A report on United States Department of the Navy

Seal of the U.S. Department of the Navy from 1879 to 1957.
Navy Department, mainly the Office of the Secretary, organizational structure (2006)

One of the three military departments within the Department of Defense of the United States of America.

- United States Department of the Navy
Seal of the U.S. Department of the Navy from 1879 to 1957.

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United States Secretary of the Navy

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The secretary of the Navy (or SECNAV) is a statutory officer and the head (chief executive officer) of the Department of the Navy, a military department (component organization) within the United States Department of Defense.

Emblem of the United States Navy

United States Navy

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Maritime service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the eight uniformed services of the United States.

Maritime service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the eight uniformed services of the United States.

Emblem of the United States Navy
USS Constellation vs L'Insurgente during the Quasi-War
USS Constitution vs HMS Guerriere during the War of 1812
A carte de visite of a U.S. Navy lieutenant during the Civil War
The Great White Fleet demonstrating U.S. naval power in 1907; it was proof that the U.S. Navy had blue-water capability.
Columbia, personification of the United States, wearing a warship bearing the words "World Power" as her "Easter bonnet" on the cover of Puck, 6 April 1901
Battleship USS Idaho (BB-42) shelling Okinawa on 1 April 1945.
USS George Washington (SSBN-598), a ballistic missile submarine
U.S. Navy officers aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) monitor defense systems during early 2010s maritime security operations exercises
U.S. Navy patrol boat near Kuwait Naval Base in 2009
The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA-6), launched in 2012.
Organization of the United States Navy within the Department of Defense
Simplified flowchart of the U.S. Navy command structure
Areas of responsibility for each of the United States Navy fleets. Tenth Fleet serves as the numbered fleet for U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and therefore is not shown.
USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) docking at the U.S. Navy base in Yokosuka, Japan
A Marine F/A-18 from VMFA-451 preparing to launch from USS Coral Sea (CV-43)
A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter preparing to land on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD-1)
Navy SEALs at one of the entrances to the Zhawar Kili cave complex
U.S. Navy warrant officer specialty insignias
Map of naval bases in the United States
Underwater Demolition Team members using the casting technique from a speeding boat
Combat Camera Underwater Photo Team – A U.S. Navy diver during underwater photography training off the coast of Guantanamo Bay
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USS Nimitz, a
USS Bataan (LHD-5), a
USS San Antonio (LPD-17), a
USS Port Royal (CG-73), a
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), a Zumwalt-class stealth guided missile destroyer
USS Independence (LCS-2), a Littoral combat ship
USS Freedom (LCS-1) underway in special naval camouflage
USS Warrior (MCM-10) in port
USS Typhoon (PC-5) departing Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek in Virginia
USS Kentucky (SSBN-737), an ballistic missile submarine
USS Virginia (SSN-774), a attack submarine
Four Navy F/A-18F Super Hornets
U.S. Navy MH-60R maritime strike helicopter assigned to the HSM-78 Blue Hawks aboard the carrier USS Carl Vinson
Aviation Ordnancemen loading GBU-12 bombs in 2005
U.S. naval jack
First navy jack
Naval Aviator Badge
Submarine Officer badge
Surface Warfare Officer Insignia

The U.S. Navy is part of the Department of the Navy, alongside the U.S. Marine Corps, which is its coequal sister service.

United States Department of Defense

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Executive branch department of the federal government charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government directly related to national security and the United States Armed Forces.

Executive branch department of the federal government charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government directly related to national security and the United States Armed Forces.

President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949
Department of Defense organizational chart (December 2013)
2008 OSD organizational chart
Joint Chiefs of Staff/Joint Staff organizational chart
Combatant command areas of responsibility
Defense Spending as a Percent of GDP (1792–2017)
Total United States Defense Outlays 1962–2024, $millions (2019-2024 estimated)
Defense Intelligence Agency
National Security Agency
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
National Reconnaissance Office
Department of the Army
Department of the Navy
Department of the Air Force
U.S. Army
U.S. Marine Corps
U.S. Navy
U.S. Air Force
U.S. Space Force

Beneath the Department of Defense are three subordinate military departments: the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force.

Seal of National Military Establishment (1947–1949), which was later renamed the Department of Defense.

National Security Act of 1947

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Law enacting major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II.

Law enacting major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II.

