United States Census Bureau

Census headquarters in Suitland, Maryland
U.S. Census Bureau Regions and Divisions
U.S. Census Bureau Regional Office Boundaries
Census Bureau employees tabulate data using one of the agency's UNIVAC computers, c. 1960.

Principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy.

- United States Census Bureau

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United States census

Census that is legally mandated by the U.S. Constitution, and takes place every 10 years.

Census that is legally mandated by the U.S. Constitution, and takes place every 10 years.

A woman with a Hollerith pantograph punch. The keyboard is for the 1940 U.S. census population card.
This 1940 Census publicity photo shows a census worker in Fairbanks, Alaska. The dog musher remains out of earshot to maintain confidentiality.
Census outreach flyers hang at Sure We Can - redemption center in Bushwick, Brooklyn - 2020
Census regional marketing logo in Minnesota.
US Census Bureau Population Regions

The United States Census Bureau (officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is responsible for the United States census.

1930 United States census

The United States census of 1930, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 census.

Midwestern United States

Divisions of the Midwest by the U.S. Census Bureau into East North Central and West North Central, separated largely by the Mississippi River.
Scotts Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska
The Driftless Area as viewed from Wildcat Mountain State Park in Vernon County, Wisconsin
Flint Hills grasslands of Kansas
Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota
Prairie in Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa
Monks Mound, located at the Cahokia Mounds near Collinsville, Illinois, is the largest Pre-Columbian earthwork in America north of Mesoamerica and a World Heritage Site
Winnebago family (1852)
Young Oglala Lakota girl in front of tipi with puppy beside her, probably on or near Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota
Cumulus clouds hover above a yellowish prairie at Badlands National Park, South Dakota, native lands to the Sioux.
c. 1681 map of Marquette and Jolliet's 1673 expedition
Beaver hunting grounds, the basis of the fur trade
The state cessions that eventually allowed for the creation of the territories north and southwest of the River Ohio
Northwest Territory 1787
Louisiana Purchase 1803
Ohio River near Rome, Ohio
Lake Michigan is shared by four Midwestern states: Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin.
The Upper Mississippi River near Harpers Ferry, Iowa
An animation depicting when United States territories and states forbade or allowed slavery, 1789–1861
1855 Free-State poster
A map of various Underground Railroad routes
Minneapolis, Minnesota is on the Mississippi River
Omaha, Nebraska, is on the Missouri River
Cincinnati, Ohio is on the Ohio River
Distribution of Americans claiming German Ancestry by county in 2018
German population density in the United States, 1870 census
A pastoral farm scene near Traverse City, Michigan, with a classic American red barn
Central Iowa cornfield in June
Standing wheat in Kansas, part of America's Breadbasket
Soybean fields at Applethorpe Farm, north of Hallsville in Ross County, Ohio
The Chicago Board of Trade Building a National Historic Landmark
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland
Mount Rushmore is located in the Black Hills of South Dakota.
The Milwaukee Art Museum is located on Lake Michigan.
The first local meeting of the new Republican Party took place here in Ripon, Wisconsin on March 20, 1854.
Midwestern Governors by party
Midwestern U.S. Senators by party for the 117th Congress
Midwestern U.S. Representatives by party for the 117th Congress

The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the Midwest or the American Midwest, is one of four census regions of the United States Census Bureau (also known as "Region 2").

Northeastern United States

Geographical region of the United States.

Geographical region of the United States.

New York, the most populous city in the Northeast and all of the United States
Philadelphia, the second most populous city in the Northeast and the sixth most populated city in the United States
Boston, the most populated city in Massachusetts and New England and the third most populated city in the Northeast
Embarkation of the Pilgrims, Robert Walter Weir (1857)
Penn's Treaty with the Indians, Benjamin West (1772)
The High Point Monument as seen from Lake Marcia at High Point, Sussex County, the highest elevation in New Jersey at 1803 ft above sea level
Cape Cod Bay, a leading tourist destination in Massachusetts
The Palisades along the Hudson River, New Jersey
U.S. Route 220 as it passes through Lamar Township, Pennsylvania
Downtown Providence, Rhode Island

The Northeast is one of the four regions defined by the United States Census Bureau for the collection and analysis of statistics.

The distribution of world population in 1994

Population

Population typically refers to the number of people in a single area, whether it be a city or town, region, country, continent, or the world.

Population typically refers to the number of people in a single area, whether it be a city or town, region, country, continent, or the world.

The distribution of world population in 1994
Key
The years taken for every billion people to be added to the world's population, and the years that population was reached (with future estimates).
PRB 2017 Data Sheet Largest Populations

According to the United States Census Bureau the world's population was about 7.5 billion in 2019 and that the 7 billion number was surpassed on 12 March 2012.

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Americans

Americans are the citizens and nationals of the United States of America.

Americans are the citizens and nationals of the United States of America.

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Apple pie and baseball are icons of American culture.
The First Baptist Church in America in Providence, Rhode Island.
The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. is the largest Catholic church in the United States.
The Salt Lake Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah is the largest LDS temple.
Holy Trinity Orthodox Cathedral in Chicago's Ukrainian Village.
Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist church in Oak Park, Illinois
Touro Synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island is America's oldest surviving synagogue.
The Islamic Center of America in Dearborn, Michigan is the largest mosque in North America.
Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, California is one of the largest Buddhist temples in the Western Hemisphere.
Hindu Temple in Malibu, California.
The Bahá'í House of Worship, in Wilmette, Illinois.
The Jain Center of Greater Phoenix (JCGP) in Phoenix, Arizona.

