United States Department of the Treasury

Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury DepartmentU.S. TreasuryUnited States Treasury DepartmentUnited States TreasuryDepartment of the TreasuryTreasuryU.S. Department of the TreasuryUS Treasury DepartmentUS Treasury
The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government.wikipedia
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United States Mint

U.S. MintUnited States Bureau of the MintUS Mint
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.
The United States Mint is a unit of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion.

Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Bureau of Printing and EngravingBureau of EngravingBEP
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.
The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is a government agency within the United States Department of the Treasury that designs and produces a variety of security products for the United States government, most notable of which is Federal Reserve Notes (paper money) for the Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank.

Internal Revenue Service

IRSinternal revenueBureau of Internal Revenue
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.
The government agency is a bureau of the Department of the Treasury, and is under the immediate direction of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, who is appointed to a five-year term by the President of the United States.

United States Treasury security

Treasury billsTreasury securitiesTreasury bond
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.
United States Treasury securities are government debt instruments issued by the United States Department of the Treasury to finance government spending as an alternative to taxation.

Treasurer of the United States

United States TreasurerU.S. TreasurerTreasurer
The Treasurer of the United States has no fixed duties, but advises the Secretary on various matters such as coinage and currency production.
The Treasurer of the United States is an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was originally charged with the receipt and custody of government funds, though many of these functions have been taken over by different bureaus of the Department.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
The first Secretary of the Treasury was Alexander Hamilton, sworn into office on September 11, 1789.
Hamilton led the Treasury Department as a trusted member of President Washington's first Cabinet.

Federal Reserve Note

Federal Reserve Notesbanknoteslarge-sized note
Signatures of both officials appear on all Federal Reserve notes.
They have replaced United States Notes, which were once issued by the Treasury Department.

United States federal executive departments

federal executive departmentsexecutive departmentsfederal executive department
The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government.

Treasury Building (Washington, D.C.)

Treasury BuildingU.S. Treasury BuildingUnited States Treasury Building
His portrait appears on the obverse of the ten-dollar bill, while the Treasury Department building is depicted on the reverse.
The Treasury Building in Washington, D.C., is a National Historic Landmark building which is the headquarters of the United States Department of the Treasury.

Treasury

State TreasuryRoyal Treasurytreasuries
The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government.
The IRS is the revenue agency of the US Department of the Treasury.

Presidency of George Washington

first inauguration of George WashingtonWashington administrationinaugurated
Hamilton established—almost singlehandedly—the nation's early financial system and for several years was a major presence in Washington's administration.
The Department of War was retained on August 7, while the Finance office was renamed as the Department of the Treasury on September 2.

United States Secretary of the Treasury

Secretary of the TreasuryTreasury SecretaryU.S. Secretary of the Treasury
The Department is administered by the Secretary of the Treasury, who is a member of the Cabinet.
The secretary of the treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury which is concerned with all financial and monetary matters relating to the federal government, and, until 2003, also included several major federal law enforcement agencies.

Register of the Treasury

RegisterRegister of the U.S. TreasuryRegistrar of the treasury
His staff included a comptroller, a treasurer, a register, and auditors, who managed the country's finances through 1784, when Morris resigned because of ill health.
The Register of the Treasury was an office of the United States Treasury Department.

United States Assistant Secretary of the Treasury

Assistant Secretary of the TreasuryAssistant Secretary for Financial InstitutionsAssistant Secretaries of the Treasury
On September 2, 1789, Congress created a permanent institution for the management of government finances: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That there shall be a Department of Treasury, in which shall be the following officers, namely: a Secretary of the Treasury, to be deemed head of the department; a Comptroller, an Auditor, a Treasurer, a Register, and an Assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury, which assistant shall be appointed by the said Secretary.
A United States Assistant Secretary of the Treasury is one of several positions in the United States Department of the Treasury, serving under the United States Secretary of the Treasury.

Banknote

paper moneybanknotespaper currency
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.
Crane and Company patented banknote paper with embedded silk threads in 1844 and has supplied paper to the United States Treasury since 1879.

United States Secret Service

Secret ServiceU.S. Secret ServiceUS Secret Service
Effective March 1, 2003, the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, the United States Customs Service, and the United States Secret Service were transferred to the newly created Department of Homeland Security ("DHS").
Until 2003, the Secret Service was part of the Department of the Treasury, as the agency was originally founded to combat the then-widespread counterfeiting of US currency.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Hamilton was appointed by President George Washington on the recommendation of Robert Morris, Washington's first choice for the position, who had declined the appointment.
Congress created executive departments in 1789, including the State Department in July, the Department of War in August, and the Treasury Department in September.

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

ATFBureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and FirearmsBureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives
Effective January 24, 2003, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), which had been a bureau of the Department since 1972, was extensively reorganized under the provisions of the Homeland Security Act of 2002.
The ATF was formerly part of the United States Department of the Treasury, having been formed in 1886 as the "Revenue Laboratory" within the Treasury Department's Bureau of Internal Revenue.

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

TTBTax and Trade BureauAlcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Bureau
The regulatory and tax collection functions of ATF related to legitimate traffic in alcohol and tobacco remained with the Treasury at its new Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB).
The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, statutorily named the Tax and Trade Bureau and frequently shortened to TTB, is a bureau of the United States Department of the Treasury, which regulates and collects taxes on trade and imports of alcohol, tobacco, and firearms within the United States.

National debt of the United States

national debtUnited States public debtfederal deficit
The national debt of the United States is the total debt, or unpaid borrowed funds, carried by the federal government of the United States, which is measured as the face value of the currently outstanding Treasury securities that have been issued by the Treasury and other federal government agencies.

National Institute of Standards and Technology

NISTNational Bureau of StandardsBureau of Standards
After 1901, responsibility was assigned to the agency that subsequently became known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
From 1830 until 1901, the role of overseeing weights and measures was carried out by the Office of Standard Weights and Measures, which was part of the United States Department of the Treasury.

Bills of credit

bill of credit
The delegates resolved to issue paper money in the form of bills of credit, promising redemption in coin on faith in the revolutionary cause.
In 1862, the United States Department of the Treasury began to issue United States Notes as obligations of the United States.

Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance

Under Secretary for Domestic FinanceUnder Secretary for the US TreasuryUnder Secretary of Treasury for Domestic Finance
The Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance is a high-ranking position within United States Department of the Treasury that reports to, advises, and assists the Secretary of the Treasury and the Deputy Secretary of the Treasury.

Savings and loan association

savings and loanthriftssavings and loan associations
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.

United States Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland SecurityU.S. Department of Homeland SecurityHomeland Security
Effective March 1, 2003, the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, the United States Customs Service, and the United States Secret Service were transferred to the newly created Department of Homeland Security ("DHS").