Seal of National Military Establishment (1947–1949), which was later renamed the Department of Defense.
Seal of the Department of the Air Force, established by the National Security Act of 1947.
President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949. Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson leans over the desk. Behind him is Admiral Louis Denfeld, General Omar N. Bradley, and General Hoyt Vandenberg.
The first page of the National Security Act of 1947.
The last page of the National Security Act of 1947. Signed by Speaker of the House of Representatives Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (R-MA), President of the Senate pro tempore Arthur H. Vandenberg (R-MI), and President Harry S. Truman.
President Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947 on board this VC-54C Presidential transport, the first aircraft used for the role of Air Force One.

The act merged the Department of the Army (renamed from the Department of War), the Department of the Navy, and the newly established Department of the Air Force (DAF) into the National Military Establishment (NME).

Emblem of the United States Marine Corps

United States Marine Corps

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Maritime land force service branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations through combined arms, implementing its own infantry, artillery, aerial, and special operations forces.

Maritime land force service branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations through combined arms, implementing its own infantry, artillery, aerial, and special operations forces.

Emblem of the United States Marine Corps
U.S. Marines from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit training
Marines from the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit depart USS Tarawa (LHA-1), using both a Landing Craft Utility and CH-53E "Super Stallion" helicopters, during amphibious operations in Kuwait, 2003.
Maj. Samuel Nicholas, first Commandant of the Marine Corps, was nominated to lead the Continental Marines by John Adams in November 1775.
British and U.S. troops garrisoned aboard Hornet and Penguin exchanging small arms musket fire with Tristan da Cuna in the background during the final engagement between British and U.S. forces in the War of 1812
The Final Stand at Bladensburg, Maryland, 24 August 1814
Five USMC privates with fixed bayonets, and their NCO with his sword at the Washington Navy Yard, 1864
Georges Scott, American Marines in Belleau Wood, 1918
Former French Foreign Legion Lieutenant, and U.S. Marine Corps officer Peter J. Ortiz, who served in the European theater, often behind enemy lines
Photograph of the Marine Corps War Memorial, which depicts the second U.S. flag-raising atop Mount Suribachi, on Iwo Jima. The memorial is modeled on Joe Rosenthal's famous Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima.
F4U Corsairs providing close air support to Marines of the 1st Marine Division fighting Chinese forces in North Korea, December 1950
U.S. Marines of "G" Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines in action during Operation Allen Brook in South Vietnam, 1968
Beirut Memorial at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune
U.S. Marines from 1st Battalion, 7th Marines entering a palace in Baghdad in 2003
U.S. Marines dismounting from an Assault Amphibious Vehicle in Djibouti
Organization of the United States Marine Corps
Marine Raiders conducting CQB training
Opha Johnson (far right) in 1946, with Katherine Towle (far left). They are looking at Opha Johnson's uniform being worn by PFC Muriel Albert.
Two of the first female graduates of the School of Infantry-East's Infantry Training Battalion course, 2013
Marine recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego
U.S. Marines in training
An illustration of U.S. Marines in various uniform setups. From left to right: A U.S. Marine in a Marine Corps Combat Utility Uniform with full combat load circa 2003, a U.S. Marine in a (full) blue dress uniform, a U.S. Marine officer in a service uniform, and a U.S. Marine general in an evening dress uniform.
The Eagle, Globe and Anchor along with the U.S. flag, the Marine Corps flag and the Commandant's flag
A recruiting poster making use of the "Teufel Hunden" [sic] nickname
Marines training in martial arts
Marines firing MEU(SOC) pistols while garrisoned aboard a ship
Marine Amphibious Assault Vehicles emerge from the surf onto the sand of Freshwater Beach, Australia
Marine parachutists jumping from an MV-22 Osprey at 10,000 feet
A Marine Corps F-35B, the vertical-landing version of the F-35 Lightning II multirole fighter landing aboard USS Wasp (LHD-1)
Assault Amphibious Vehicles approaching the well deck of USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6)
A Marine and sailor training with rifles in Iraq
A soldier from the 1st Infantry Regiment provides security for a joint Army-Marine patrol in Rawa in 2006. The shoulder sleeve insignia has the logo of the 2nd Marine Division.
Marines unloading CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy

The Marine Corps has been part of the U.S. Department of the Navy since 30 June 1834 with its sister service, the United States Navy.

United States Secretary of Defense

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Head of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the U.S. Armed Forces, and is a high ranking member of the federal cabinet.

Head of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the U.S. Armed Forces, and is a high ranking member of the federal cabinet.

