A report on United States Secretary of State

Member of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States and the head of the U.S. Department of State.

- United States Secretary of State

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Van Buren by Mathew Brady, c. 1855–1858

Martin Van Buren

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American lawyer and statesman who served as the eighth president of the United States from 1837 to 1841.

American lawyer and statesman who served as the eighth president of the United States from 1837 to 1841.

Van Buren by Mathew Brady, c. 1855–1858
Van Buren's birthplace by John Warner Barber
Baptism record indicating the Dutch spelling of Van Buren's first name, "Maarten"
Hannah Van Buren
Painting of Van Buren by Daniel Dickinson, c. 1820s
Mrs Floride Calhoun, a leader of the "petticoats"
A painting of Van Buren by Francis Alexander, c. undefined 1830
1836 electoral vote results
Painting of Van Buren by Henry Inman, c. 1837–38
The modern balaam and his ass, an 1837 caricature placing the blame for the Panic of 1837 and the perilous state of the banking system on outgoing President Andrew Jackson, shown riding a donkey, while President Martin Van Buren comments approvingly
A United States Marine Corps boat expedition searching the Everglades during the Second Seminole War
"Destruction of the Caroline", illustration by John Charles Dent (1881)
1840 electoral vote results
Daguerreotype of Van Buren by Mathew Brady, c. 1849–50
Daguerreotype of Martin Van Buren, circa 1855
1858 portrait by GPA Healy, on display at the White House
Gubernatorial portrait of Martin Van Buren by Daniel Huntington in The Civil War

A founder of the Democratic Party, he had previously served as the ninth governor of New York, the 10th United States secretary of state, and the eighth vice president of the United States.

Adams c. 1843–48, photographed by
Mathew Brady

John Quincy Adams

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American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States, from 1825 to 1829.

American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States, from 1825 to 1829.

Adams c. 1843–48, photographed by
Mathew Brady
Adams's birthplace in Quincy, Massachusetts
1815 US passport issued by John Quincy Adams at London.
Adams portrait – Gilbert Stuart, 1818
Painting of John Quincy Adams by Thomas Sully, 1824
In the Adams–Onís Treaty, the United States acquired Florida and set the western border of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase.
1824 presidential election results
General Andrew Jackson, Adams's opponent in the 1824 and 1828 United States presidential elections
Painting of Quincy Adams by Charles Osgood, 1828
Quincy Adams appointed Henry Clay as Secretary of State
1828 presidential election results
Daguerreotype of Quincy Adams by Philip Haas, 1843
Portrait of Quincy Adams by William Hudson, 1844
John Quincy Adams, c. 1840s, Unknown author
BEP engraved portrait of Adams as president
Adams's portrait at the U.S. National Portrait Gallery by George Bingham c. 1850 copy of an 1844 original
Adams's cenotaph at the Congressional Cemetery
John Quincy Adams's original tomb at Hancock Cemetery, across the street from United First Parish Church
Presidential Dollar of John Quincy Adams
Official portrait of Adams by George Peter Alexander Healy, c. 1858
Peacefield - John Quincy Adam's Home
Tombs of Presidents John Adams (far left) and John Quincy Adams (right) and their wives Abigail and Louisa, in a family crypt beneath the United First Parish Church.

He previously served as the eighth United States Secretary of State from 1817 to 1825.

President Joe Biden's Cabinet pictured in July 2021

Cabinet of the United States

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Body consisting of the vice president of the United States and the heads of the executive branch's departments in the federal government of the United States.

Body consisting of the vice president of the United States and the heads of the executive branch's departments in the federal government of the United States.

President Joe Biden's Cabinet pictured in July 2021
President Joe Biden's Cabinet pictured in July 2021
James K. Polk and his Cabinet in 1845: the first Cabinet to be photographed.
A map showing the historical makeup of the Cabinet of the United States by year.

Washington's Cabinet consisted of five members: himself, Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of War Henry Knox and Attorney General Edmund Randolph.

Vice President of the United States

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Second-highest officer in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.

Second-highest officer in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.

John Adams, the first vice president of the United States
Though prominent as a Missouri Senator, Harry Truman had been vice president only three months when he became president; he was never informed of Franklin Roosevelt's war or postwar policies while vice president.
1888 illustration of John Tyler receiving the news of President William Henry Harrison's death from Chief Clerk of the State Department Fletcher Webster
Then-Vice President Joe Biden meets with President Barack Obama in the Oval Office, 2010
Geraldine Ferraro speaks at the 1984 Democratic National Convention following her selection as the party's vice presidential nominee
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the Congressional District Method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Four vice presidents: (from left) outgoing president Lyndon B. Johnson (the 37th vice president), incoming president Richard Nixon (36th), (Everett Dirksen administering oath), incoming vice president Spiro Agnew (39th), and outgoing vice president Hubert Humphrey (38th), January 20, 1969
(Left to right) President Richard Nixon, First Lady Pat Nixon, Betty Ford and Congressman Gerald Ford after President Nixon nominated Congressman Ford to be vice president, October 13, 1973
{{center|Dan Quayle (1989–1993) Age {{age|1947|2|4}}}}
{{center|Al Gore (1993–2001) Age {{age|1948|3|31}}}}
{{center|Dick Cheney (2001–2009) Age {{age|1941|1|30}}}}
{{center|Joe Biden (2009–2017) Age {{age|1942|11|20}}}}
{{center|Mike Pence (2017–2021) Age {{age|1959|6|7}}}}

