United States Senate

SenatorSenateU.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. SenateSenatorsU.S. SenatorsUS SenatorUS SenateUnited States Senators
The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives — the lower chamber — comprises the legislature of the United States.wikipedia
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United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeHouse of RepresentativesU.S. House of Representatives
The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives — the lower chamber — comprises the legislature of the United States.
The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives — the lower chamber — comprises the legislature of the United States.
The legislature consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate.

United States Capitol

CapitolU.S. CapitolCapitol Building
The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.
The original building was completed in 1800 and was subsequently expanded, particularly with the addition of the massive dome, and expanded chambers for the bicameral legislature, the House of Representatives in the south wing and the Senate in the north wing.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
The composition and powers of the Senate are established by Article One of the United States Constitution.
Under Article One, Congress is a bicameral legislature consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Seventeenth Amendment17th Amendmentdirect election of Senators
From 1789 until 1913, senators were appointed by legislatures of the states they represented; they are now elected by popular vote, following the ratification of the Seventeenth Amendment in 1913.
The Seventeenth Amendment (Amendment XVII) to the United States Constitution established the popular election of United States Senators by the people of the states.

Upper house

upper chamberupperEuropean Upper Houses
The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives — the lower chamber — comprises the legislature of the United States.
Examples of upper houses in countries include the United Kingdom's House of Lords, India's Rajya Sabha, Pakistan's Senate of Pakistan, Russia's Federation Council, Ireland's Seanad, Malaysia's Dewan Negara, Germany's Bundesrat, Switzerland's Council of States, the Australian Senate, the Dutch Eerste Kamer, and the United States Senate.

United States Senate chamber

Senate chamberchamberSenate floor
The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.
The United States Senate Chamber is a room in the north wing of the United States Capitol that serves as the legislative chamber of the United States Senate, since January 4, 1859.

Washington, D.C.

WashingtonDistrict of ColumbiaWashington, DC
The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.
D.C. residents elect a non-voting, at-large congressional delegate to the House of Representatives, but the District has no representation in the Senate.

Ambassadors of the United States

United States AmbassadorU.S. AmbassadorAmbassador
As the upper chamber of Congress, the Senate has several powers of advice and consent which are unique to it. These include the approval of treaties, and the confirmation of Cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, flag officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, other federal executive officials and other federal uniformed officers.
Their appointment needs to be confirmed by the United States Senate.

List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States

JusticeSupreme Court JusticeSupreme Court Justices
As the upper chamber of Congress, the Senate has several powers of advice and consent which are unique to it. These include the approval of treaties, and the confirmation of Cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, flag officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, other federal executive officials and other federal uniformed officers.
Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the Constitution grants plenary power to the President of the United States to nominate, and with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the United States Senate, appoint justices to the Supreme Court.

U.S. state

Statestatesstatehood
The Senate is composed of senators, each of whom represents a single state in its entirety.
States and their residents are represented in the United States Congress, a bicameral legislature consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Cabinet of the United States

Cabinetcabinet secretaryPresidential Cabinet
As the upper chamber of Congress, the Senate has several powers of advice and consent which are unique to it. These include the approval of treaties, and the confirmation of Cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, flag officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, other federal executive officials and other federal uniformed officers.
All federal public officials, including Cabinet members, are also subject to impeachment by the House of Representatives and trial in the Senate for "treason, bribery, and other high crimes and misdemeanors".

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
In addition to these, in cases wherein no candidate receives a majority of electors for Vice President, the duty falls to the Senate to elect one of the top two recipients of electors for that office.
Each state's number of electors is equal to the combined total of the state's membership in the Senate and House of Representatives; currently there are 100 senators and 435 representatives.

United States federal judge

United States District JudgeUnited States Circuit JudgeSenior United States District Judge
As the upper chamber of Congress, the Senate has several powers of advice and consent which are unique to it. These include the approval of treaties, and the confirmation of Cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, flag officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, other federal executive officials and other federal uniformed officers.
In the United States, the title of federal judge means a judge (pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution) appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate pursuant to the Appointments Clause in Article II of the United States Constitution.

