United States Air Force

The first F-35 Lightning II of the 33rd Fighter Wing arriving at Eglin AFB
An Air Force RQ-4 strategic reconnaissance aircraft
An Air Force KC-46 Pegasus refuels a C-17A Globemaster III
An Air Force A-10 demonstrating close air support at Nellis AFB
Test launch of a LGM-30 Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missile from Vandenberg AFB
Combined Air Operations Center at Al Udeid Air Base
Roundels that have appeared on U.S. military aircraft
1.) 5/1917–2/1918
2.) 2/1918–8/1919
3.) 8/1919–5/1942
4.) 5/1942–6/1943
5.) 6/1943–9/1943
6.) 9/1943–1/1947
7.) 1/1947–
The SR-71 Blackbird was a Cold War reconnaissance plane.
The F-117 Nighthawk was a stealth attack aircraft (retired from service in April 2008).
A row of Douglas C-54 Skymasters during the Berlin Airlift in 1949
Various Air Force personnel pose during the Air Force's 74th birthday celebration at the Pentagon, September 17, 2021.
Organization of the United States Air Force within the Department of Defense
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Pararescuemen and a simulated "survivor" watch as an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter comes in for a landing
U.S. Air Force trainee demonstrating a butt stroke on a strike dummy as part of Basic Military Training.
USAF Airmen training at Lackland AFB
A-10 Thunderbolt II ground-attack aircraft
B-2 Spirit stealth bomber
A C-17 Globemaster III, the USAF's newest and most versatile transport plane
E-3 Sentry airborne warning and control system
F-22 Raptor stealth air superiority fighter
KC-10 Extender tri-jet air-to-air tanker
An MC-12W Liberty at Beale AFB
MQ-9 unmanned aerial vehicle
Lockheed U-2 spy plane
RQ-170 Sentinel stealth unmanned aerial vehicle reconnaissance aircraft
VC-25A (Air Force One)
A WC-130J Hercules from the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron
An unarmed Minuteman III ICBM shoots out of the silo during an operational test launch

Air service branch of the United States Armed Forces, and is one of the eight U.S. uniformed services.

- United States Air Force
The first F-35 Lightning II of the 33rd Fighter Wing arriving at Eglin AFB

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A U.S. Air Force-owned F-35A

Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II

American family of single-seat, single-engine, all-weather stealth multirole combat aircraft that is intended to perform both air superiority and strike missions.

American family of single-seat, single-engine, all-weather stealth multirole combat aircraft that is intended to perform both air superiority and strike missions.

A U.S. Air Force-owned F-35A
X-35B flying over Edwards Air Force Base
An F-35 wind tunnel testing model in 16 ft transonic wind tunnel at the Arnold Engineering Development Center
The first F-35A prototype, AA-1, being towed to its inauguration ceremony on 7 July 2006.
USAF F-35A at RAF Fairford for RIAT 2018
Two USAF F-35As and two French Dassault Rafales break formation during a flight over France.
(From the top) F-35A of the 33rd FW, F-35B of VMFAT-501 and F-35C of VFA-101 near Eglin AFB, 2014
Electro-optical target system (EOTS) under the nose of an F-35
AN/APG-81 AESA radar antenna
Note the sawtooth design on the landing gear door and access panels
F-35 cockpit simulator
The F-35's helmet-mounted display system
F-35A with all weapon bay doors open
Illustration of the STOVL swivel nozzle, lift fan, and roll-control posts
The first delivered USAF F-35 on its delivery flight to Eglin AFB, July 2011
An F-35B launches off the ski-jump of HMS Queen Elizabeth, 2018
A F/A-18E Super Hornet (left) provides aerial refueling to a USMC F-35B
F-35B ZM148 of No. 617 Squadron landing on HMS Queen Elizabeth, 2019
An RAAF F-35A at the 2019 Australian International Airshow in Avalon, Victoria
The F-35I Adir (accompanied by a 253 Squadron F-16I Sufa) on its debut flight in Israel, December 2016
First Norwegian F-35 Lightning II at Luke Air Force Base
One of the RAAF's first two F-35As in December 2014
On 3 October 2021, the first F-35Bs performed landings and take-offs from JS Izumo
First four RAF F-35Bs on a delivery flight to RAF Marham, June 2018
USN F-35C performs a touch-and-go landing aboard {{USS|Abraham Lincoln|CVN-72|6|undefined
F-35A 3-view drawing
F-35B cutaway with lift fan

United States Air Force – 1,763 F-35As planned

A KC-135R refuels an F-15 Eagle

Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker

American military aerial refueling aircraft that was developed from the Boeing 367-80 prototype, alongside the Boeing 707 airliner.

