United States Capitol dome

Capitol domedomea dome modeled on the Pantheondome of the U.S. Capitolnew domepartially built domeU.S. CapitolU.S. Capitol domeUnited States CapitolUnited States Capitol building
The United States Capitol dome is the dome situated above the United States Capitol which reaches upwards to 288 ft in height and 96 ft in diameter.wikipedia
84 Related Articles

United States Capitol

CapitolU.S. CapitolCapitol Building
The United States Capitol dome is the dome situated above the United States Capitol which reaches upwards to 288 ft in height and 96 ft in diameter.
The original building was completed in 1800 and was subsequently expanded, particularly with the addition of the massive dome, and expanded chambers for the bicameral legislature, the House of Representatives in the south wing and the Senate in the north wing.

Adrian Janes

The iron for the dome was cast by the foundry of Janes, Fowler, Kirtland & Company, owned by Adrian Janes in the Bronx, New York.
Adrian Janes (February 4, 1798 - March 2, 1869) was the owner of the iron foundry Janes, Kirtland & Co. in The Bronx, New York, the company which created iron work for the Bow Bridge in Central Park, the railings of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the Capitol dome of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

United States Capitol rotunda

rotundaCapitol rotundaRotunda of the U.S. Capitol
This included the building of a double-dome structure, a stone, brick, and wooden interior dome to rise 96 ft above the rotunda floor (matching the dimensions of the Pantheon), and a wooden exterior dome covered in copper that would rise to 140 ft. Set at the crown of the exterior dome was an oculus 24 ft wide, which provided illumination to the rotunda floor below.
It is located below the Capitol dome, built 1857–1866; the later construction also extended the height of the rotunda walls.

Charles Bulfinch

BulfinchBulfinch Streeterected
The third Architect of the Capitol, Charles Bulfinch, altered the exterior profile of the plans still further by increasing the dome's height, which he later wrote was at the insistence of the President and Congress.
Bulfinch split his career between his native Boston, Massachusetts and Washington, D.C., where he served as Commissioner of Public Building and built the intermediate United States Capitol rotunda and dome.

Statue of Freedom

FreedomColumbia" on the Capitol domeColumbia, the statue
By December 2, 1863, Walter was able to set the Statue of Freedom atop the dome.
The Statue of Freedom, also known as Armed Freedom or simply Freedom, is a bronze statue designed by Thomas Crawford (1814–1857) that, since 1863, has crowned the dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. Originally named Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace, a U.S. government publication now states that the statue "is officially known as the Statue of Freedom". The statue depicts a female figure bearing a military helmet and holding a sheathed sword in her right hand and a laurel wreath and shield in her left.

Edward Clark (architect)

Edward Clark Edward Clark
His replacement, Edward Clark, assumed the role of finishing the last aspects of the dome.
In 1851, Walter was appointed the Architect of the Capitol and charged with designing and building the United States Capitol dome and the north (Senate) and south (House) wings of the United States Capitol.

Dome

domessaucer domedomed
The United States Capitol dome is the dome situated above the United States Capitol which reaches upwards to 288 ft in height and 96 ft in diameter.

Thomas Ustick Walter

Thomas U. WalterThomas Walter
The dome was designed by Thomas U. Walter, the fourth Architect of the Capitol, and constructed between 1855 and 1866 at a cost of $1,047,291 (equivalent to $ in ).

Architect of the Capitol

Architect of the U.S. CapitolSuperintendent of the U.S. Capitolassistant architect
The dome was designed by Thomas U. Walter, the fourth Architect of the Capitol, and constructed between 1855 and 1866 at a cost of $1,047,291 (equivalent to $ in ).

Cast iron

cast-ironcastiron
The dome is not stone, but rather cast iron carefully painted to appear to be made of the same stone as the main capitol building.

The Bronx

BronxBronx, New YorkThe Bronx, New York
The iron for the dome was cast by the foundry of Janes, Fowler, Kirtland & Company, owned by Adrian Janes in the Bronx, New York.

Origin (mathematics)

originzero pointcoordinate origin
The dome marks the origin on Washington, D.C. street maps.

United States Secretary of State

Secretary of StateU.S. Secretary of StateUS Secretary of State
The origin of the first dome began with the Capitol design contest sponsored by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, at the behest of President George Washington, in 1792.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
The origin of the first dome began with the Capitol design contest sponsored by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, at the behest of President George Washington, in 1792.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. Presidentpresidential
The origin of the first dome began with the Capitol design contest sponsored by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, at the behest of President George Washington, in 1792.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
The origin of the first dome began with the Capitol design contest sponsored by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, at the behest of President George Washington, in 1792.

William Thornton

Dr. William Thornton
The winner of the contest, Doctor William Thornton, called for a dome in his original design for the building.

Pantheon, Rome

PantheonPantheon in RomeRoman Pantheon
Most vividly, Thornton drew upon the Roman Pantheon for inspiration with the Neoclassical dome and associated portico.

Neoclassical architecture

NeoclassicalClassical Revivalneo-classical
Most vividly, Thornton drew upon the Roman Pantheon for inspiration with the Neoclassical dome and associated portico.

Portico

tetrastylepronaoshexastyle
Most vividly, Thornton drew upon the Roman Pantheon for inspiration with the Neoclassical dome and associated portico.

Benjamin Henry Latrobe

Benjamin LatrobeLatrobeBenjamin H. Latrobe
Thornton's replacement, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the second Architect of the Capitol, altered Thornton's design plan on the exterior by adding an octagonal drum to visually separate the bottom of the dome from the top of the building's pediment.

Pediment

pedimentspedimentedtriangular pediment
Thornton's replacement, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the second Architect of the Capitol, altered Thornton's design plan on the exterior by adding an octagonal drum to visually separate the bottom of the dome from the top of the building's pediment.

Oculus

oculicircular windowbull's eyes windows
This included the building of a double-dome structure, a stone, brick, and wooden interior dome to rise 96 ft above the rotunda floor (matching the dimensions of the Pantheon), and a wooden exterior dome covered in copper that would rise to 140 ft. Set at the crown of the exterior dome was an oculus 24 ft wide, which provided illumination to the rotunda floor below.

Copper

CuCu 2+ cupric
For more than two decades, the green copper dome of the Capitol greeted visitors to the nation's capitol, until the 1850s.

United States territorial acquisitions

westward expansionwestward expansion of the United Statesexpanded westward
Due to the growth of the United States and the expansion and addition of new states, the size of the United States Congress had grown accordingly and pushed the limits of the capacity of the Capitol.