A report on United Nations

Members of the United Nations
1943 sketch by Franklin Roosevelt of the UN original three branches: The Four Policemen, an executive branch, and an international assembly of forty UN member states
The UN in 1945: founding members in light blue, protectorates and territories of the founding members in dark blue
Dag Hammarskjöld was a particularly active secretary-general from 1953 until his death in 1961.
Kofi Annan, secretary-general from 1997 to 2006
Flags of member nations at the United Nations Headquarters, seen in 2007
Mikhail Gorbachev, Soviet general secretary, addressing the UN General Assembly in December 1988
Colin Powell, the US Secretary of State, demonstrates a vial with alleged Iraq chemical weapon probes to the UN Security Council on Iraq war hearings, 5 February 2003
Current secretary-general, António Guterres
The ICJ ruled that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 did not violate international law.
Under Sukarno, Indonesia became the first and only country to leave the United Nations.
A Nepalese soldier on a peacekeeping deployment providing security at a rice distribution site in Haiti during 2010
The UN Buffer Zone in Cyprus was established in 1974 following the Turkish invasion of Cyprus.
Eleanor Roosevelt with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1949
Three former directors of the Global Smallpox Eradication Programme reading the news that smallpox has been globally eradicated in 1980
In Jordan, UNHCR remains responsible for the Syrian refugees and the Zaatari refugee camp.
The 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to the UN—diploma in the lobby of the UN Headquarters in New York City
Marking of the UN's 70th anniversary – Budapest, 2015

Intergovernmental organization whose purposes are to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international cooperation, and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.

- United Nations

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Overall

Super Six-Four, one of the Black Hawks which would be shot down, above Mogadishu

Battle of Mogadishu (1993)

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Part of Operation Gothic Serpent.

Part of Operation Gothic Serpent.

Super Six-Four, one of the Black Hawks which would be shot down, above Mogadishu
U.S. Marine Corps helicopter surveying a residential area in Mogadishu as part of Operation Restore Hope (1992).
Abandoned "Green Line" dividing the warring factions in North and South Mogadishu (January 1993).
US president George H. W. Bush (left) visiting Somalia to witness the efforts of Task Force Somalia that was in direct support of Operation Restore Hope.
A sign at an anti-UNOSOM protest in Mogadishu depicting Bloody Monday
Bravo Company, 3rd Battalion of the 75th Ranger Regiment in Somalia, 1993.
The crew of Super 64 a month before the Battle of Mogadishu. From left: Winn Mahuron, Tommy Field, Bill Cleveland, Ray Frank and Mike Durant.
Helicopter taking off for the mission on 3 October
Fiat-Oto Melara Type 6616 armored personnel carrier seized from USC/SNA leader Mohamed Farrah Aidid's weapons cantonment area.
Mogadishu battle sites on 3–4 October 1993.
Rangers near the target building.
Improvised fighting vehicle in Mogadishu.
Malaysian Condor APCs.
A Pakistani UNOSOM armed convoy making the rounds.
Chalk Four Ranger returns to base after a mission in Somalia, 1993.
Column of M1A1 Abrams and M2 Bradley of 64th Armor Regiment in Mogadishu in January 1994.
Cpl. Jamie Smith Memorial - Schooley's Mountain, New Jersey
US President Bill Clinton presenting the Medal of Honor to Carmen, the widow of Master Sergeant Gary I. Gordon, who served as Sniper Team Leader in the United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu.
The mostly intact main rotor of Black Hawk Super 61, which was shot down in Mogadishu, Somalia in October 1993. This is one of the "Black Hawks Down."

The United Nations had initially become involved to provide food aid to alleviate starvation in the south of the country, but in the months preceding the battle, had shifted the mission to establishing democracy and restoring a central government.

Taiwan

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Taiwan has been settled for at least 25,000 years.

Taiwan has been settled for at least 25,000 years.