American military aerial refueling aircraft that was developed from the Boeing 367-80 prototype, alongside the Boeing 707 airliner.

A KC-135R refuels an F-15 Eagle
A KC-135A refueling a B-52D during the Cold War. Both aircraft types were operated by the Strategic Air Command.
On 11 November 1957, Air Force Vice Chief of Staff General Curtis LeMay tested the first KC-135 on a long-haul flight from Westover Air Force Base, Massachusetts to Buenos Aires, Argentine.
A nose-on view of several re-engined KC-135R aircraft taxiing prior to takeoff. The new engines are CFM56-2 high-bypass turbofans.
Flight deck of KC-135R; instrument panel has been modified under the Pacer-CRAG program
Block 45 glass cockpit
Cutaway of the Flight Refueling Limited Mk.32B Refueling Pod
USAF KC-135R boom operator view from boom pod
An F-15 backs out after refueling from a KC-135R.
KC-135 winglet flight tests at Armstrong Flight Research Center.
KC-135Rs at twilight on the flight line
View from the boom operator's hatch as a F-35 takes on fuel from a KC-135 of the 912d ARS
Active KC-135 aircraft liveries
Boeing KC-135R Stratotanker (code 62–3567) of the Turkish Air Force arrives at the 2016 Royal International Air Tattoo, England
Turkish KC-135R Stratotanker nicknamed Asena.
Six KC-135 Stratotankers demonstrate the elephant walk formation.
Cargo door of a USAF KC-135 of the 452d AMW at March Air Reserve Base
64 ARS and 157 ARW personnel working on a KC-135R at Pease ANGB in September 2013
Tail of an Air Force Reserve Command KC-135R tanker showing refueling boom
Boom-drogue adapter refueling a U.S. Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet

The KC-135 entered service with the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1957; it is one of nine military fixed-wing aircraft with over 60 years of continuous service with its original operator.

An F-15E from the 391st Fighter Squadron

McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle

American all-weather multirole strike fighter derived from the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle.

American all-weather multirole strike fighter derived from the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle.

An F-15E from the 391st Fighter Squadron
The second TF-15A, AF Ser. No. 71-0291, used as an F-15E demonstrator
First production F-15E, 86-0183
Forward cockpit of an F-15E with three multifunction displays
A wing-over maneuver displays the clean lines and high-wing design of an F-15E from Elmendorf AFB, Alaska
An underside view of an F-15E Strike Eagle with landing gear down
USAF F-15Es, accompanied by an F-15C and two F-16s, flying over burning Kuwaiti oil wells.
An F-15E over Iraq in 1999 for Operation Northern Watch
F-15E departing Aviano Air Base, Italy, for a strike mission in Operation Allied Force on 28 March 1999
An F-15E over Afghanistan during Operation Mountain Lion, 2006.
An F-15E of the 391st Expeditionary Fighter Squadron launching heat decoys over Afghanistan, 2008
An F-15E disengaging from a KC-10 during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Note the visible wingtip vortices.
A 492 FS F-15E of the 48th Fighter Wing taking off from RAF Lakenheath
Israeli Air Force F-15I Ra'am
A USAF F-15E refueling over the mountains of Afghanistan
An IAF F-15I (Ra'am) of the No 69 "Hammers" Squadron maneuvers away after receiving fuel from a KC-135 during Red Flag 2004
F-15K at Nellis AFB, Nevada, 2008 for the Red Flag 08-4 exercise
A F-15SG of the Singapore Air Force
An F-15EX Eagle II from the 40th Flight Test Squadron flies in formation during an aerial refueling operation above the skies of Northern California, 14 May 2021.
Current operators of the F-15 in light blue, F-15E Strike Eagle in red, both in dark blue
A F-15K of the South Korean Air Force
An F-15E undergoing maintenance showing the M61 Vulcan Gatling gun with its cover removed.
An F-15E releasing a GBU-28 "Bunker Buster" during a test
LANTIRN pods mounted underneath the engine intakes of an F-15E Strike Eagle, the AN/AAQ-13 navigation pod to the left with the AN/AAQ-14 targeting pod to the right
Saudi Arabian F-15S along with armaments

United States Air Force (USAF) F-15E Strike Eagles can be generally distinguished from other US Eagle variants by darker aircraft camouflage, conformal fuel tanks (CFTs) mounted along the engine intake ramps (although CFTs can also be mounted on earlier F-15 variants) and a tandem-seat cockpit.