Since presidents rarely die in office, however, the better preparation for the presidency was considered to be the office of Secretary of State, in which Webster served under Harrison, Tyler, and later, Taylor's successor, Fillmore.

Portrait by Rembrandt Peale, 1800

Thomas Jefferson

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American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and Founding Father who served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and Founding Father who served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

Portrait by Rembrandt Peale, 1800
Thomas Jefferson's Coat of Arms
Wren Building, College of William & Mary where Jefferson studied
House of Burgesses in Williamsburg, Virginia, where Jefferson served 1769–1775
Jefferson's home Monticello in Virginia
Jefferson's daughter Martha
U.S. Declaration of Independence – 1823 facsimile of the engrossed copy
Governor's Palace, Governor Jefferson's residence in Williamsburg
Independence Hall Assembly Room where Jefferson served in Congress
Portrait of Thomas Jefferson while in London in 1786 at 44 by Mather Brown
Thomas Jefferson in 1791 at 48 by Charles Willson Peale
1796 election results
Jefferson in 1799 at 57, painted by Charles Peale Polk
1800 election results
President Thomas Jefferson Peale 1805 Reproduction
Barbary Coast of North Africa 1806. Left is Morocco at Gibraltar, center is Tunis, and right is Tripoli.
The 1803 Louisiana Purchase totaled 827,987 sqmi, doubling the size of the United States.
Corps of Discovery, October 1805 (by Charles Marion Russell, 1905)
map
Black Hoof, leader of the Shawnee, accepted Jefferson's Indian assimilation policies.
1804 Electoral College vote
1802 portrait of Aaron Burr by John Vanderlyn
HMS Leopard (right) firing upon USS Chesapeake
A political cartoon showing merchants dodging the "Ograbme", which is "Embargo" spelled backwards (1807)
Portrait of Jefferson by Gilbert Stuart, 1821.
The University of Virginia, Jefferson's "Academical Village"
In 1804, Abigail Adams attempted to reconcile Jefferson and Adams.
Lafayette in 1824, portrait by Ary Scheffer, hanging in U.S. House of Representatives
Jefferson's gravesite
Thomas Jefferson at age 78. Portrait by Thomas Sully hanging at West Point, commissioned by Faculty and Cadets, 1821.
The Jefferson Bible featuring only the words of Jesus from the evangelists, in parallel Greek, Latin, French and English
Jefferson by Gilbert Stuart in 1805
Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton, national bank proponent and Jefferson's adversary
Jefferson's 1795 Farm Book, page 30, lists 163 slaves at Monticello.
Jefferson depicted as a rooster, and Hemings as a hen
Virginia State Capitol, designed by Jefferson (wings added later)
Mount Rushmore National Memorial (left to right): George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln
Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Thomas Jefferson Memorial Statue, by Rudulph Evans (1947)
Jefferson on the $2 bill
alt=Commemorative stone erected at Thomas Jefferson's birthplace in Shadwell, Virginia, on April 13, 1929.|Jefferson's Birthplace
Albert Gallatin Jefferson's Treasury economic architect Stuart 1803

He was previously the second vice president of the United States under John Adams and the first United States secretary of state under George Washington.

Portrait by George Peter Alexander Healy c. undefined 1845

John C. Calhoun

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American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina who held many important positions including being the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832, while adamantly defending slavery and protecting the interests of the white South.

American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina who held many important positions including being the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832, while adamantly defending slavery and protecting the interests of the white South.

Portrait by George Peter Alexander Healy c. undefined 1845
Calhoun's wife, Floride Calhoun
Charles Bird King's 1822 portrait of Calhoun at the age of 40
State historic marker at Fort Hill, Calhoun's home from 1825 until his death in 1850
A portrait of Calhoun from 1834 by Rembrandt Peale
Calhoun, during his tenure as Secretary of State (April 1844 – March 1845)
Daguerreotype of Calhoun, c. 1843
Calhoun photographed by Mathew Brady in 1849, shortly before his death
Calhoun's grave at St. Philip's Church yard in Charleston
George Peter Alexander Healy's 1851 painting of Calhoun on exhibit at City Hall in Charleston, South Carolina
Calhoun's home, Fort Hill, on the grounds that became part of Clemson University, in Clemson, South Carolina
Undated photograph of Calhoun
John C. Calhoun postage stamp, CSA issue of 1862, unused
Confederate First issue banknote depicting both Calhoun and Andrew Jackson (Act of March 9, 1861)
John C. Calhoun statue in National Statuary Hall Collection at the U.S. Capitol

Calhoun served as Secretary of State under President John Tyler from 1844 to 1845, and in that role supported the annexation of Texas as a means to extend the slave power and helped to settle the Oregon boundary dispute with Britain.

