United States courts of appeals

Map of the boundaries of the United States courts of appeals and United States district courts

The United States courts of appeals are the intermediate appellate courts of the United States federal judiciary.

- United States courts of appeals

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United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Additionally, it sometimes handles appeals that originate from American Samoa, which has no district court and partially relies on the District of Hawaii for its federal cases.

Ninth Circuit Court House in 1905
The Richard H. Chambers U.S. Court of Appeals, Pasadena, California
Mary M. Schroeder, when appointed (Nov. 2000) Chief Judge of the Ninth Circuit, with her predecessor, Procter Ralph Hug Jr.

Headquartered in San Francisco, California, the Ninth Circuit is by far the largest of the thirteen courts of appeals, covering a total of 9 states and 2 territories and with 29 active judgeships.

Federal Reporter

Case law reporter in the United States that is published by West Publishing and a part of the National Reporter System.

The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States

The fourth and current Federal Reporter series publishes decisions of the United States courts of appeals and the United States Court of Federal Claims; prior series had varying scopes that covered decisions of other federal courts as well.

United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

Federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

The United States Reports is the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States.

The Eleventh Circuit is one of the thirteen United States courts of appeals.

United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit

Federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

The United States Reports is the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States.

With six active judges and four active senior judges, the First Circuit has the fewest judges of any of the thirteen United States courts of appeals.

United States circuit court

The United States circuit courts were the intermediate level courts of the United States federal court system from 1789 until 1912.

Coat of arms

The Judiciary Act of 1891 (, also known as the Evarts Act) transferred their appellate jurisdiction to the newly created United States circuit courts of appeals, which are now known as the United States courts of appeals.

Judiciary Act of 1891

The Judiciary Act of 1891, also known as the Evarts Act after its primary sponsor, Senator William M. Evarts, created the United States courts of appeals and reassigned the jurisdiction of most routine appeals from the district and circuit courts to these appellate courts.

Appellate court

Any court of law that is empowered to hear an appeal of a trial court or other lower tribunal.

The High Court of Australia, the highest appellate court in Australia
The Helsinki Court of Appeal (Helsingin hovioikeus), an intermediate appellate court in Finland

In the United States, both state and federal appellate courts are usually restricted to examining whether the lower court made the correct legal determinations, rather than hearing direct evidence and determining what the facts of the case were.

En banc

En banc session (also known as in banc, in banco or in bank) is a session in which a case is heard before all the judges of a court (before the entire bench) rather than by one judge or a smaller panel of judges.

Knowledge of French in the European Union and candidate countries

Federal appeals courts in the United States sometimes grant rehearing en banc to reconsider the decision of a panel of the court (consisting of only three judges) in which the case concerns a matter of exceptional public importance or the panel's decision appears to conflict with a prior decision of the court.

West (publisher)

Business owned by Thomson Reuters that publishes legal, business, and regulatory information in print, and on electronic services such as Westlaw.

West also reports decisions of the federal Courts of Appeals in the Federal Reporter and of the federal district courts in the Federal Supplement, and retroactively republished the decisions of all lower federal courts predating the NRS in Federal Cases.

United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

The United States Reports is the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States.

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (in case citations, D.C. Cir.) is one of the thirteen United States Courts of Appeals.