Six races are officially recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau for statistical purposes: White, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, and people of two or more races.

West Coast of the United States

Coastline along which the Western United States meets the North Pacific Ocean.

Coastline along which the Western United States meets the North Pacific Ocean.

After the 2018 elections, the Democratic Party controlled all but one coastal seat in the United States House of Representatives
Los Angeles is the largest city on the West Coast and second-largest in the United States

The term typically refers to the contiguous U.S. states of California, Oregon, and Washington, but sometimes includes Alaska and Hawaii, especially by the United States Census Bureau as a U.S. geographic division.

Regional definitions vary from source to source. The states shown in dark red are always included, while the striped states are usually considered part of the same region called the Mountain States.

Mountain states

Regional definitions vary from source to source. The states shown in dark red are always included, while the striped states are usually considered part of the same region called the Mountain States.
The Teton Mountain Range in Wyoming, a subset of the Rocky Mountains
Map of the Rocky Mountains of western North America.
The bottom of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River in Arizona
Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado
Snow on the Great Basin Desert of Nevada
The Painted Desert in northeastern Arizona
Mount Elbert in the Sawatch Range of Colorado is the highest peak of the Rocky Mountains and the Mountain States.
Downtown Phoenix
Downtown Denver
The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta
The skyline of Salt Lake City
Evening comes to Tucson
Albuquerque skyline with the Sandia Mountains in the distance
The skyline of Colorado Springs with the Front Range in the background
The Idaho State Capitol in Boise
Bell Rock near Sedona, Arizona
Tombstone, Arizona
Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado
The Cliff Palace in Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado
Hanging Lake near Glenwood Springs, Colorado.
The rugged San Juan Mountains in Colorado
Borah Peak is the highest point in the state of Idaho.
Redfish Lake in Idaho
Shoshone Falls on the Snake River in Idaho, 1898
The Absaroka Range of Montana.
Autumn comes to Chief Mountain in Glacier National Park in Montana
Feral horses in the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range in Montana
Saint Mary Lake in Glacier National Park in Montana
Stella Lake in Great Basin National Park in Nevada
The Nevada shore of Lake Tahoe
Downtown Reno, Nevada
Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe, New Mexico
The Taos Pueblo of New Mexico.
The Very Large Array near Socorro, New Mexico
Moonrise at White Sands National Park in New Mexico
Sunset at Delicate Arch in Arches National Park in Utah
The Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah
Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park in Utah

The Mountain States (also known as the Mountain West or the Interior West) form one of the nine geographic divisions of the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau.

Unemployment rate as a percentage of the civilian labor force in the United States according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics showing the variation across the states

Current Population Survey

Unemployment rate as a percentage of the civilian labor force in the United States according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics showing the variation across the states

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 60,000 U.S. households conducted by the United States Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Southern United States

Geographic and cultural region of the United States of America.

Geographic and cultural region of the United States of America.

Texas Hill Country
Bluegrass region, Kentucky
Glass Mountains, Oklahoma
North Carolina's Appalachian Mountains
Field of yellow wildflowers in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana
Pearl River backwater in Mississippi
Misty Bluff along the Buffalo River, Ozark Mountains, Arkansas
Tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland
Cherry River in West Virginia
The highlands of Grayson County in Southwest Virginia
1st Maryland Regiment holding the line at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in North Carolina, 1781
The siege of Yorktown prompted Great Britain's surrender in North America during the American Revolutionary War, 1781
Slaves on a South Carolina plantation (The Old Plantation, circa 1790)
Grove Plantation in Tallahassee, Florida. Known officially as the Call/Collins House at the Grove. Built circa 1840.
Horse race meeting at Jacksonville, Alabama, 1841
Historic Southern United States. The states in light red were considered "border states", and gave varying degrees of support to the Southern cause although they remained in the Union. This illustration depicts the original, trans-Allegheny borders of Virginia, and thus does not show West Virginia (which separated from Virginia in 1863) separately. Although members of the Five Tribes in Indian Territory (today part of Oklahoma) aligned themselves with the Confederacy, the region is not shaded because at the time it was a territory, not a state.
Atlanta's railroad roundhouse in ruins shortly after the end of the Civil War
An African American family, photo-graphed by O'Pierre Havens, circa 1868
A Home on the Mississippi, by Currier and Ives, 1871
Child laborers in Bluffton, South Carolina, 1913
An illustration from Houston: Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea, 1913
Photo of sharecropper family in Walker County, Alabama, circa 1937
Naval Air Station Miami, circa 1942–43
Street musicians in Maynardville, Tennessee, photographed in 1935
Alabama plays Texas in American football for the 2010 BCS National Championship Game
Houston vs Texas face-off during the 2013 Lone Star Series in the American League West division of Major League Baseball
The start of the 2015 Daytona 500, the biggest race in NASCAR, at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida
A rally against school integration in Little Rock, 1959.
U.S. president Lyndon B. Johnson signs the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Bill Clinton, newly elected Governor of Arkansas speaking with Jimmy Carter in 1978. Carter and Clinton were both Southern Democrats and elected to the presidencies in 1976 and 1992.
Racial segregation was required by state laws in the South and other U.S. states until 1964.
Dallas
Houston
Washington, D.C.
Miami
Atlanta
Tampa
Charlotte
Nashville
Louisville
New Orleans
University of Texas at Austin
Virginia Tech
University of Miami
Rice University

However, the United States Census Bureau continues to define them as in the South with regard to Census regions.