A young Tsou man
Fort Zeelandia, the Governor's residence in Dutch Formosa
Hunting deer, painted in 1746
Japanese colonial soldiers march Taiwanese captured after the Tapani Incident in 1915 from the Tainan jail to court.
General Chen Yi (right) accepting the receipt of General Order No. 1 from Rikichi Andō (left), the last Japanese Governor-General of Taiwan, in Taipei City Hall
The Nationalists' retreat to Taipei
Chiang Kai-shek, leader of the Kuomintang from 1925 until his death in 1975
With Chiang Kai-shek, US president Dwight D. Eisenhower waved to crowds during his visit to Taipei in June 1960.
In 1988, Lee Teng-hui became the first president of the Republic of China born in Taiwan and was the first to be directly elected in 1996.
Student protest in Taipei against a controversial trade agreement with China in March 2014
A satellite image of Taiwan, showing it is mostly mountainous in the east, with gently sloping plains in the west. The Penghu Islands are west of the main island.
Köppen climate classification of Taiwan
Dabajian Mountain
2015 Ma–Xi meeting
ROC embassy in Eswatini
The flag used by Taiwan at the Olympic Games, where it competes as "Chinese Taipei" (中華台北)
Taiwan's popularly elected president resides in the Presidential Office Building, Taipei, originally built in the Japanese era for colonial governors
Tsai Ing-wen, President of the Republic of China
Su Tseng-chang, Premier of the Republic of China
Taiwanese-born Tangwai ("independent") politician Wu San-lien (second left) celebrates with supporters his landslide victory of 65.5 per cent in Taipei's first mayoral election in January 1951.
Results from an identity survey conducted each year from 1992 to 2020 by the Election Study Center, National Chengchi University. Responses are Taiwanese (green), Chinese (red) or Both Taiwanese and Chinese (hatched). No response is shown as grey.
Republic of China Army’s Thunderbolt-2000, a multiple rocket launcher
The C-130H in Songshan AFB
Taipei 101 held the world record for the highest skyscraper from 2004 to 2010.
Neihu Technology Park in Taipei
Rice paddy fields in Yilan County
China Airlines aircraft line-up at Taoyuan International Airport
Children at a Taiwanese school
Population density map of Taiwan (residents per square kilometre)
Original geographic distributions of Taiwanese indigenous peoples
Most commonly used home language in each area, darker in proportion to the lead over the next most common
National Taiwan University Hospital
Apo Hsu and the NTNU Symphony Orchestra onstage in the National Concert Hall
Taiwanese writer, literary critic and politician Wang Tuoh
Yani Tseng with the 2011 Women's British Open trophy
Tai Tzu-ying, the current world No.1 in BWF at the 2018 Chinese Taipei Open
St. John's Catholic Church in Banqiao District, New Taipei
Countries maintaining relations with the ROCdiplomatic relations and embassy in Taipei
unofficial relations (see text)
The Chinese Professional Baseball League (CPBL) is the top-tier professional baseball league in Taiwan

The ROC no longer represents China as a member of the United Nations, after UN members voted in 1971 to recognize the PRC instead.

Sustainable Development Goals

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The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) or Global Goals are a collection of 17 interlinked global goals designed to be a "blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all".

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) or Global Goals are a collection of 17 interlinked global goals designed to be a "blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all".

A diagram listing the 17 Sustainable Development Goals
Sufficient and healthy foods should be made available to everyone
Mothers with healthy children in rural India
School children in Kakuma refugee camp, Kenya
Example of sanitation for all: School toilet (IPH school and college, Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh)
Solar panels on house roof
Nusa Lembongan Reef
World map showing countries that are closest to meeting the SDGs (in dark blue) and those with the greatest remaining challenges (in the lightest shade of blue) in 2018.
Young people holding SDG banners in Lima, Peru
Training on Education for sustainable development workshop in Kasese district Uganda
SDG wedding cake model: A way of viewing the economic, social and ecological aspects of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Boeing 787 of XiamenAir uses a GEnx engine which reduces carbon emissions and noise pollution.
Cost comparison for UN Goals
Katherine Maher, Executive Director of the Wikimedia Foundation, talks about "The role of free knowledge in advancing the SDGs" in Stockholm, 2019
A proposal to visualize the 17 SDGs in a thematic pyramid.
Global Goals Week logo
The sustainable development goals are a UN initiative.
UN SDG consultations in Mariupol, Ukraine

Though the goals are broad and interdependent, two years later (6 July 2017) the SDGs were made more "actionable" by a UN Resolution adopted by the General Assembly.

A generic symbol for gender equality

Gender equality

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State of equal ease of access to resources and opportunities regardless of gender, including economic participation and decision-making; and the state of valuing different behaviors, aspirations and needs equally, regardless of gender.

State of equal ease of access to resources and opportunities regardless of gender, including economic participation and decision-making; and the state of valuing different behaviors, aspirations and needs equally, regardless of gender.

