United States Secretary of the Treasury

The former flag of the U.S. secretary of the treasury, originating from the 19th century.

Head of the United States Department of the Treasury, and is the chief financial officer of the federal government of the United States.

- United States Secretary of the Treasury

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United States Secretary of State

Officer of the United States who implements foreign policy for the U.S. government as the head of the U.S. Department of State.

The secretary of state, along with the secretary of the treasury, secretary of defense, and attorney general, are generally regarded as the four most crucial Cabinet members because of the importance of their respective departments.

Cabinet of the United States

Body consisting of the vice president of the United States and the heads of the executive branch's departments in the federal government of the United States.

President Joe Biden's Cabinet pictured in July 2021
President Joe Biden's Cabinet pictured in July 2021
James K. Polk and his Cabinet in 1845: the first Cabinet to be photographed.
A map showing the historical makeup of the Cabinet of the United States by year.

Washington's Cabinet consisted of five members: himself, Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of War Henry Knox and Attorney General Edmund Randolph.

United States Attorney General

Chief law enforcement officer of the federal government of the United States.

The secretary of state, the secretary of the treasury, the secretary of defense, and the attorney general are regarded as the four most important Cabinet officials in the United States because of the size and importance of their respective departments.

United States Secret Service

Federal law enforcement agency under the Department of Homeland Security charged with conducting criminal investigations and protecting U.S. political leaders, their families, and visiting heads of state or government.

Secret Service agents conducting electronic investigations
Sign at the Obama family home in 2021 stating the area is protected by the Secret Service
Secret Service analyst examining counterfeit documents
Secret Service Electronic Crimes Task Force (ECTF)
Secret Service Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Task Force (AFMLTF)
Secret Service Cyber Intelligence Center (CIS)
Secret Service agents responding to the assassination attempt of Ronald Reagan by John Hinckley, Jr. on March 30, 1981
Secret Service agents to guard President George W. Bush in 2008.
Secret Service agents protecting President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama
Secret Service agents executing a protective operation
Secret Service agent trainees at the James J. Rowley Training Center (RTC)
Secret Service agent trainees practice executing a search warrant.
Secret Service officer and his police dog as part of the Emergency Response Team (ERT)
Secret Service snipers protect Vice President Mike Pence in Indianapolis in 2017.
Secret Service counter-sniper marksman on top of the White House's roof, armed with a sniper rifle
Secret Service agent in business suit working President Obama's protection detail
Ford Taurus of the Uniformed Division of the Secret Service.
An Allegheny County Police officer and his working dog screening a US Secret Service vehicle for explosives.
Secret Service Field Offices
Secret Service badge (1875–1890)
Secret Service badge (1890–1971)
Secret Service badge (1971–2003)
Secret Service badge (2003–present)

By custom, it also provides protection to the secretary of the treasury and secretary of homeland security, as well as other persons as directed by the president (usually the White House chief of staff and national security advisor, among others).

United States Secretary of Defense

Head of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the U.S. Armed Forces, and is a high ranking member of the federal cabinet.

Seal of the National Military Establishment (1947–1949)
Donald Rumsfeld is sworn-in as Secretary of Defense by Associate Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart as U.S. President Gerald R. Ford and Chairman of The Joint Chiefs of Staff General George S. Brown watch at The Pentagon on November 20, 1975.
Department of Defense organizational chart (December 2013)

The secretary of state, the secretary of the treasury, the secretary of defense, and the attorney general are generally regarded as the four most important cabinet officials because of the size and importance of their respective departments.

George Shultz

American economist, diplomat, and businessman.

Shultz in the 1980s
Shultz (left) with Richard Nixon and labor leaders at the signing of Executive Order 11491 on October 29, 1969
Treasury Secretary Shultz (back row, fourth from left) with the rest of the Nixon cabinet, June 1972
A meeting of Nixon Administration economic advisors and cabinet members on May 7, 1974. Clockwise from Richard Nixon: George P. Shultz, James T. Lynn, Alexander M. Haig, Jr., Roy L. Ash, Herbert Stein, and William E. Simon.
Shultz with President Reagan outside the Oval Office, December 1986
Shultz (far left) at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library July 17, 2007, with the President of Poland Lech Kaczyński and Mrs. Kaczyński as well as former First Lady Nancy Reagan (center, second from right)
Shultz with Mike Pompeo and Condoleezza Rice in 2020
Shultz with Rex Tillerson and Condoleezza Rice in 2018

In 1970, he became the first director of the Office of Management and Budget, and he served in that position until his appointment as United States Secretary of the Treasury in 1972.

United States Deputy Secretary of the Treasury

The United States Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, in the United States government, advises and assists the Secretary of the Treasury in the supervision and direction of the Department of the Treasury and its activities, and succeeds the Secretary in the secretary's absence, sickness, or unavailability.

Federal Reserve Note

Federal Reserve Notes, also United States banknotes, are the currently issued banknotes of the United States dollar.

1914 $10 FRN, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
1928 $100 FRN, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
1934 $10,000 FRN, depicting Salmon P. Chase
Privately issued note, 1853
United States Note size change from large (gray) to small (green) with plate position letters. Modern Federal Reserve Note (blue) super-imposed on bottom left 1928-size note.
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Although not issued by the Treasury Department, Federal Reserve Notes carry the (engraved) signature of the Treasurer of the United States and the United States Secretary of the Treasury.

United States Customs Service

Agency of the U.S. federal government that collected import tariffs and performed other selected border security duties.

Flag of the United States Customs Service, now the CBP Ensign.

The flag of the Customs Service was designed in 1799 by Secretary of the Treasury Oliver Wolcott Jr. and consists of 16 vertical red and white stripes with a coat of arms depicted in blue on the white canton.

United States dollar

Official currency of the United States and several other countries.

Spanish silver eight-real or peso of 1768
Alexander Hamilton finalized the details of the 1792 Coinage Act and the establishment of the U.S. Mint.
Continental one third dollar bill (obverse)
Series of 1917 $1 United States Note
Gold double eagle ($20 coin), 1907
John Maynard Keynes (right) and Harry Dexter White at the inaugural meeting of the International Monetary Fund in 1946. They were instrumental in drafting the provisions of the post-war global financial system.
The Headquarters of the Federal Reserve System in Washington, D.C.
U.S. Consumer Price Index, starting from 1913

In 1854, Secretary of the Treasury James Guthrie proposed creating $100, $50, and $25 gold coins, to be referred to as a union, half union, and quarter union, respectively, thus implying a denomination of 1 Union = $100.