Seal of the National Military Establishment (1947–1949)
Donald Rumsfeld is sworn-in as Secretary of Defense by Associate Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart as U.S. President Gerald R. Ford and Chairman of The Joint Chiefs of Staff General George S. Brown watch at The Pentagon on November 20, 1975.
Department of Defense organizational chart (December 2013)

Only the secretary of defense (or the president or Congress) can authorize the transfer of operational control of forces between the three military departments (Department of the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force) and the eleven Unified Combatant Commands.

The personal flag used by Assistant Secretaries of the Navy as well as the General Counsel of the Navy.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy

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The personal flag used by Assistant Secretaries of the Navy as well as the General Counsel of the Navy.

Assistant Secretary of the Navy (ASN) is the title given to certain civilian senior officials in the United States Department of the Navy.

Organizational chart of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV).

Structure of the United States Navy

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The structure of the United States Navy consists of four main bodies: the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, the operating forces (described below), and the Shore Establishment.

The structure of the United States Navy consists of four main bodies: the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, the operating forces (described below), and the Shore Establishment.

Organizational chart of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV).
Numbered fleets of the United States Navy
Members of Inshore Boat Unit 24 patrol near Kuwait Naval Base.
A Marine F/A-18 from VMFA-451 prepares to launch from the USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

(N00N) The director of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, a unique eight-year posting held by a 4 star admiral, which was originally created and served in by Admiral Hyman G. Rickover. The appointment as Director is both a military and civilian position as it is the head of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program in the Department of the Navy and deputy administrator for the Office of Naval Reactors of the National Nuclear Security Administration in the Department of Energy.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff in December 2020.

Joint Chiefs of Staff

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Body of the most senior uniformed leaders within the United States Department of Defense, that advises the president of the United States, the secretary of defense, the Homeland Security Council and the National Security Council on military matters.

Body of the most senior uniformed leaders within the United States Department of Defense, that advises the president of the United States, the secretary of defense, the Homeland Security Council and the National Security Council on military matters.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff in December 2020.
United States Secretary of Defense Harold Brown and United States Deputy Secretary of Defense Charles W. Duncan Jr with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General George S. Brown and the other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon in 1977
Joint Chiefs of Staff meeting (circa 1943). From left to right are: Gen. Henry H. Arnold, Chief of the Army Air Forces; Adm. William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy; Adm. Ernest J. King, Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet and Chief of Naval Operations; and Gen. George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff of the United States Army.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1959.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in an annual meeting with the commanders of unified and specified command in the JCS meeting room, also known as "The Tank" on January 15, 1981.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2002
The Joint Staff Organization Chart as of March 2018
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during a press conference at The Pentagon with Secretary of Defense. From left to right are Army Vice Chief of Staff General Richard A. Cody, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Vern Clark, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. Air Force General Richard B. Myers, U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, Air Force Chief of Staff General John P. Jumper and Commandant of the Marine Corps General Michael Hagee. In the absence of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff or the Service Chief, the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Vice Service Chief will replace its presence at an important event.
Members of The Joint Chiefs of Staff with U.S. Secretary of Defense in 1973.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff (seated) and the directors of the Joint Staff directorates (standing), November 1989.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff during its early days in 1949.
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at The Pentagon in 1958.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1961.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1968.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1971.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1977.
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff with President-Elect Jimmy Carter and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld on December 17, 1976.
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during a cabinet meeting in the White House in 1977
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1981.
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during President Ronald Reagan Inaugural Parade in January 20, 1981.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1983.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1986.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2001.
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff render a salute for the late President Ronald Reagan at Andrews Air Force Base in 2004.
Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at Andrews Air Force Base during a funeral service ceremony for the late President Gerald Ford on December 26, 2006.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Senate Armed Services Committee testimony in The Capitol Hill 2010.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2017.

Although it is a branch of the Armed Forces pursuant to, the Coast Guard operates under the Department of Homeland Security rather than the Department of Defense, except when the president (e.g., in times of war or national emergency) transfers it to the Department of the Navy.

A demonstration of warning shots fired at a non-compliant boat by a USCG HITRON MH-65C and its M240 machine gun

United States Coast Guard

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Maritime security, search and rescue, and law enforcement service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's eight uniformed services.

Maritime security, search and rescue, and law enforcement service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's eight uniformed services.

