United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States RepresentativeHouse of RepresentativesRepresentativeCongressmanHouseU.S. CongressmanU.S. HouseUnited States Congressman
The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house.wikipedia
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United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house.
The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States, and consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house.
The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States.

List of United States congressional districts

congressional districtscongressional districtdistrict
The House is composed of representatives who sit in congressional districts that are allocated to each of the 50 states on a basis of population as measured by the U.S. Census, with each district entitled to one representative.
Congressional districts in the United States are electoral divisions for the purpose of electing members of the United States House of Representatives.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
The composition of the House is established by Article One of the United States Constitution.
Under Article One, Congress is a bicameral legislature consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate.

United States congressional apportionment

reapportionmentCongressional apportionmentapportioned
The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435.
United States congressional apportionment is the process by which seats in the United States House of Representatives are distributed among the 50 states according to the most recent decennial census mandated by the United States Constitution.

List of United States Representatives from California

CaliforniaCAU.S. Representative from California
As of the 2010 Census, the largest delegation is that of California, with fifty-three representatives.
The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of California.

Impeachment in the United States

impeachmentimpeachedimpeach
In addition to this basic power, the House has certain exclusive powers, among them the power to initiate all bills related to revenue; the impeachment of federal officers, who are sent to trial before the Senate; and, in cases wherein no candidate receives a majority of electors for president, the duty falls upon the House to elect one of the top three recipients of electors for that office, with one vote given to each state for that purpose.
At the federal level, this is at the discretion of the House of Representatives.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
In addition to this basic power, the House has certain exclusive powers, among them the power to initiate all bills related to revenue; the impeachment of federal officers, who are sent to trial before the Senate; and, in cases wherein no candidate receives a majority of electors for president, the duty falls upon the House to elect one of the top three recipients of electors for that office, with one vote given to each state for that purpose.
Each state's number of electors is equal to the combined total of the state's membership in the Senate and House of Representatives; currently there are 100 senators and 435 representatives.

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Speaker of the HouseSpeaker of the House of RepresentativesSpeaker
The presiding officer is the speaker of the House, who is elected by the members thereof (and is therefore traditionally the leader of the controlling party).
The speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives.

Apportionment Act of 1911

Public Law 62-5fixed by law1911
The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435.
The law initially set the number of members of the United States House of Representatives at 433, effective with the 63rd Congress on March 4, 1913.

United States Capitol

U.S. CapitolCapitolCapitol Building
The House meets in the south wing of the United States Capitol.
The original building was completed in 1800 and was subsequently expanded, particularly with the addition of the massive dome, and expanded chambers for the bicameral legislature, the House of Representatives in the south wing and the Senate in the north wing.

2010 United States Census

2010 census20102010 U.S. Census
As of the 2010 Census, the largest delegation is that of California, with fifty-three representatives.
Michele Bachmann, a former conservative Republican Representative from Minnesota, stated that she would not fill out her census form other than to indicate the number of people living in her household because "the Constitution doesn't require any information beyond that."

House Republican Conference

Republican ConferenceHouse RepublicansRepublican Conference of the United States House of Representatives
The speaker and other floor leaders are chosen by the Democratic Caucus or the Republican Conference, depending on whichever party has more voting members.
The House Republican Conference is the party caucus for Republicans in the United States House of Representatives.

House Democratic Caucus

DemocraticDemocratic CaucusHouse Democrats
The speaker and other floor leaders are chosen by the Democratic Caucus or the Republican Conference, depending on whichever party has more voting members.
The House Democratic Caucus is a congressional caucus composed of all Democratic Representatives in the United States House of Representatives and is responsible for nominating and electing the Democratic Party leadership in the chamber.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
After eight years of a more limited confederal government under the Articles, numerous political leaders such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton initiated the Constitutional Convention in 1787, which received the Confederation Congress's sanction to "amend the Articles of Confederation".
After the ratification of the Constitution, Madison emerged as an important leader in the United States House of Representatives and served as a close adviser to President George Washington.

At-large

at largeAt-Large DistrictsNationwide Constituency
Seven states have only one representative: Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming.
Article One of the United States Constitution provides for direct election of members of the House of Representatives.

Bill (United States Congress)

billsbillcongressional bill
The House is charged with the passage of federal legislation, known as bills, which, after concurrence by the Senate, are sent to the president for consideration.
In the United States Congress, a bill is proposed legislation under consideration by either of the two chambers of Congress: the House of Representatives or the Senate.

History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocrat
The Democratic Party and Republican Party each held majorities in the House at various times.
Over the same period, the Democrats proved more competitive with the Republicans in Congressional politics, enjoying House of Representatives majorities (as in the 65th Congress) in 15 of the 36 Congresses elected, although only in five of these did they form the majority in the Senate.

Wilmot Proviso

Proviso
One example of a provision repeatedly supported by the House but blocked by the Senate was the Wilmot Proviso, which sought to ban slavery in the land gained during the Mexican–American War.
Congressman David Wilmot of Pennsylvania first introduced the proviso in the United States House of Representatives on August 8, 1846, as a rider on a $2,000,000 appropriations bill intended for the final negotiations to resolve the Mexican–American War (this was only three months into the two-year war).

United States House Committee on Rules

RulesHouse Rules CommitteeRules Committee
The powers of the speaker included chairmanship of the influential Rules Committee and the ability to appoint members of other House committees.
The Committee on Rules, or more commonly, the Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives.

Thomas Brackett Reed

Thomas B. ReedThomas ReedCzar" Reed
The rise of the speaker's influence began in the 1890s, during the tenure of Republican Thomas Brackett Reed.
He was elected to the United States House of Representatives 12 times, first in 1876, and served as Speaker of the House, from 1889–1891 and again from 1895–1899.

Republican Revolution

1994 Republican RevolutionThe Republican Revolution1994
The Republicans took control of the House in 1995, under the leadership of Speaker Newt Gingrich.
The Republican Revolution, Revolution of '94, or Gingrich Revolution, refers to the Republican Party (GOP) success in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate.

Newt Gingrich

GingrichConservative Opportunity SocietySpeaker Gingrich
The Republicans took control of the House in 1995, under the leadership of Speaker Newt Gingrich.
A member of the Republican Party, he was the U.S. Representative for Georgia's 6th congressional district from 1979 until his resignation in 1999.

Joseph Gurney Cannon

Joseph G. CannonJoseph CannonJoe Cannon
The speakership reached its zenith during the term of Republican Joseph Gurney Cannon, from 1903 to 1911.
Cannon served as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1903 to 1911, and many consider him to be the most dominant Speaker in United States history, with such control over the House that he could often control debate.

Bill Clinton

ClintonPresident ClintonPresident Bill Clinton
Many elements of the Contract did not pass Congress, were vetoed by President Bill Clinton, or were substantially altered in negotiations with Clinton.
In 1998, Clinton was impeached by the House of Representatives.