United States Air Force Combat Systems Officer Wings

Combat systems officer

United States Air Force Combat Systems Officer Wings

A Combat Systems Officer (or CSO, differs from CSOp) is a flight member of an aircrew in the United States Air Force and is the mission commander in many multi-crew aircraft.

An AC-130H gunship from the 16th Special Operations Squadron

Lockheed AC-130

Heavily armed, long-endurance, ground-attack variant of the C-130 Hercules transport, fixed-wing aircraft.

Heavily armed, long-endurance, ground-attack variant of the C-130 Hercules transport, fixed-wing aircraft.

An AC-130H gunship from the 16th Special Operations Squadron
AC-130H Spectre near Hurlburt Field, Florida in 1988
AC-130U armed with two 30 mm Bushmasters, 2007
Underside of an AC-130U Spooky
AC-130U sensor suite
An AC-130 in Southern Laos circa 1970
An AC-130A performs a left-hand pylon turn.
Smoke visible from rotary cannon during twilight operations in 1988
An AC-130U releasing flares
AC-130U over Hurlburt Field
Nose art on AC-130A AF Serial No. 53–3129 at the USAF Armament Museum, Eglin AFB, Florida
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AC-130U Spooky
Gunners loading 40 mm cannon (background) and 105 mm cannon (foreground)
AC-130H Spectre over Santa Rosa Island, Northwest Florida coast.

The sole operator is the United States Air Force, which uses the AC-130U Spooky and AC-130W Stinger II variants for close air support, air interdiction, and force protection, with the upgraded AC-130J Ghostrider entering service.

A B-1B in flight

Rockwell B-1 Lancer

A B-1B in flight
The XB-70 Valkyrie was chosen in 1957 to replace the Hustler, but suffered as a result of a switch in doctrine from high to low-altitude flying profiles
AN/APQ-140 radar for the B-1A
B-1A prototype
B-1A Prototype 4 showing its anti-flash white underside in 1981
B-1A nose section with ejection capsule denoted. Three of the four B-1As were fitted with escape capsules.
A Rockwell B-1A in 1984
The first B-1B debuted outside a hangar in Palmdale, California, 1984
A B-1B banking during a demonstration in 2004
Rear view of a B-1B in flight, 2004
A B-1B cockpit at night
AN/APQ-164 passive electronically scanned array
Nose of a B-1 showing the Sniper XR pod hanging below and triangular ride-control fins
A dismantled decommissioned B-1 being transported by flatbed truck
A B-1B with wings swept full forward
Transferring a GBU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) to a lift truck for loading onto a B-1B on 29 March 2007, in Southwest Asia
The rear section showing the B-1A's pointed radome
A 28th Bomb Wing B-1B on the ramp in the early morning at Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota
A B-1B on public display at Ellsworth AFB, 2003
A B-1B arrives at Royal International Air Tattoo 2008
A B-1B at the Museum of Aviation, Robins AFB
A B-1B at the National Museum of the USAF, Dayton, OH
A B-1B with a brake fire after a hard landing at Rhein-Main AB, Germany, June 1994.
B-1A orthographic projection
B-1B cockpit
B-1B forward bomb bay fitted with a rotary launcher

The Rockwell B-1 Lancer is a supersonic variable-sweep wing, heavy bomber used by the United States Air Force.

The prototype C-17, known as T-1, on a test flight in 2007

Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

The prototype C-17, known as T-1, on a test flight in 2007
The McDonnell Douglas YC-15 design was used as the basis for the C-17.
Paratroopers dropping from a C-17 during a training exercise in 2010
Cockpit of a C-17
A Royal Australian Air Force C-17 landing at Kharkiv International Airport, showing its landing gear
USAF C-17s fly over the Blue Ridge Mountains in the eastern U.S. in December 2005
The U.S. Presidential Limousine is transported by a C-17 for long-distance trips.
An RAAF C-17 in 2010
A Royal Canadian Air Force C-17 (code 177703) departs the 2017 Royal International Air Tattoo, RAF Fairford, England
One of the Strategic Airlift Capability C-17s
IAF C-17s
Qatar Emiri Air Force C-17
A Kuwait Air Force C-17 in 2015
Map of countries that operate the C-17 Globemaster III (highlighted in blue)
U.S. Air Force C-17 transporting a Dutch PzH 2000 self-propelled howitzer to Afghanistan, 2006
An RAF Chinook helicopter is loaded into a C-17
A C-17 in its aeromedical evacuation configuration
U.S. Army paratroopers seated in a C-17 as it maneuvers to a drop zone for a mass-attack airdrop
A C-17 evacuating 823 passengers out of Kabul on 15 August 2021
C-17 on the runway at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, on 30 January 2009 after landing with landing gear retracted

The McDonnell Douglas/Boeing C-17 Globemaster III is a large military transport aircraft that was developed for the United States Air Force (USAF) from the 1980s to the early 1990s by McDonnell Douglas.