A demonstration of warning shots fired at a non-compliant boat by a USCG HITRON MH-65C and its M240 machine gun
Logo of the Search and Rescue Program of the U.S. Coast Guard
An NRC FEMA First Team truck being loaded onto a Coast Guard plane for flight to Puerto Rico
Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT) hooking and climbing onto a target to show the skills needed to complete a variety of missions dealing with anti-terrorism, protecting local maritime assets, and harbor and inshore security patrols as well as detecting, stopping, and arresting submerged divers, using the Underwater Port Security System
USCG Districts
The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters building in St. Elizabeths West Campus
Insignia of the twenty-one different warrant officer specialties within the USCG
Training exercise at Cape Disappointment State Park, Washington
Recruit companies visiting Arlington National Cemetery for their one day of off-base liberty, which is their only break in an eight-week boot camp at the Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May, New Jersey
, the first Legend-class national security cutters
, the tenth Famous-class medium endurance cutters
, the tenth Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter
and, s
A U.S. Coast Guard 45 ft Response Boat Medium (RB-M)
A U.S. Coast Guard 25 ft Defender Class Response Boat – Small (RB-S)
A C-37A Gulfstream in flight
An HC-144A Ocean Sentry in flight
An HC-130 Hercules in flight
C-27J Spartan
An HH-60J Jayhawk conducting rescue demonstration
An MH-65C Dolphin in flight
USCGC Legare fire the ship's MK-75 76mm cannon
USCGC Bertholf test firing its MK110 57mm gun
The SIG P229R-DAK is the standard sidearm of the U.S. Coast Guard.
Ensign of the United States Coast Guard
Former Coast Guard ensign, used from 1915 to 1953
Customs Ensign
Parade Standard of the U.S. Coast Guard.
Service mark (also known as the Racing Stripe)
Photo showing a variety of Coast Guard uniforms. From Left: Service Dress White, Tropical Blue, Service Dress Blue, Winter Dress Blue, Camouflage Utility Uniform, Operational Dress Uniform
A U.S. Coast Guard recruiter wearing the Winter Dress Blue uniform with garrison cap
A Coast Guard chief warrant officer (CWO2, left) and an officer (commander, O-5, right) wearing Full Dress Whites
The United States Coast Guard Ceremonial Honor Guard wears Full Dress Blue with white gun belts at the Tomb of Unknown Soldier
Coast Guardsmen in 2013 wearing ODUs
Coast Guard cadets wearing Full Dress Blue (B) uniforms
The U.S. Coast Guard Pipe Band in New York during the 2010 St. Patrick's Day Parade
Port Security Unit 313, Everett, Washington
Seal of the United States Coast Guard Reserve
SPARS recruiting poster during World War II
Badge of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary
Marine Corps Privates First Class William A. McCoy and Ralph L. Plunkett holding a sign thanking the Coast Guard after the Battle of Guam in 1944<ref>{{cite web |last=Papp |first=Robert J. Jr. |author-link=Robert J. Papp Jr. |url=http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2012/09/the-legacy-of-signalman-1st-class-douglas-munro/ |title=The legacy of Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro |work=Coast Guard Compass |date=27 September 2012 |access-date=9 October 2012 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20121005183703/http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2012/09/the-legacy-of-signalman-1st-class-douglas-munro/ |archive-date=5 October 2012 |url-status=live }}</ref>
A gun crew on board {{USCGC|Point Comfort|WPB-82317}} firing an 81mm mortar during the bombardment of a suspected Viet Cong staging area one mile behind An Thoi in August 1965
{{USCGC|Duane|WPG-33}} shelling targets in Vietnam in 1967, where the Coast Guard was a part of Operation Market Time
United States Coast Guard Squadron One unit patch during the Vietnam War
Seal of the United States Coast Guard Deployable Operations Group
{{USS|Vandegrift|FFG 48}} and {{USCGC|Mellon|WHEC-717}} cruising side by side in the Java Sea on May 28, 2010
A member of USCG Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) 106 performing a security sweep aboard a tanker ship in the North Persian Gulf in July 2007
A Coast Guardsman stands guard over more than 40,000 pounds of cocaine worth an estimated $500 million being offloaded from the Cutter Sherman, 23 April 2007.
A boatswain's mate keeps watch on a small boat as it heads for the USCGC Chandeleur in 2008
A Coast Guard Aviation Survival Technician assisting with the rescue of a pregnant woman during Hurricane Katrina in 2005

During times of war, it can be transferred in whole or in part to the U.S. Department of the Navy under the Department of Defense by order of the U.S. President or by act of Congress.