at the end of World War I
A Russian armoured car, 1919
38-cm "Lange Max" of Koekelare (Leugenboom),the biggest gun in the world in 1917
A Canadian soldier with mustard gas burns, c. 1917–1918
British Vickers machine gun, 1917
The
Royal Air Force Sopwith Camel. In April 1917, the average life expectancy of a British pilot on the Western Front was 93 flying hours.
Luftstreitkräfte Fokker Dr.I being inspected by Manfred von Richthofen, also known as the Red Baron.
Mobile radio station in German South West Africa, using a hydrogen balloon to lift the antenna
Austro-Hungarian soldiers executing men and women in Serbia, 1916
HMS Baralong
French soldiers making a gas and flame attack on German trenches in Flanders
Armenians killed during the Armenian Genocide. Image taken from Ambassador Morgenthau's Story, written by Henry Morgenthau Sr. and published in 1918.
German prisoners in a French prison camp during the later part of the war
British prisoners guarded by Ottoman forces after the First Battle of Gaza in 1917
Poster urging women to join the British war effort, published by the Young Women's Christian Association
Bermuda Volunteer Rifle Corps First Contingent in Bermuda, winter 1914–1915, before joining 1 Lincolnshire Regiment in France in June 1915. The dozen remaining after Guedecourt on 25 September 1916, merged with a Second Contingent. The two contingents suffered 75% casualties.
Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street) after the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin
The Deserter, 1916: Anti-war cartoon depicting Jesus facing a firing squad with soldiers from five European countries
Possible execution at Verdun at the time of the mutinies in 1917. The original French text accompanying this photograph notes, however, that the uniforms are those of 1914–15 and that the execution may be that of a spy at the beginning of the war.
Bolshevik leaders Lenin and Trotsky promised "Peace, Land and Bread" to the impoverished masses
Young men registering for conscription, New York City, 5 June 1917
Military recruitment in Melbourne, Australia, 1914
British volunteer recruits in London, August 1914
1917 political cartoon about the Zimmermann Telegram. The message was intercepted by the British; its publication caused outrage and contributed to the U.S. entry into World War I.
The Italian Redipuglia War Memorial, which contains the remains of 100,187 soldiers
A typical village war memorial to soldiers killed in World War I
A 1919 book for veterans, from the US War Department
Poster showing women workers, 1915
War memorial to soldiers of the 49th Bengalee Regiment (Bangali Platoon) in Kolkata, India, who died in the war.

In Britain in 1914, the Public Schools Officers' Training Corps annual camp was held at Tidworth Pennings, near Salisbury Plain.

Ulster

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One of the four traditional Irish provinces.

One of the four traditional Irish provinces.

Ulster (coloured), showing Northern Ireland in pink and the Republic of Ireland part in green
A bronze statue commemorating The Flight of the Earls at Rathmullan in north County Donegal.
A modern Protestant mural in Belfast celebrating Oliver Cromwell and his activities.
Royal Avenue, Belfast. Photochrom print circa 1890–1900.
The results of the 1918 Irish general election, in which Sinn Féin and the Irish Parliamentary Party won the majority of votes on the island of Ireland, shown in the color green and light green respectively, with the exception being primarily in the East of the province of Ulster.
At White Park Bay
Countryside west of Ballynahinch
Mourne country cottage
The track of the County Donegal Railways Joint Committee (CDRJC) restored next to Lough Finn, near Fintown station.
The approach of autumn, Tardree forest

Along with the rest of Ireland, Ulster became part of the United Kingdom in 1801.

The Irish harp, along with the coat of arms of the provinces of Ireland, played a prominent role in IPP literature.

Irish Parliamentary Party

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The Irish harp, along with the coat of arms of the provinces of Ireland, played a prominent role in IPP literature.
Charles Stewart Parnell, the founder of the IPP
Graph of Irish UK MPs 1885–1918 in numbers

The Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP; commonly called the Irish Party or the Home Rule Party) was formed in 1874 by Isaac Butt, the leader of the Nationalist Party, replacing the Home Rule League, as official parliamentary party for Irish nationalist Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons at Westminster within the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland up until 1918.

Portrait by Thomas Lawrence, c. 1815–16, painted after the Battle of Waterloo

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

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Portrait by Thomas Lawrence, c. 1815–16, painted after the Battle of Waterloo
Wellesley spent much of his early childhood at his family's ancestral home, Dangan Castle in County Meath, Ireland (engraving, 1842).
Beginning in 1787, Wellesley served at Dublin Castle (pictured) as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland.
Wellesley as Lieutenant Colonel, aged c. 26, in the 33rd Regiment. Portrait by John Hoppner
Wellesley in India, wearing his major-general's uniform. Portrait by Robert Home, 1804
Arthur Wellesley (mounted) at the Battle of Assaye (engraving after William Heath). Wellesley later remarked that it was his greatest victory.
Major-General Wellesley meeting with Nawab Azim-ud-Daula, 1805
Reenactors of the 33rd Regiment of Foot Wellington's Redcoats who fought in the Napoleonic Wars, 1812–1815, here showing the standard line 8th Company
Wellington at the Battle of Salamanca (engraving after William Heath)
The Duke of Wellington by Francisco Goya, 1812–14
Wellington (far left) alongside Metternich, Talleyrand and other European diplomats at the Congress of Vienna, 1815 (engraving after Jean-Baptiste Isabey)
Engraving of Wellesley by William Say after Thomas Phillips
Wellington at Waterloo, by Robert Alexander Hillingford
The Grenadiers à Cheval. Napoleon can be seen in the background on a grey horse.
The storming of La Haye Sainte, by Richard Knötel
Wellington at the battle of Waterloo
British 10th Hussars of Vivian's Brigade (red shakos – blue uniforms) attacking mixed French troops, including a square of Guard grenadiers (left, middle distance) in the final stages of the battle
Wellington at the battle of Waterloo. Detail of a painting by Jan Willem Pieneman, 1824
Portrait of the Duke of Wellington by John Jackson, 1830–31
A satirical cartoon attacking the Duke of Wellington, then prime minister, for the passage in April 1829 of the Roman Catholic Relief Act
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Portrait miniature of an elderly Wellington, by Robert Thorburn
Wellesley's funeral procession passing the Archway at Apsley House
Wellington's tomb, in St Paul's Cathedral, London
A bronze statue of Wellington by Carlo Marochetti in Woodhouse Moor, Leeds
The Duke of Wellington, c. 1850
Plaster model, located at the Victoria and Albert Museum, of the 'Valour and Cowardice' motif used in the memorial to Wellington at St. Paul's Cathedral
Apsley House in 1829, by Thomas H. Shepherd
Sir John Steell's equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington – 'the Iron Duke in bronze by Steell' Edinburgh 1852

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and Tory statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as prime minister of the United Kingdom.