United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independencedeclared independenceIndependenceUS Declaration of IndependenceThe Declaration of IndependenceAmerican independenceDeclaration of Independence of the United StatesDeclaration
The United States Declaration of Independence is the pronouncement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1776.wikipedia
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John Locke

LockeLockeanJ Locke
English political theorist John Locke is usually cited as one of the primary influences, a man whom Jefferson called one of "the three greatest men that have ever lived".
His contributions to classical republicanism and liberal theory are reflected in the United States Declaration of Independence.

Pauline Maier

Maier, PaulinePauline Alice Rubbelke Maier
Historian Pauline Maier identifies more than ninety such declarations that were issued throughout the Thirteen Colonies from April to July 1776.
Popular support for the Declaration of Independence was built on how much was known and how widely the newspapers circulated.

William Williams (Connecticut politician)

William WilliamsWilliam Williams (Continental Congress)
William Williams (April 23, 1731 – August 2, 1811) was a merchant, and a delegate for Connecticut to the Continental Congress in 1776, and a signatory of the Declaration of Independence.

Self-evidence

self-evidentself-evidentlyevident
A famous claim of the self-evidence of a moral truth is in the United States Declaration of Independence, which states, "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."; philosophically, these propositions' self-evidence is debatable.

Syng inkstand

The Syng inkstand used at the signing was also used at the signing of the United States Constitution in 1787.
The Syng inkstand is a silver inkstand used during the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the United States Constitution in 1787.

John Dunlap

Dunlap
After Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration on July 4, a handwritten copy was sent a few blocks away to the printing shop of John Dunlap.
John Dunlap (1747 – November 27, 1812) was an Irish printer who printed the first copies of the United States Declaration of Independence and was one of the most successful Irish/American printers of his era.

Francis Lightfoot Lee

Francis L. LeeFrancis Lightfoot Lee I
He was a signer of the Articles of Confederation and the Declaration of Independence as a representative of Virginia.

Delaware Colony

DelawareLower CountiesLower Counties on the Delaware
The declaration was signed by representatives from New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Virginia

Commonwealth of VirginiaVAState of Virginia
Jefferson himself was a prominent Virginia slave holder, having owned hundreds of slaves.
Another Virginian, Thomas Jefferson, drew upon Mason's work in drafting the national Declaration of Independence.

Constitution of the United Kingdom

British constitutionconstitutionEnglish constitution
This tax dispute was part of a larger divergence between British and American interpretations of the British Constitution and the extent of Parliament's authority in the colonies.
Together with northern colonies grievances over taxation without representation, this led to the American Revolution and declaration of independence in 1776.

Joseph Hewes

After finishing his apprenticeship he earned himself a good name and a strong reputation, which would serve him well in becoming one of the most famous signers of the Declaration of Independence for North Carolina, along with William Hooper and John Penn.

Royal assent

assentassentedassented to
In the United States Declaration of Independence, colonists complained that George III "has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good [and] has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them."

Charters of Freedom

Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of RightsRotunda of the Charters of Freedom
In 1952, the engrossed Declaration was transferred to the National Archives and is now on permanent display at the National Archives in the "Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom".
These documents are the United States Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

Consent of the governed

consentcommon consentconsent of the Chinese people
The Rhodesian declaration of independence is based on the American one, as well, ratified in November 1965, although it omits the phrases "all men are created equal" and "the consent of the governed".
"Consent of the governed" is a phrase found in the United States Declaration of Independence.

Timothy Matlack

American ScribeMatlack
It was probably engrossed (that is, carefully handwritten) by clerk Timothy Matlack.
Matlack was known for his excellent penmanship and was chosen to inscribe the original United States Declaration of Independence on vellum.

Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

Marquis de LafayetteLafayetteGeneral Lafayette
Lafayette prepared its key drafts, working closely in Paris with his friend Thomas Jefferson.
This document was inspired by the United States Declaration of Independence and invoked natural law to establish basic principles of the democratic nation-state.

Province of Pennsylvania

PennsylvaniaPennsylvania ColonyPennsylvania Provincial Assembly
The declaration was signed by representatives from New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Mary Katherine Goddard

Mary GoddardKatherine GoddardMary K. Goddard
In 1777, Congress commissioned Mary Katherine Goddard to print that listed the signers of the Declaration, unlike the Dunlap broadside.
She was the second printer to print the Declaration of Independence.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Washington had the Declaration read to his troops in New York City on July 9, with thousands of British troops on ships in the harbor.
The new One World Trade Center is the tallest skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere and the sixth-tallest building in the world by pinnacle height, with its spire reaching a symbolic 1776 ft in reference to the year of U.S. independence.

Pennsylvania Evening Post

Benjamin TowneThe Pennsylvania Evening Post
The first formal public readings of the document took place on July 8, in Philadelphia (by John Nixon in the yard of Independence Hall), Trenton, New Jersey, and Easton, Pennsylvania; the first newspaper to publish it was the Pennsylvania Evening Post on July 6.
The Pennsylvania Evening Post, a Philadelphia newspaper printed by Benjamin Towne from 1775 to 1784, was the first newspaper to print the United States Declaration of Independence, which it published on July 6, 1776.

Jeremy Bentham

BenthamBenthamiteBentham, Jeremy
Lind's pamphlet had an anonymous attack on the concept of natural rights written by Jeremy Bentham, an argument that he repeated during the French Revolution.
When the American colonies published their Declaration of Independence in July 1776, the British government did not issue any official response but instead secretly commissioned London lawyer and pamphleteer John Lind to publish a rebuttal.

Rhodesia's Unilateral Declaration of Independence

Unilateral Declaration of IndependenceUDIunilaterally declared independence
The Rhodesian declaration of independence is based on the American one, as well, ratified in November 1965, although it omits the phrases "all men are created equal" and "the consent of the governed".
The culmination of a protracted dispute between the British and Rhodesian governments regarding the terms under which the latter could become fully independent, it was the first unilateral break from the United Kingdom by one of its colonies since the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776.

Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

Declaration of the Rights of ManDeclaration of the Rights of Man and CitizenDeclaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen
The inspiration and content of the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789) emerged largely from the ideals of the American Revolution.
The 1789 Declaration, together with the 1215 Magna Carta, the 1689 English Bill of Rights, the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence, and the 1789 United States Bill of Rights, inspired in large part the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Proclamation of Rebellion

declared Massachusetts to be in rebelliondeclared traitorsKing's Proclamation of Rebellion
They were disappointed in late 1775 when the king rejected Congress's second petition, issued a Proclamation of Rebellion, and announced before Parliament on October 26 that he was considering "friendly offers of foreign assistance" to suppress the rebellion.
When it became clear that the king was not inclined to act as a conciliator, colonial attachment to the Empire was weakened, and a movement towards declaring independence became a reality, culminating in the United States Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.

Declaration of Independence (Trumbull)

Declaration of IndependenceDeclaration of Independence'' (Trumbull)famous painting
In 1817, Congress commissioned John Trumbull's famous painting of the signers, which was exhibited to large crowds before being installed in the Capitol.
Declaration of Independence is a 12 by oil-on-canvas painting by American John Trumbull depicting the presentation of the draft of the Declaration of Independence to Congress.