A generic symbol for gender equality
Gender equality
From the documentary Ukraine Is Not a Brothel. Radical group Femen protest against the increase in sex tourism into Ukraine.
There is controversy with regard to ideologies according to which Western culture and Western feminism should be considered the international standard to be followed by the developing world.
An example of a Western European ideology responsible for persecution of women: Malleus Maleficarum, a book endorsing the extermination of witches. The book was written by the German Catholic clergyman Heinrich Kramer.
Map showing prevalence of FGM, only in Africa
Maternal mortality ratio (with Sustainable Development Goal target) as of 2015
Map of countries by fertility rate (2020), according to the Population Reference Bureau
A map of the world showing murders per 100,000 population committed against women, 2019
Anti-FGM road sign, Bakau, Gambia, 2005
An X-ray of two bound feet. Foot binding was practiced for centuries in China.
Global maternal mortality rate per 100 000 live births (2010)
In 2010, Sierra Leone launched free healthcare for pregnant and breastfeeding women
A wall along a residential lane in Guangzhou, China, with family planning posters stressing the importance of balanced sex-ratios, in order to prevent sex-selective abortion
Placard showing negative effects of lack of family planning and having too many children and infants (Ethiopia)
A family planning facility in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia
Anti-dowry poster in Bangalore, India
FGM in Africa, Iraqi Kurdistan and Yemen, as of 2015 (map of Africa).
Road sign near Kapchorwa, Uganda, 2004
Poster against child and forced marriage
Gender pay gap in average gross hourly earnings in the EU member states, according to Eurostat 2014
Women in Afghanistan wearing burqas. Some clothes that women are required to wear, by law or custom, can restrict their movements.
School girls in Gaza Strip
Headquarters of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, United States, early 20th century
A world map showing countries governmental participation by women, 2010
1952 portrayal of stereotypes about women drivers, based on the stereotype that women cannot drive well. Features Bettie Page.
Map showing countries which since independence have had (counting Governors-General as heads of state, but excluding monarchs):
Female head of government
Female head of state
Female head of state/government (combined)
Female head of state and female head of government
Three former sovereign states (East Germany, Tannu Tuva, and Yugoslavia) have also had a female Head of State or Head of Government

As of 2017, gender equality is the fifth of seventeen sustainable development goals (SDG 5) of the United Nations.

Trygve Lie in 1938

Trygve Lie

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Norwegian politician, labour leader, government official and author.

Norwegian politician, labour leader, government official and author.

Trygve Lie in 1938
Resignation of Lie in November 1952

From 1946 to 1952 he was the first Secretary-General of the United Nations.

The Hague

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City and municipality of the Netherlands, situated on the west coast facing the North Sea.

City and municipality of the Netherlands, situated on the west coast facing the North Sea.

The Binnenhof at the Hofvijver, 1625
Street in The Hague by Sybrand van Beest, c. 1650, Royal Castle in Warsaw
The Old City Hall of The Hague around 1900
The Ministry of Justice and Security building, opened in 2012
Detailed topographic map of The Hague, 2014
The Hague, divided into neighbourhoods
The Hofvijver and the buildings housing the States General of the Netherlands
View of the Hoftoren (left) and the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport (the triangular gable right)
The Hague City Hall
The Peace Palace houses the International Court of Justice and Permanent Court of Arbitration amongst other institutions.
International Criminal Court
Meeting in the Hall of Knights during the Congress of Europe (9 May 1948)
The Hague's central financial district, Beatrixkwartier, with the modern tram viaduct called the Netkous ("Fishnet stocking")
Cars Jeans Stadion
Modern RegioCitadis tram on route 2, Loosduinen, April 2012
Internal view of The Hague Central station
The Ridderzaal inside the Binnenhof, the political centre of the Netherlands
Monument commemorating the founding of the Kingdom of the Netherlands at Plein 1813
Noordeinde Palace
Grote of Sint-Jacobskerk

The International Court of Justice, the main judicial arm of the United Nations, is located in the city, as are the International Criminal Court, the Permanent Court of Arbitration, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, Europol, and approximately 200 other international governmental organizations.

Map indicating places where the language is called castellano (in red) or español (in blue)

Spanish language

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Romance language of the Indo-European language family that evolved from colloquial spoken Latin in the Iberian Peninsula of Europe.

Romance language of the Indo-European language family that evolved from colloquial spoken Latin in the Iberian Peninsula of Europe.

Map indicating places where the language is called castellano (in red) or español (in blue)
The Visigothic Cartularies of Valpuesta, written in a late form of Latin, were declared in 2010 by the Royal Spanish Academy as the record of the earliest words written in Castilian, predating those of the Glosas Emilianenses.
Chronological map showing linguistic evolution in southwest Europe
Antonio de Nebrija, author of Gramática de la lengua castellana, the first grammar of a modern European language.
Percentage of the U.S. population aged 5 and over who speaks Spanish at home in 2019, by states.
Spanish language signage in Malabo, capital city of Equatorial Guinea.
Early flag of the Filipino revolutionaries ("Long live the Philippine Republic!!!"). The first two constitutions were written in Spanish.
Announcement in Spanish on Easter Island, welcoming visitors to Rapa Nui National Park
Miguel de Cervantes, considered by many the greatest author of Spanish literature, and author of Don Quixote, widely considered the first modern European novel.
Spanish vowel chart, from
A world map attempting to identify the main dialects of Spanish.
An examination of the dominance and stress of the voseo feature in Hispanic America. Data generated as illustrated by the Association of Spanish Language Academies. The darker the area, the stronger its dominance.
The Rashi script, originally used to print Judaeo-Spanish.
An original letter in Haketia, written in 1832.
Arms of the Royal Spanish Academy
The Royal Spanish Academy Headquarters in Madrid, Spain.
Countries members of the ASALE.
Cervantes Institute headquarters, Madrid
Geographical distribution of the Spanish language
Official or co-official language
1,000,000+
100,000+
20,000+
Percentage of people who self reportedly know enough Spanish to hold a conversation, in the EU, 2005
Native country
More than 8.99%
Between 4% and 8.99%
Between 1% and 3,99%
Less than 1%

