United States Mint

U.S. MintUnited States Bureau of the MintUS MintMintBureau of the MintMint of the United StatesFederal Mintmintedthe Mintmints
The United States Mint is a unit of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion.wikipedia
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United States Department of the Treasury

Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury
The United States Mint is a unit of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. Under the Coinage Act of 1873, the Mint became part of the Department of the Treasury.
Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.

Coinage Act of 1792

Mint Act of 1792Coinage ActMint Act
The current United States Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act of 1792, and originally placed within the Department of State.
The Coinage Act or the Mint Act, passed by the United States Congress on April 2, 1792, created the United States dollar as the country's standard unit of money, established the United States Mint, and regulated the coinage of the United States.

Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Bureau of Printing and EngravingBureau of EngravingBEP
It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
The BEP does not produce coins; all coinage is produced by the United States Mint.

Denver Mint

DenverDDenver Mints
It operates mint facilities in Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point, New York and a bullion depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
The Denver Mint is a branch of the United States Mint that struck its first coins on February 1, 1906.

West Point Mint

WWest Point Bullion DepositoryWest Point
It operates mint facilities in Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point, New York and a bullion depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
The West Point Mint Facility is a U.S. Mint production and depository facility erected in 1937 near the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York, United States.

United States Department of State

State DepartmentU.S. State DepartmentDepartment of State
The current United States Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act of 1792, and originally placed within the Department of State.
These responsibilities grew to include management of the United States Mint, keeper of the Great Seal of the United States, and the taking of the census.

Charlotte Mint

CharlotteCharlotte, North Carolinafederal mint
Official Mints (Branches) were once also located in Carson City, Nevada; Charlotte, North Carolina; Dahlonega, Georgia; New Orleans, Louisiana; and even in Manila, in the Philippines.
The Charlotte Mint was the first United States branch mint.

New Orleans Mint

New OrleansNew Orleans, LouisianaMint
Official Mints (Branches) were once also located in Carson City, Nevada; Charlotte, North Carolina; Dahlonega, Georgia; New Orleans, Louisiana; and even in Manila, in the Philippines.
The New Orleans Mint (Monnaie de La Nouvelle-Orléans) operated in New Orleans, Louisiana, as a branch mint of the United States Mint from 1838 to 1861 and from 1879 to 1909.

Carson City Mint

Carson City, NevadaCarson CityThe United States Mint at Carson City, Nevada
Official Mints (Branches) were once also located in Carson City, Nevada; Charlotte, North Carolina; Dahlonega, Georgia; New Orleans, Louisiana; and even in Manila, in the Philippines.
The Carson City Mint was a branch of the United States Mint in Carson City, Nevada.

Philadelphia Mint

PhiladelphiaPU.S. Mint
It operates mint facilities in Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point, New York and a bullion depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The Mint has operated several branch facilities throughout the United States since the Philadelphia Mint opened in 1792, in a building known as "Ye Olde Mint".
It proclaimed the creation of the United States Mint.

Dahlonega Mint

DahlonegaDahlonega, GeorgiaDahlonega Gold Mint
Official Mints (Branches) were once also located in Carson City, Nevada; Charlotte, North Carolina; Dahlonega, Georgia; New Orleans, Louisiana; and even in Manila, in the Philippines.
The Dahlonega Mint was a former branch of the United States Mint built during the Georgia Gold Rush to help the miners get their gold assayed and minted, without having to travel to the Philadelphia Mint.

Coinage Act of 1873

Fourth Coinage ActCrime of '73Mint Act of 1873
Under the Coinage Act of 1873, the Mint became part of the Department of the Treasury.
The Coinage Act of 1873 or Mint Act of 1873, 17 Stat. 424, was a general revision of the laws relating to the Mint of the United States.

Treasurer of the United States

United States TreasurerU.S. TreasurerTreasurer
It was placed under the auspices of the Treasurer of the United States in 1981.
Responsibility for oversight of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the United States Mint, and the United States Savings Bonds Division (now the Savings Bond Marketing Office within the Bureau of the Public Debt) was assigned to the Treasurer in 1981.

Director of the United States Mint

Director of the MintMint DirectorDirector of the U.S. Mint
The first Director of the United States Mint was renowned scientist David Rittenhouse from 1792 to 1795.
When the position of the director is vacant, the senior career (non-political) official of the mint serves as the acting director.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.
The highest recorded temperature at the official National Weather Service downtown observation station (currently at the United States Mint building) was 106 F on September 1, 2017.

Chief Engraver of the United States Mint

Chief Engraver
Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, and Christian Gobrecht.
The Chief Engraver of the United States Mint is the highest staff member at the United States Mint.

David Rittenhouse

RittenhouseRittenhouse orrery
The first Director of the United States Mint was renowned scientist David Rittenhouse from 1792 to 1795.
Rittenhouse was a member of the American Philosophical Society and the first director of the United States Mint.

Henry Voigt

Henry Voight
Henry Voigt was the first Superintendent and Chief Coiner, and is credited with some of the first U.S. coin designs.
Henry Voigt or Henry Voight (1738–1814) was a clockmaker, mathematical instrument maker, machine and steam engine builder, and Chief Coiner of the first United States Mint.

James B. Longacre

James Barton LongacreJames LongacreLongacre
Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, and Christian Gobrecht.
James Barton Longacre (August 11, 1794 – January 1, 1869) was an American portraitist and engraver, and the fourth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 until his death.

Frank Gasparro

Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, and Christian Gobrecht.
Frank Gasparro (August 26, 1909 – September 29, 2001) was the tenth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint, holding this position from February 23, 1965, to January 16, 1981.

Christian Gobrecht

Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, and Christian Gobrecht.
Christian Gobrecht (December 23, 1785 – July 23, 1844) was the third Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1840 until his death in 1844.

Manila Mint

Manila, PhilippinesManilaManila mints
Official Mints (Branches) were once also located in Carson City, Nevada; Charlotte, North Carolina; Dahlonega, Georgia; New Orleans, Louisiana; and even in Manila, in the Philippines.
The Manila Mint (Real Casa de la Moneda y Timbre de Manila) was a coinage mint that briefly served as a branch of the United States Mint, located in Manila, now the capital city of the Philippines.

William Barber (engraver)

William Barberhis fatherWilliam
Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, and Christian Gobrecht.
William Barber (May 2, 1807 – August 31, 1879) was the fifth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1869 until his death.

Charles E. Barber

Charles BarberBarber
Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, and Christian Gobrecht.
Charles Edward Barber (November 16, 1840 – February 18, 1917) was the sixth chief engraver of the United States Mint from 1879 until his death in 1917.

Branch mint

branchbranch facilitiesFrench mints
The Mint has operated several branch facilities throughout the United States since the Philadelphia Mint opened in 1792, in a building known as "Ye Olde Mint".
The original and main Mint of the United States Mint, has been located in Philadelphia (P or no letter), since 1793.