Clay photographed in 1848

Henry Clay

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American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

Clay photographed in 1848
Henry Clay and Lucretia
View of Henry Clay's law office (1803–1810), Lexington, Kentucky
Portrait by Matthew Harris Jouett, 1818
Clay helped Adams win the 1825 contingent House election after Clay failed to finish among the three electoral vote-winners. States in orange voted for Crawford, states in green for Adams, and states in blue for Jackson.
Portrait of Henry Clay
Clay supported construction of the National Road, which extended west from Cumberland, Maryland.
Henry Clay, circa 1832
Andrew Jackson defeated Clay in the 1832 election
Clay (brown) won the backing of several state delegations on the first ballot of the 1839 Whig National Convention, but William Henry Harrison ultimately won the party's presidential nomination.
James K. Polk defeated Clay in the 1844 election.
Clay (brown) won the backing of numerous delegates on the first ballot of the 1848 Whig National Convention, but Zachary Taylor ultimately won the party's presidential nomination.
Henry Clay Jr., who died serving in the Mexican–American War
Henry Clay monument and mausoleum, Lexington Cemetery
Clay's estate, Ashland, in Lexington, Kentucky

He was the seventh House speaker as well as the ninth secretary of state, also receiving electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections.

Daniel Webster

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Coat of Arms of Daniel Webster
New Hampshire historical marker (number 91) at his birthplace in present-day Franklin, New Hampshire
Daniel Webster's home in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The home has since been restored and is now part of the Strawbery Banke museum complex.
Daniel Webster represented the Second Bank of the United States both in the Congress and before the US Supreme Court as well serving as Director of its Boston branch on which he made out this $3,001.01 draft on July 24, 1824.
1834 portrait by Francis Alexander
Portion of painting, Webster's Reply to Hayne by George P.A. Healy
1836 electoral vote results
Through the Webster–Ashburton Treaty, Webster helped bring an end to a boundary dispute in Maine
Portrait of Daniel Webster commissioned by the Senate in 1955
Daniel Webster
Webster (red) won the support of several delegates at the 1852 Whig National Convention
Grace Fletcher
Colonel Fletcher Webster
Daniel Webster monument, Central Park, New York City, from the base: "Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable"
Webster Hall, at Dartmouth College, houses the Rauner Special Collections Library, which holds some of Webster's personal belongings and writings, including his beaver fur top hat and silk socks.
1890 postage stamp honoring Webster

Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

Executive Schedule

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System of salaries given to the highest-ranked appointed officials in the executive branch of the U.S. government.

System of salaries given to the highest-ranked appointed officials in the executive branch of the U.S. government.

Secretary of State

Portrait by John Vanderlyn, 1816

James Madison

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American statesman, diplomat, and Founding Father who served as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

American statesman, diplomat, and Founding Father who served as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

Portrait by John Vanderlyn, 1816
Madison's Birthplace
Madison at Princeton, portrait by James Sharples
Congressional delegate Madison, age 32 by Charles Willson Peale
page one of the original copy
of the U.S. Constitution
Gouverneur Morris signs the Constitution before George Washington. Madison sits next to Robert Morris, in front of Benjamin Franklin. Painting by John Henry Hintermeister, 1925.
Thomas Jefferson founded the Democratic-Republican Party with Madison.
Montpelier, Madison's tobacco plantation in Virginia
The 1803 Louisiana Purchase totaled 827,987 sqmi, doubling the size of the United States.
James Madison by Gilbert Stuart,
1808 electoral vote results
James Madison engraving by David Edwin from between 1809 and 1817
USS Constitution defeats HMS Guerriere, a significant event during the war. U.S. nautical victories boosted American morale.
The British set ablaze the U.S. Capital on August 24, 1814.
Battle of New Orleans. 1815
Battle of Tippecanoe November 7, 1811
Portrait of James Madison c. 1821, by Gilbert Stuart
Madison's gravestone at Montpelier
Portrait of Madison, age 82, c. 1833
A life-sized statue of Madison at James Madison University.
Due to his support for religious liberty, James Madison (upper left) is honored alongside early U.S. Baptist figures in a stained glass window in National Baptist Memorial Church, Washington, D.C.

He played a significant role in establishing and staffing the three Cabinet departments, and his influence helped Thomas Jefferson become the first Secretary of State.