A US Air Force MQ-1 armed with AGM-114 Hellfire missiles

General Atomics MQ-1 Predator

A US Air Force MQ-1 armed with AGM-114 Hellfire missiles
At Paris Air Show 2007
A Predator flies on a simulated Navy aerial reconnaissance flight off the coast of southern California on 5 December 1995.
Predator operators at Balad Camp Anaconda, Iraq, August 2007
Close-up of the Hellfire missile pylon, 2004.
RQ-1A Predator
A shot down RQ-1 Predator in the Museum of Aviation in Belgrade, Serbia
Predator launching a Hellfire missile
An MQ-1B Predator from the 361st Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron takes off 9 July 2008 from Ali Base, Iraq.
Operators of the aircraft.
Three contract maintainers walk an RQ-1 into a shelter at Balad Air Base, Iraq in 2006.
RQ-1 Predator of the Italian Air Force
RQ-1B Predator 3-view drawing
MQ-1B Predator 3-view drawing

The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an American remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) built by General Atomics that was used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

Seal of National Military Establishment (1947–1949), which was later renamed the Department of Defense.

National Security Act of 1947

Law enacting major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II.

Law enacting major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II.

Seal of National Military Establishment (1947–1949), which was later renamed the Department of Defense.
Seal of the Department of the Air Force, established by the National Security Act of 1947.
President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949. Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson leans over the desk. Behind him is Admiral Louis Denfeld, General Omar N. Bradley, and General Hoyt Vandenberg.
The first page of the National Security Act of 1947.
The last page of the National Security Act of 1947. Signed by Speaker of the House of Representatives Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (R-MA), President of the Senate pro tempore Arthur H. Vandenberg (R-MI), and President Harry S. Truman.
President Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947 on board this VC-54C Presidential transport, the first aircraft used for the role of Air Force One.

The act also created the position of the secretary of defense as the head of the NME It established the United States Air Force under the DAF, which worked to separate the Army Air Forces into its own service.

The Yugoslav city of Novi Sad on fire in 1999

NATO bombing of Yugoslavia

Aerial bombing campaign against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia during the Kosovo War.

Aerial bombing campaign against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia during the Kosovo War.

The Yugoslav city of Novi Sad on fire in 1999
Wesley Clark served as the Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR)
Yugoslav Ministry of Defence building damaged during NATO bombing
Ostružnica Bridge hit during Operation Allied Force
People crossing the Danube after the destruction of three bridges in Novi Sad
Yugoslav anti-aircraft fire at night
Wreckage of downed Yugoslav MiG-29 in Ugljevik, Bosnia, on 25 March 1999
Zoltán Dani, the commander 3rd battery of the Yugoslav 250th Missile Brigade, which shot down a NATO F-117 Nighthawk with the S-125 Neva
A MiG-29 decoy which was hit by a malfunctioning rocket but later rebuilt, now at Belgrade Aviation Museum
An F-16CJ Fighting Falcon of the 52nd Fighter Wing after refueling with a KC-135R Stratotanker.
Pre- and post-strike images of destroyed Pristina radar facility.
Canopy of F-117 shot down by the Yugoslav air force on 27 March 1999, near the village of Buđanovci, Serbia
Equipment from a captured US Army peacekeeping patrol on the border between Macedonia and Kosovo, on display at the Military Museum in Belgrade
Map showing sites in Kosovo and southern Central Serbia where NATO used munitions with depleted uranium
Depleted uranium ammunition, fired in FR Yugoslavia in 1999
Post-strike bomb damage assessment photo of Zastava car plant.
Original Avala Tower, one of the symbols of Belgrade, destroyed by NATO bombing
Eternal Flame in Belgrade, memorial to the military and civilian victims of the NATO bombing
A monument to the children killed in the NATO bombing located in Tašmajdan Park, featuring a bronze sculpture of Milica Rakić
German KFOR soldiers patrol southern Kosovo
Warning sign about NATO cluster bombs near ski slopes at Kopaonik
Anti-NATO graffiti on a wall during the bombing of Novi Sad
The Amnesty International described the bombing of the Radio Television of Serbia headquarters as a war crime

United States Air Force F-15s and F-16s flying from Italian airforce bases attacked the defending Yugoslav fighters, mainly MiG-29s, which were in poor condition due to a lack of spare parts and maintenance.