Spanish is one of the six official languages of the United Nations, and it is also used as an official language by the European Union, the Organization of American States, the Union of South American Nations, the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, the African Union and List of cmany other international organizations.

A map of World Bank high-income economies in 2019; high-income economies are indicated in blue, while former high-income economies are shown in teal.

Developing country

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Not universally agreed upon. There is also no clear agreement on which countries fit this category. The term low and middle-income country (LMIC) is often used interchangeably but refers only to the economy of the countries. The World Bank classifies the world's economies into four groups, based on gross national income per capita: high, upper-middle, lower-middle, and low income countries. Least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states are all sub-groupings of developing countries. Countries on the other end of the spectrum are usually referred to as high-income countries or developed countries.

Not universally agreed upon. There is also no clear agreement on which countries fit this category. The term low and middle-income country (LMIC) is often used interchangeably but refers only to the economy of the countries. The World Bank classifies the world's economies into four groups, based on gross national income per capita: high, upper-middle, lower-middle, and low income countries. Least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states are all sub-groupings of developing countries. Countries on the other end of the spectrum are usually referred to as high-income countries or developed countries.

A map of World Bank high-income economies in 2019; high-income economies are indicated in blue, while former high-income economies are shown in teal.
Newly industrialized countries.
Countries by 2019 GDP (nominal) per capita
World regions by total wealth (in trillions USD), 2018
A formation of human chain at India Gate by the women from different walks of life at the launch of a National Campaign on prevention of violence against women, in New Delhi on 2 October 2009
Percentage of women older than 14 who have experienced violence by an intimate partner
Solar cookers use sunlight as energy source for outdoor cooking.
Factory in China at Yangtze River causing air pollution.
Plastic pollution at a beach near Accra, Ghana
Average surface air temperatures from 2011 to 2020 compared to the 1951–1980 average. Source: NASA.
Map of countries and territories by fertility rate as of 2020
Developed countries
Developing countries
Least developed countries
Data unavailable
The latest classifications sorted by the IMF and the UN

If the Sustainable Development Goals which were set up by the United Nations for the year 2030 are achieved, they would overcome many of these problems.

United Nations Human Rights Council

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The Human Rights and Alliance of Civilizations Room is the meeting room of the United Nations Human Rights Council, in the Palace of Nations in Geneva.
Protest at UN against China's re-election in the Human Rights Council
Saudi Arabian-led airstrikes in Yemen, June 2015. Saudi Arabia is operating without a UN mandate.

The United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) is a United Nations body whose mission is to promote and protect human rights around the world.

Military situation in Sudan on 6 June 2016. (Darfur on the far left)




For a more detailed map of the current military situation in Sudan, see here.

War in Darfur

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Major armed conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan that began in February 2003 when the Sudan Liberation Movement and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) rebel groups began fighting against the government of Sudan, which they accused of oppressing Darfur's non-Arab population.

Major armed conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan that began in February 2003 when the Sudan Liberation Movement and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) rebel groups began fighting against the government of Sudan, which they accused of oppressing Darfur's non-Arab population.

Military situation in Sudan on 6 June 2016. (Darfur on the far left)




For a more detailed map of the current military situation in Sudan, see here.
Arab Janjaweed tribes have been a major player in the conflict.
Darfur refugee camp in Chad, 2005
AMIS soldiers from Rwanda preparing to depart to Darfur in 2005.
Minni Minnawi with U.S. President George W. Bush after he signed the May agreement.
Children in the camps are encouraged to confront their psychological scars. The clay figures depict an attack by Janjaweed.
Displaced persons with water tank in Geneina, West Darfur in 2007
SLM combatants
Darfur men in 2008
A UN Peacekeeper in the Abu Shouk IDP Camp, September 2009
Pro-government militia in Darfur. (2013)
Destroyed villages (August 2004)
Internally displaced persons' camp
A mother with her sick baby at Abu Shouk IDP camp in North Darfur
U.S. President George W. Bush speaking to the UN General Assembly on the crisis in Darfur, September 21, 2004
The Save Darfur Coalition advocacy group coordinated a large rally in New York in April 2006. Depicted here is a discarded protest sign littering the street.

The African Union and the United Nations also have a joint peacekeeping mission in the region, named UNAMID.