United States dollar

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The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792.wikipedia
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Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792.
Under this definition, US dollars, British pounds, Australian dollars, European euros and Russian ruble are examples of currency.

Dollar

$dollarsUS$
In practice, the dollar is divided into 100 smaller cent units, but is occasionally divided into 1000 mills for accounting.
Dollar (often represented by the dollar sign $) is the name of more than 20 currencies, including those of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Liberia, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, and the United States, whose US dollar is also the official currency of Caribbean Netherlands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, and Zimbabwe.

ISO 4217

codecurrency codeISO 4217 currency code
The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792.
This mechanism is called the currency "exponent" and assumes a base of 10. For example, USD (the United States dollar) is equal to 100 of its minor currency unit the "cent".

International use of the U.S. dollar

use it as their official currencyothersU.S. Dollar as a global currency
Several countries use it as their official currency, and in many others it is the de facto currency.
Besides being the main currency of the United States, the American dollar is used as the standard unit of currency in international markets for commodities such as gold and petroleum (the latter, sometimes called petrocurrency, is the source of the term petrodollar).

Dollar sign

$dollar symbolpeso sign
The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792.
The sign is first attested in Spanish American, American, Canadian, Mexican and other British business correspondence in the 1770s, referring to the Spanish American peso, also known as "Spanish dollar" or "piece of eight" in North America, which provided the model for the currency that the United States adopted in 1792 and the larger coins of the new Spanish American republics such as the Mexican peso, Peruvian eight-real and Bolivian eight-sol coins.

Reserve currency

reserve currenciesforeign currency reservesanchor currency
As it is the most used in international transactions, the U.S. dollar is the world's primary reserve currency.
By the end of the 20th century, the United States dollar was considered the world's most dominant reserve currency.

Currency symbol

signcurrency signsymbol
The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792.

Coins of the United States dollar

U.S. coinscoinscoin
These other coins are more fully described in Coins of the United States dollar.
Coins of the United States dollar were first minted in 1792.

De facto currency

de facto'' currencyDe facto currencies
Several countries use it as their official currency, and in many others it is the de facto currency.
The United States dollar and the European Union euro are the most common de facto currencies.

American Silver Eagle

American Eagle silver bullion coinsilversilver dollar
The pure silver dollar is known as the American Silver Eagle.
It is struck only in the one-troy ounce size, which has a nominal face value of one dollar and is guaranteed to contain one troy ounce of 99.9% pure silver.

Dime (United States coin)

dimedimes10¢
In addition to the dollar the coinage act officially established monetary units of mill or one-thousandth of a dollar (symbol ₥), cent or one-hundredth of a dollar (symbol ¢), dime or one-tenth of a dollar, and eagle or ten dollars, with prescribed weights and composition of gold, silver, or copper for each. In addition, due to the nature of U.S. coins, this will be the first time there will be circulating U.S. coins of different denominations with the same president featured on the obverse (heads) side (Lincoln/penny, Jefferson/nickel, Franklin D. Roosevelt/dime, Washington/quarter, Kennedy/half dollar, and Eisenhower/dollar).
The dime, in U.S. usage, is a ten-cent coin, one tenth of a United States dollar, labeled formally as "one dime".

Pound sterling

£poundspounds sterling
The colloquialism "buck"(s) (much like the British word "quid"(s, pl) for the pound sterling) is often used to refer to dollars of various nations, including the U.S. dollar.
Sterling is the third most-traded currency in the foreign exchange market, after the United States dollar, and the euro.

Unit of account

money of accountunits of accountaccounting currency
The sums of money reported in the "Statements" are currently being expressed in U.S. dollars (for example, see the 2009 Financial Report of the United States Government). The U.S. dollar may therefore be described as the unit of account of the United States.
Many international transactions continue to be settled in this way, using a national value (most often expressed in the US dollar or euro) but with the actual settlement in something else.

Money

monetaryspeciecash
There, "dollars" is a reference to the Spanish milled dollar, a coin that had a monetary value of 8 Spanish units of currency, or reales.
After World War II and the Bretton Woods Conference, most countries adopted fiat currencies that were fixed to the U.S. dollar.

