United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressionalCongressmanUS CongressU.S. CongressmanThe CongressCongressescongressmenCongress of the United States
The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.wikipedia
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United States Capitol

CapitolU.S. CapitolCapitol Building
The Congress meets in the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C..
The United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building, is the home of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

United States Senate

SenatorSenateU.S. Senator
The legislature consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate.
The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives — the lower chamber — comprises the legislature of the United States.

Federal government of the United States

federal governmentfederalU.S. government
The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.
The federal government is composed of three distinct branches: legislative, executive, and judicial, whose powers are vested by the U.S. Constitution in the Congress, the President, and the federal courts, respectively.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rican🇵🇷PR
The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members.
As it is not a state, Puerto Rico does not have a vote in the United States Congress, which governs the territory with full jurisdiction under the Puerto Rico Federal Relations Act of 1950.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
Article One of the United States Constitution states, "All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives."
Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress.

United States Virgin Islands

U.S. Virgin IslandsVirgin IslandsUS Virgin Islands
The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members.
The last and only proposed Constitution, adopted by the Fifth Constitutional Convention of the U.S. Virgin Islands in 2009, was rejected by the U.S. Congress in 2010, which urged the convention to reconvene to address the concerns Congress and the Obama Administration had with the proposed document.

United States Census

censusU.S. CensusUS Census
Congressional districts are apportioned to states by population using the United States Census results, provided that each state has at least one congressional representative.
The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States ... according to their respective Numbers ... . The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years."

U.S. state

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Congressional districts are apportioned to states by population using the United States Census results, provided that each state has at least one congressional representative.
States and their residents are represented in the United States Congress, a bicameral legislature consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. Presidentpresidential
The Senate ratifies treaties and approves presidential appointments while the House initiates revenue-raising bills.
The president is further empowered to grant federal pardons and reprieves, and to convene and adjourn either or both houses of Congress under extraordinary circumstances.

Congress

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The term Congress can also refer to a particular meeting of the legislature.
Subsequent to the use of congress as the name for the legislature of the U.S. federal government (beginning in 1789), the term has been adopted by many nations to refer to their national legislatures.

American Samoa

🇦🇸SamoaAS
The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members.
In 1930, the U.S. Congress sent a committee to investigate the status of American Samoa, led by Americans who had a part in the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii.

Congress of the Confederation

CongressConfederation CongressContinental Congress
The Congress was created by the Constitution of the United States and first met in 1789, replacing in its legislative function the Congress of the Confederation.
The Congress of the Confederation was succeeded by the Congress of the United States as provided for in the new Constitution of the United States, proposed September 17, 1787, in Philadelphia and ratified by the states through 1787 to 1788 and even into 1789 and 1790.

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia Convention1787 Constitutional Convention
Government powerlessness led to the Convention of 1787 which proposed a revised constitution with a two–chamber or bicameral congress.
The most contentious disputes revolved around composition and election of the upper legislative house in the future bicameral Congress, to be known as the Senate, how "proportional representation" was to be defined (whether to include slaves or other property), whether to divide the executive power between three persons or invest the power into a single chief executive to be called the President, how to elect the President, how long his term was to be and whether he could run for reelection, what offenses should be impeachable, the nature of a fugitive slave clause, whether to allow the abolition of the slave trade, and whether judges should be chosen by the legislature or executive.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
Some activists joined the Anti-Administration Party that James Madison and Thomas Jefferson were forming about 1790–91 to oppose policies of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton; it soon became the Democratic-Republican Party or the Jeffersonian Republican Party and began the era of the First Party System.
From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System.

Northern Mariana Islands

Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana IslandsNorthern Mariana IslanderNorthern Marianas
The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members.
The commonwealth does not have voting representation in the United States Congress, but, since 2009, has been represented in the U.S. House of Representatives by a delegate who may participate in debate but may not vote on the floor.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
Although not legally mandated, in practice since the 19th century, Congress members are typically affiliated with the Republican Party or with the Democratic Party and only rarely with a third party or independents.
In 2018, Democratic congressional candidate Tom Malinowski described the party:

National Archives and Records Administration

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The historical records of the House of Representatives and the Senate are maintained by the Center for Legislative Archives, which is a part of the National Archives and Records Administration.
Congress established the National Archives Establishment in 1934 to centralize federal record keeping, with the Archivist of the United States as chief administrator.

Conservative coalition

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During this time, Republicans and conservative southern Democrats formed the Conservative Coalition.
The conservative coalition was an unofficial Congressional coalition bringing together a conservative majority of the Republican Party and the conservative (mostly Southern) wing of the Democratic Party.

Lobbying in the United States

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Lobbying became a big factor despite the 1971 Federal Election Campaign Act.
Lobbying in the United States describes paid activity in which special interests hire well-connected professional advocates, often lawyers, to argue for specific legislation in decision-making bodies such as the United States Congress.

Watergate scandal

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The Watergate Scandal had a powerful effect of waking up a somewhat dormant Congress which investigated presidential wrongdoing and coverups; the scandal "substantially reshaped" relations between the branches of government, suggested political scientist Bruce J. Schulman.
After the five burglars were caught, and the conspiracy was discovered—chiefly through the work of a few journalists, Congressional staffers and an election-finance watchdog official —Watergate was investigated by the United States Congress.

History of the United States Republican Party

Republican PartyRepublicanRepublicans
The Gilded Age (1877–1901) was marked by Republican dominance of Congress.
During the American Civil War, the party passed major legislation in Congress to promote rapid modernization, including a national banking system, high tariffs, the first temporary income tax (subsequently ruled unconstitutional in Springer v. United States), many excise taxes, paper money issued without backing ("greenbacks"), a huge national debt, homestead laws, railroads and aid to education and agriculture.

States' rights

states rightsstate's rightsstate sovereignty
The watershed event was the Civil War which resolved the slavery issue and unified the nation under federal authority, but weakened the power of states rights.
In 1828, the Congress passed protective tariffs to benefit trade in the northern states, but that were detrimental to the South.

United States Virgin Islands's at-large congressional district

At-largeat-large congressional districtU.S. Virgin Islands
In 1971, a delegate for the District of Columbia was authorized, and in 1972 new delegate positions were established for U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam.
The territory does not have a voting member of Congress, but does elect a delegate who can participate in debates.

Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Sixteenth Amendment16th AmendmentSixteenth
The Sixteenth Amendment in 1913 extended congressional power of taxation to include income taxes without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.
The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states on the basis of population.

Appropriations bill (United States)

appropriationsappropriations billappropriation
Generally, both the Senate and the House of Representatives have equal legislative authority, although only the House may originate revenue and appropriation bills.
In the United States Congress, an appropriations bill is legislation to appropriate federal funds to specific federal government departments, agencies and programs.