Impeachment in the United States

impeachmentimpeachedimpeach
Furthermore, the Senate has the responsibility of conducting the trials of those impeached by the House.
Analogous to a trial before a judge and jury, these proceedings are (where the legislature is bicameral) conducted by upper house of the legislature, which at the federal level is the Senate.

Vice President of the United States

Vice Presidentvice presidentialU.S. Vice President
In addition to these, in cases wherein no candidate receives a majority of electors for Vice President, the duty falls to the Senate to elect one of the top two recipients of electors for that office.
This all changed on September 4, when the committee recommended that the nation's chief executive be elected by an Electoral College, with each state having a number of presidential electors equal to the sum of that state's allocation of representatives and senators.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
The drafters of the Constitution created a bicameral Congress primarily as a compromise between those who felt that each state, since it was sovereign, should be equally represented, and those who felt the legislature must directly represent the people, as the House of Commons did in Great Britain.
According to the United States Senate: "The Constitution's first three words—We the People—affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers wisely separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments."

Henry Clay

ClayClay, Henrylawyer and politician of the same name
As a result, three senators who failed to meet the age requirement were nevertheless admitted to the Senate: Henry Clay (aged 29 in 1806), Armistead Thomson Mason (aged 28 in 1816), and John Eaton (aged 28 in 1818).
Henry Clay Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was an American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives, served as 7th speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, and served as the 9th U.S. secretary of state.

Article Five of the United States Constitution

Article VArticle Fiveratification
Article Five of the Constitution stipulates that no constitutional amendment may be created to deprive a state of its equal suffrage in the Senate without that state's consent.
Amendments may be proposed either by the Congress with a two-thirds vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate or by a convention of states called for by two-thirds of the state legislatures.

United States federal executive departments

federal executive departmentsexecutive departmentsfederal executive department
As the upper chamber of Congress, the Senate has several powers of advice and consent which are unique to it. These include the approval of treaties, and the confirmation of Cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, flag officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, other federal executive officials and other federal uniformed officers.
The heads of the executive departments are appointed by the President and take office after confirmation by the United States Senate, and serve at the pleasure of the President.

Joe Biden

BidenVice President Joe Biden Joe Biden
In November 1972, Joe Biden was elected to the Senate at the age of 29, but he reached his 30th birthday before the swearing-in ceremony for incoming senators in January 1973.
A member of the Democratic Party, he represented Delaware in the U.S. Senate from 1973 to 2009.

Connecticut Compromise

Great Compromisecompromisecompromise on representation
This idea of having one chamber represent people equally, while the other gives equal representation to states regardless of population, was known as the Connecticut Compromise.
Each state would have two representatives in the upper house.

John Eaton (politician)

John EatonJohn H. EatonJohn Henry Eaton
As a result, three senators who failed to meet the age requirement were nevertheless admitted to the Senate: Henry Clay (aged 29 in 1806), Armistead Thomson Mason (aged 28 in 1816), and John Eaton (aged 28 in 1818).
John Henry Eaton (June 18, 1790 – November 17, 1856) was an American politician and diplomat from Tennessee who served as U.S. Senator and as Secretary of War in the administration of Andrew Jackson.

1st United States Congress

First Congress1st Congress1st
This was achieved by dividing the senators of the 1st Congress into thirds (called classes), where the terms of one-third expired after two years, the terms of another third expired after four, and the terms of the last third expired after six years.
The First United States Congress, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, met from March 4, 1789, to March 4, 1791, during the first two years of George Washington's presidency, first at Federal Hall in New York City and later at Congress Hall in Philadelphia.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
The Democratic Party traditionally sits to the presiding officer's right, and the Republican Party traditionally sits to the presiding officer's left, regardless of which party has a majority of seats.
Following the results of the 2018 midterm elections, the Republican Party controls the bulk of the power in the United States as of 2019, holding the presidency (Donald Trump), a majority in the Senate, and a majority of governorships and state legislatures (full control of 30/50 legislatures, split control of two).