Romanian leu

leiRONleu
It was also separately popular throughout Eastern Europe, where it led to the current Romanian and Moldovan currency being called leu (literally "lion").
The exchange rate was pegged at 167.20 lei to 1 U.S. dollar on February 7, 1929, 135.95 lei on November 5, 1936, 204.29 lei on May 18, 1940, and 187.48 Lei on March 31, 1941.

Coinage Act of 1792

Coinage ActMint and Coinage Act1792
In 1792 the U.S. Congress passed a Coinage Act.
The Coinage Act or the Mint Act, passed by the United States Congress on April 2, 1792, created the United States dollar as the country's standard unit of money, established the United States Mint, and regulated the coinage of the United States.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
St. Joachim's Valley is now known as Jáchymov, in the Czech Republic (then part of the Kingdom of Bohemia).
In 2016, Avast led by Pavel Baudiš bought rival AVG for US$1.3 billion, together at the time, these companies had a user base of about 400 million people and 40% of the consumer market outside of China.

Peso

pesos8 realesdollars
The sign was the result of a late 18th-century evolution of the scribal abbreviation "p s " for the peso, the common name for the Spanish dollars that were in wide circulation in the New World from the 16th to the 19th centuries.
Prior to 1873, the Mexican dollar would have been to all intents and purposes equal in value to the silver dollar coins of the United States north of the border, but at that time in history, the Mexican coin would have had a much greater international notoriety than that of the U.S. dollar.

Penny (United States coin)

centspennycent
In addition, due to the nature of U.S. coins, this will be the first time there will be circulating U.S. coins of different denominations with the same president featured on the obverse (heads) side (Lincoln/penny, Jefferson/nickel, Franklin D. Roosevelt/dime, Washington/quarter, Kennedy/half dollar, and Eisenhower/dollar).
The United States one-cent coin, often called the penny, is a unit of currency equaling one one-hundredth of a United States dollar.

Foreign exchange market

foreign exchangeforexcurrency exchange
The last peg was $42.22 per ounce before the U.S. dollar was allowed to freely float on currency markets.
For example, it permits a business in the United States to import goods from European Union member states, especially Eurozone members, and pay Euros, even though its income is in United States dollars.

Nixon shock

dollar hegemonyclosed the gold window15 August 1971
Since the suspension in 1971 of convertibility of paper U.S. currency into any precious metal, the U.S. dollar is, de facto, fiat money.
The Nixon shock was a series of economic measures undertaken by United States President Richard Nixon in 1971, the most significant of which was the unilateral cancellation of the direct international convertibility of the United States dollar to gold.

Stella (United States coin)

Stella$4 Stella$4.00 (Stella)
Stella: $4.00, (not circulated)
The United States four dollar coin, also officially called a Stella, is a unit of currency equivalent to four United States dollars.

Fiat money

fiat currencyfiatfiat currencies
Since the suspension in 1971 of convertibility of paper U.S. currency into any precious metal, the U.S. dollar is, de facto, fiat money.
This was a series of economic measures taken by United States President Richard Nixon in 1971, including unilaterally canceling the direct convertibility of the United States dollar to gold.

Circulation (currency)

circulationcirculatedmoney circulation
In the past, "paper money" was occasionally issued in denominations less than a dollar (fractional currency) and gold coins were issued for circulation up to the value of $20 (known as the "double eagle", discontinued in the 1930s).
In 1990, total currency in circulation in the world passed one trillion United States dollars.

Quarter (United States coin)

quarterquartersquarter dollar
In addition, due to the nature of U.S. coins, this will be the first time there will be circulating U.S. coins of different denominations with the same president featured on the obverse (heads) side (Lincoln/penny, Jefferson/nickel, Franklin D. Roosevelt/dime, Washington/quarter, Kennedy/half dollar, and Eisenhower/dollar).
The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a United States coin worth 25 cents, one-fourth of a dollar.